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Complete Health Indicator Report of Asthma Mortality

Definition

Asthma mortality rate is reported as the number of deaths due to asthma per 100,000 persons in the population per year, age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. population

Numerator

Number of deaths among New Mexico residents due to asthma as the underlying cause of death

Denominator

Estimated total number of New Mexico residents (NM population).

Data Interpretation Issues

New Mexico Data: Results include deaths of New Mexico residents, including those whose death occurred outside of New Mexico. Results do not include non-residents who died in New Mexico. Population Estimates: All population estimates apply to July 1 of the selected year. Estimates include decimal fractions. The sum of population subgroup estimates may not exactly equal the overall state population estimate due to rounding error. ICD-Codes:ICD Stands for International Classification of Diseases. It is a coding system maintained by the World Health Organization and the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics used to classify causes of death on death certificates and diagnoses, injury causes, and medical procedures for hospital and emergency department visits. These codes are updated every decade or so to account for advances in medical technology. The U.S. is currently using the 10th revision (ICD-10) to code causes of death.

Why Is This Important?

Asthma is one of the chronic diseases that affect both children and adults. Asthma specific causes are still unknown but, most of its symptoms' triggers are. Poorly controlled asthma have adverse consequences including impairment and death. In addition to its medical costs, asthma reduces productivity and causes lost of school or work days. Although a cure for asthma is yet to be found, it can be managed and controlled following guidelines-based recommendations that entail taking the right medication, developing and following an asthma self-management action plan, and eliminating irritants and triggers from the surrounding environment.

Healthy People Objective: RD-1, Reduce asthma deaths

U.S. Target: Not applicable, see subobjectives in this category

How Are We Doing?

In New Mexico, excluding the year 2013, the overall asthma death rate remained constant from 2011 to 2015. From 1999 to 2015, in New Mexico an annual average of 23.8 asthma deaths (count-numerator) occurred, with a total of 429 deaths.

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

New Mexico age-adjusted asthma death rates have generally fluctuated around 6 to 20 deaths per one million persons from 1999 to 2015, compared with U.S. age-adjusted rates for the same time period that have ranged from 10 to 17 deaths per one million persons. The U.S. rates remained almost constant since 2007.

What Is Being Done?

The New Mexico Department of Health Asthma Program collects, analyzes, and disseminates asthma data in order to identify populations that have high burden of asthma. The Asthma Program also works with partners throughout the state (such as hospitals, physician groups, insurance plans, and schools) to design and implement health interventions to lessen the disease burden. Current interventions include providing asthma self-management education to pediatric patients, supporting indoor air quality assessments of schools to limit exposures to potential asthma triggers, and offering provider training on the NAEPP asthma medical guidelines.

Evidence-based Practices

Asthma and its symptoms can be controlled and related impairments or hospitalizations can be prevented. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) of the National Institutes of Health-National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute had issued guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma. These guidelines translated advances in scientific and clinical research into practical advice for people with asthma, for the health care providers who look after them, and for the communities where they live. The guidelines included the best scientific evidence about comprehensive, long term management strategies designed to prevent and reverse airway inflammation and to manage asthma attacks. They set up standardmethods for doctors to gauge the severity of a patient asthma and monitor treatment progress. The guidelines also noted that people with asthma should use a written action plan with treatment instructions to control their illness and handle worsening asthma. They encouraged partnerships among individuals with asthma, families, and clinicians. They also laid out control measures to avoid or eliminate environmental factors that bring on asthma symptoms or attacks. The NAEPP guidelines were updated in 1997 and 2007 to reflect new research findings, but they marked only the beginning of America road to breathing easier. While caring for individual patients is a crucial step, the road does not end in a doctor office or hospital. Decreasing the burden of asthma also demands a comprehensive and coordinated public health approach. The National Asthma Control Program is working with states to implement appropriate measures for improving asthma outcomes. In summary, evidence-based guidelines suggest effective approaches for asthma management and control. These approaches include taking the appropriate short- and long-term medications, creating asthma self-management action plan, and controlling environmental and comorbid conditions.

Available Services

The Asthma Program works with partners (e.g., hospitals, physicians, insurance plans, and schools) throughout the state to design and implement health interventions to lessen asthma burden, especially in areas of asthma disparities. Current interventions include providing asthma self-management education to pediatric patients and training Community Health Workers for home visits with people with asthma to assist them in identifying and eliminating irritants and triggers from the house. Available Services The New Mexico Asthma Program, funded entirely through a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control, supports health intervention activities aimed at increasing asthma awareness in the state, improving asthma self-management through patient education initiatives, and providing health care provider training on the latest National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Asthma Guidelines for medical practice. For more information about the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program's (NAEPP) Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Asthma visit https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-pro/guidelines/current/asthma-guidelines New Mexico Asthma Program Information For information about the asthma program in New Mexico visit https://nmhealth.org/about/erd/eheb/ap/ Asthma Program, New Mexico Department of Health, P.O. Box 26110, 1190 St. Francis Drive, Suite N1300, Santa Fe, NM 87505.


