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Complete Health Indicator Report of Alcohol - Drinking and Driving Among Youth

Definition

Youth drinking and driving is defined as a youth in grades 9-12 in a NM public school who reported driving a car or other vehicle when they had been drinking, in the past 30 days.

Numerator

Number of youth reporting driving after drinking in the past month

Denominator

Total number of youth participating in the YRRS

Data Interpretation Issues

Responses are weighted to reflect youth attending public middle and high schools in New Mexico. The YRRS is administered in odd years.

Why Is This Important?

Drinking and driving is a major risk factor for motor vehicle accidents. Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for youth aged 15-20 years. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), alcohol impaired-driving fatalities accounted for 29% of the total motor vehicle traffic fatalities in the US in 2015.* The rate of drinking and driving among New Mexico high school students has been decreasing since 2003, and decreasing among US high school students since at least 2001. In recent years, NM had a higher rate than the US, but since 2009 there has not been a statistical difference between the tworates. In 2015, the prevalence of past-30-day drinking and driving was 7.4% among NM high school students. Drinking and driving mostly increased in prevalence with increasing grade levels (9th = 6.1%; 10th = 4.6%; 11th = 8.6%; 12th = 9.4%). White (6.0%) and American Indian (6.7%) students had lower rates of drinking and driving than Asian/Pacific Islander (13.8%) students. The difference in rates between boys (8.2%) and girls (6.4%) was not statistically significant. In 2015, the drinking and driving rate was highest in Lea (14.2%), Colfax (13.0%), Roosevelt (12.3%), Socorro (11.7%), and Taos (11.1%) counties. The rate was lowest in Curry (2.6%), Chaves (3.2%), De Baca (3.9%), Guadalupe (5.7%), and San Juan (5.7%) counties. *https://crashstats.nhtsa.dot.gov/Api/Public/ViewPublication/812318

Other Objectives

Substance Abuse Epidemiology Report Indicator

Available Services

Doctors, nurses and other health professionals should screen all adult patients and counsel those who drink too much to drink less. This is called alcohol screening and brief intervention (A-SBI). A-SBI can reduce how much alcohol a person drinks on an occasion by 25%. A-SBI is recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Community Guide), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), and the World Health Organization (WHO). For more information on A-SBI, please the CDC vital signs website: www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/alcohol-screening-counseling/index.html


Graphical Data Views

Youth Drinking and Driving (past 30 days), Grades 9-12 by Year, New Mexico and U.S., 2003-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Drinking and driving is a major risk factor for motor vehicle accidents. Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for youth aged 15-20 years. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), alcohol impaired-driving fatalities accounted for 29% of the total motor vehicle traffic fatalities in the US in 2015.* The rate of drinking and driving among New Mexico high school students has been decreasing since 2003, and decreasing among US high school students since at least 2001. In recent years, NM had a higher rate than the US, but since 2009 there has not been a statistical difference between the two rates. *https://crashstats.nhtsa.dot.gov/Api/Public/ViewPublication/812318
NM vs. U.S.YearPercentage Drinking and DrivingLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 16
New Mexico200319.117.420.9
New Mexico20051210.613.6
New Mexico200712.510.514.9
New Mexico20099.78.111.6
New Mexico20119.38.110.8
New Mexico20138.97.610.1
New Mexico20157.46.58.4
New Mexico20176.55.48
United States200312.110.813.4
United States20059.98.911
United States200710.59.311.9
United States20099.78.710.8
United States20118.27.68.8
United States2013108.511.8
United States20157.4
United States20175.54.96.3

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, New Mexico Department of Health and Public Education Department.
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey Data


Youth Drinking and Driving (past 30 days), Grades 9-12 by County, New Mexico, 2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

