Skip directly to searchSkip directly to the site navigationSkip directly to the page's main content

Health Highlight Report for Catron County

Chlamydia Rates: Cases per 100,000 Population, 2017

  • Catron County
    83.8
    95% Confidence Interval (0.0 - 178.5)
    Statistical StabilityVery Unstable
    New Mexico
    645.1
    U.S.
    528.8
  • Catron County Compared to State

    gauge ranking
    Description of Dashboard Gauge

    Description of the Dashboard Gauge

    This "dashboard" type graphic is based on the community data on the right. It compares the community value on this indicator to the state overall value.
    • Excellent = The community's value on this indicator is BETTER than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.
    • Watch = The community's value is BETTER than state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Improvement Needed = The community's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, but the difference IS NOT statistically significant.
    • Reason for Concern = The community's value on this indicator is WORSE than the state value, and the difference IS statistically significant.

    The community value is considered statistically significantly different from the state value if the state value is outside the range of the community's 95% confidence interval. If the community's data or 95% confidence interval information is not available, a blank gauge image will be displayed with the message, "missing information."
    NOTE: The labels used on the gauge graphic are meant to describe the community's status in plain language. The placement of the gauge needle is based solely on the statistical difference between the community and state values. When selecting priority health issues to work on, a community should take into account additional factors such as how much improvement could be made, the U.S. value, the statistical stability of the community number, the severity of the health condition, and whether the difference is clinically significant.

Why Is This Important?

Chlamydia is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted disease. Even though symptoms of chlamydia are usually mild or absent, serious complications that cause irreversible damage, including infertility, can occur "silently" before a woman ever recognizes a problem(1). It is the leading preventable cause of infertility, and screening and treatment are the best means of preventing it.

Risk and Resiliency Factors

Chlamydia can be transmitted during vaginal, anal, or oral sex. Chlamydia can also be passed from an infected mother to her baby during vaginal childbirth. Any sexually active person can be infected with chlamydia. The greater the number of sex partners, the greater the risk of infection.

How Are We Doing?

Overall, chlamydia rates have been increasing from 2011 (547.0 per 100,000 population) to 2017 (645.1 per 100,000 population). In 2017, chlamydia rates were highest in the Black/African American race/ethnicity category (1097.8 per 100,000), second highest in the American Indian/Alaska Native population, (817.4 per 100,000 population), and third highest in the Hispanic category (497.9 per 100,000). The lowest rates were found in the White category (268.8 per 100,000 population) and Asian/Pacific Islander category (133.5 per 100,000) respectively. By county, the highest Chlamydia rate for 2017 was found in McKinley county (904.2 per 100,000), followed by Cibola County (898.4 per 100,000) and San Juan County (864.8 per 100,000). It is unknown whether this is an actual increase in rates or due to better testing and detection activities.

What Is Being Done?

Chlamydia testing is performed on females under age 26 at approximately 200 test sites including 54 public health offices and family planning and other provider agreement sites, in addition to routine treatment and surveillance activities.

Evidence-based Practices

Despite an a recommendation from the U.S Preventive Services Task Force to annually screen all sexually active females under age 25, data from health plans shows that fewer than 50% of that group actually gets screened each year. Chlamydia is the leading preventable cause of infertility, and screening and treatment are the best means of preventing it.

Related Indicators

Health Status Outcomes:


Data Sources

Patient Reporting Investigating Surveillance Manager, Infectious Disease Bureau, New Mexico Department of Health   Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.  

Measure Description for Chlamydia Rates

Definition: Chlamydia cases reported in the state of New Mexico per 100,000 population.
Numerator: Number of cases of chlamydia reported to the state of New Mexico (and Centers for Disease Control) in New Mexico residents from all health care providers.
Denominator: Total Population

Indicator Profile Report

Chlamydia Cases per 100,000 Population (exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

11/05/2018
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Wed, 26 June 2019 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Fri, 21 Jun 2019 11:52:53 MDT