In 2015, the drinking and driving rate was highest in Lea (14.2%), Colfax (13.0%), Roosevelt (12.3%), Socorro (11.7%), and Taos (11.1%) counties. The rate was lowest in Curry (2.6%), Chaves (3.2%), De Baca (3.9%), Guadalupe (5.7%), and San Juan (5.7%) counties.
CountyPercentage Drinking and DrivingLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 36
Bernalillo5.44.46.71112,105
Catron****
Chaves107.113.934349
Cibola9.16.512.553573
Colfax7.63.914.1*13174
Curry2.30.68**4134
De Baca****
Dona Ana7.45.210.456667
Eddy10.16.315.817161
Grant11.97.518.330243
Guadalupe428.1*5130
Harding****
Hidalgo7.93.815.5*8104
Lea10.77.415.265473
Lincoln8.56.910.433397
Los Alamos6.8411.213200
Luna15.37.528.7*989
McKinley6.82.915.1*13200
Mora9.42.232.6**768
Otero7.35.110.524328
Quay4.20.917.1**6173
Rio Arriba11.75.423.5*37297
Roosevelt6.21.324.3**14135
Sandoval6.54.39.763785
San Juan6.44.49.331639
San Miguel8.46.610.624299
Santa Fe8.26.89.81001,184
Sierra10.14.620.6*677
Socorro3.21.47.3*6157
Taos10.98.214.455514
Torrance5.33.38.413241
Union6.33.212.2*7104
Valencia5.93.79.417272
New Mexico7.16.47.988011,335
U.S.108.511.8

Data Notes

**Data suppressed due to small numbers

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, New Mexico Department of Health and Public Education Department.
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey Data


Youth Drinking and Driving (past 30 days), Grades 9-12 by Grade, Sex, and Race/Ethnicity, New Mexico, 2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

In 2015, the prevalence of past-30-day drinking and driving was 7.4% among NM high school students. Drinking and driving mostly increased in prevalence with increasing grade levels (9th = 6.1%; 10th = 4.6%; 11th = 8.6%; 12th = 9.4%). White (6.0%) and American Indian (6.7%) students had lower rates of drinking and driving than Asian/Pacific Islander (13.8%) students. The difference in rates between boys (8.2%) and girls (6.4%) was not statistically significant.
Grade Level YRRSSex and RacePercentage Drinking and DrivingLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 90
9th GradeMale, American Indian9.42.728.1**569
9th GradeMale, Asian/Pacific Islander****
9th GradeMale, Black****
9th GradeMale, Hispanic4.21.89.3*8150
9th GradeMale, White1.60.211.3**159
9th GradeMale, All Races5.138.717301
9th GradeFemale, American Indian3.6111.7**373
9th GradeFemale, Asian/Pacific Islander****
9th GradeFemale, Black****
9th GradeFemale, Hispanic4.21.79.8*6148
9th GradeFemale, White4.91.316.4**364
9th GradeFemale, All Races4.12.46.812300
9th GradeBoth Sexes, American Indian7.74.114.1*9143
9th GradeBoth Sexes, Asian/Pacific Islander****
9th GradeBoth Sexes, Black****
9th GradeBoth Sexes, Hispanic4.72.68.315299
9th GradeBoth Sexes, White3.31.28.8*4123
9th GradeBoth Sexes, All Races5.13.57.431603
10th GradeMale, American Indian9.53.821.9*875
10th GradeMale, Asian/Pacific Islander****
10th GradeMale, Black****
10th GradeMale, Hispanic52.310.5*12218
10th GradeMale, White2.30.77.2**3135
10th GradeMale, All Races5.23.18.626458
10th GradeFemale, American Indian2.90.810.2**575
10th GradeFemale, Asian/Pacific Islander****
10th GradeFemale, Black****
10th GradeFemale, Hispanic5.52.910.3*15233
10th GradeFemale, White6.53.212.7*7147
10th GradeFemale, All Races5.33.18.927480
10th GradeBoth Sexes, American Indian6.42.614.9*13150
10th GradeBoth Sexes, Asian/Pacific Islander****
10th GradeBoth Sexes, Black****
10th GradeBoth Sexes, Hispanic5.23.47.927451
10th GradeBoth Sexes, White4.42.38.3*10282
10th GradeBoth Sexes, All Races5.23.87.253938
11th GradeMale, American Indian6.73.113.8*675
11th GradeMale, Asian/Pacific Islander****
11th GradeMale, Black****
11th GradeMale, Hispanic7.24.910.316212
11th GradeMale, White74.311.213175
11th GradeMale, All Races6.94.99.637503
11th GradeFemale, American Indian4.11.510.9*587
11th GradeFemale, Asian/Pacific Islander****
11th GradeFemale, Black****
11th GradeFemale, Hispanic5.53.87.915226
11th GradeFemale, White5.71.816.5**7145
11th GradeFemale, All Races5.43.58.329485
11th GradeBoth Sexes, American Indian5.33911164
11th GradeBoth Sexes, Asian/Pacific Islander****
11th GradeBoth Sexes, Black****
11th GradeBoth Sexes, Hispanic6.34.58.631438
11th GradeBoth Sexes, White6.43.511.520320
11th GradeBoth Sexes, All Races6.14.48.566990
12th GradeMale, American Indian105.218.3*977
12th GradeMale, Asian/Pacific Islander****
12th GradeMale, Black****
12th GradeMale, Hispanic13.89.819.327200
12th GradeMale, White6.32.813.4*11147
12th GradeMale, All Races106.714.647447
12th GradeFemale, American Indian5.61.815.9**364
12th GradeFemale, Asian/Pacific Islander****
12th GradeFemale, Black****
12th GradeFemale, Hispanic7.13.513.8*15244
12th GradeFemale, White8.34.514.911129
12th GradeFemale, All Races7.44.112.831455
12th GradeBoth Sexes, American Indian85.212.212141
12th GradeBoth Sexes, Asian/Pacific Islander****
12th GradeBoth Sexes, Black****
12th GradeBoth Sexes, Hispanic10.16.914.542444
12th GradeBoth Sexes, White7.23.912.922277
12th GradeBoth Sexes, All Races8.75.912.578904
TotalMale, American Indian8.9515.428296
TotalMale, Asian/Pacific Islander****
TotalMale, Black7.71.828.1**361
TotalMale, Hispanic7.75.810.163782
TotalMale, White4.83.27.328517
TotalMale, All Races6.95.48.71271,712
TotalFemale, American Indian3.92.36.716302
TotalFemale, Asian/Pacific Islander****
TotalFemale, Black****
TotalFemale, Hispanic6.14.28.753857
TotalFemale, White6.5410.428485
TotalFemale, All Races64.57.91021,730
TotalBoth Sexes, American Indian6.84.510.145602
TotalBoth Sexes, Asian/Pacific Islander9.23.721*785
TotalBoth Sexes, Black7.92.621.9**698
TotalBoth Sexes, Hispanic75.48.81171,640
TotalBoth Sexes, White5.647.8561,004
TotalBoth Sexes, All Races6.55.482323,451

Data Notes

**Data suppressed due to small numbers

Data Source

New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, New Mexico Department of Health and Public Education Department.

References and Community Resources

The New Mexico Department of Health Substance Abuse Epidemiology Section has New Mexico-specific reports, resources and publications, available at: nmhealth.org/about/erd/ibeb/sap. CDC Alcohol Program has fact sheets, online tool kits, data and recently published literature, available at: www.cdc.gov/alcohol. The CDC also publishes the Prevention Status Reports (PSR), which highlight, for all 50 states and the District of Columbia, the status of public health policies and practices designed to address important public health problems and concerns. The 2013 PSR for excessive alcohol use can be found at: www.cdc.gov/psr/alcohol. The Community Preventive Services Task Force reviews research and makes recommendations to help communities answer the question "what works?" Community Guide recommendations for preventing excessive alcohol consumption can be found at: www.thecommunityguide.org/alcohol.

More Resources and Links

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

Page Content Updated On 11/30/2018, Published on 12/19/2018
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Sun, 16 June 2019 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Wed, 19 Dec 2018 08:43:40 MST