Related Indicators

Relevant Population Characteristics

Asthma prevalence is disproportionally distributed among racial/ethnic groups and low-high income groups in NM. Moreover, language is a barrier to accessing quality health care among these who do not speak English.

Related Relevant Population Characteristics Indicators:


Related Health Care System Factors Indicators:




Graphical Data Views

Asthma Deaths by Year, New Mexico and U.S., 1999-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

NM vs. U.S.YearDeaths per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 37
New Mexico19991.91.22.5311,798,161
New Mexico200021.32.6331,828,596
New Mexico20011.81.22.5321,851,525
New Mexico20021.612.2291,874,593
New Mexico20031.512.1281,897,658
New Mexico20041.50.92281,920,756
New Mexico200510.61.5201,943,827
New Mexico20061.20.71.7231,966,890
New Mexico20071.512301,989,996
New Mexico20080.80.41.2172,013,064
New Mexico20090.70.41.1162,036,124
New Mexico201010.61.5222,065,194
New Mexico20111.20.81.7272,083,725
New Mexico20121.20.71.6262,091,432
New Mexico20130.60.30.9142,095,156
New Mexico20141.20.81.7282,098,381
New Mexico20151.20.71.6252,099,856
New Mexico20161.30.81.8272,103,586
New Mexico20171.81.22.4412,102,521
United States19991.71.71.84,657279,040,168
United States20001.61.61.64,487281,421,906
United States20011.51.41.54,269284,968,955
United States20021.51.41.54,261287,625,193
United States20031.41.41.44,099290,107,933
United States20041.31.31.33,816292,805,298
United States20051.31.21.33,884295,516,599
United States20061.21.11.23,613298,379,912
United States20071.11.11.13,447301,231,207
United States20081.111.13,397304,093,966
United States20091.111.13,388306,771,529
United States2010111.13,404308,745,538
United States20111113,345311,591,917
United States20121.111.13,531313,914,040
United States20131.111.13,630316,128,839
United States20141.111.13,651318,857,056
United States20151113,615321,418,820
United States20161113,518

Data Notes

All population estimates apply to July 1 of the selected year. Estimates include decimal fractions. The sum of population subgroup estimates may not exactly equal the overall state population estimate due to rounding error.   Data have been directly age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. IBIS calculated this age-adjusted rate using the direct method. If there were fewer than 25 cases in the analysis, the indirect method of age-adjustment should be used. For more information on age-adjustment, please visit [https://ibis.health.state.nm.us/resource/AARate.html]. The National Data: Deaths for persons of unknown age are included in counts and crude rates, but are not included in age-adjusted rates; rates and population figures for years 2001 - 2009 differ slightly from previously published reports, due to use of the population estimates which were available at the time of release; and the population figures used in the calculation of death rates for the age group 'under 1 year' are the estimates of the resident population that is under one year of age. For more information about National data visit [https://wonder.cdc.gov].

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).


Asthma Deaths Geographic Distribution, by County, New Mexico 2013-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Statistical stability, reported in the data table, is based on a statistic called the "Relative Standard Error," or RSE, which is the standard error expressed as a proportion of the point estimate (e.g., 30% of the point estimate). The following conventions are used here to interpret the RSE. * A dash (-) means that the relative standard error (RSE) is below 0.30 and the count or rate may be considered stable. * "Unstable" is displayed when the RSE is 0.30-0.50. An unstable count or rate may fluctuate widely across time periods due to random variation (chance). * "Very Unstable" is displayed when the RSE is greater than 0.50. A very unstable count or rate should not be used to inform decisions. You may combine years or otherwise increase the population size used in the query to achieve a more stable count or rate. Problems with statistical instability typically occur when there is a small number of health events in a small population. For more information on statistical stability, visit the NM-IBIS Reliability & Validity page [https://ibis.health.state.nm.us/resource/ReliabilityValidity.html].
CountyDeaths per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 35
Bernalillo10.61.3-353,391,457
Catron0018.7Unstable018,196
Chaves20.43.6Unstable6330,058
Cibola0.902.8Very Unstable1137,013
Colfax3.407.5Very Unstable364,499
Curry1.603.2Very Unstable4252,219
De Baca0035.6Unstable09,528
Dona Ana0.70.21.2Unstable91,080,411
Eddy0.401.2Very Unstable1284,813
Grant002.3Unstable0144,899
Guadalupe4.7014Very Unstable122,544
Harding0098.4Unstable03,450
Hidalgo2.306.7Very Unstable122,689
Lea20.43.7Unstable6347,844
Lincoln003.4Unstable0100,089
Los Alamos2.105.3Very Unstable290,641
Luna204.7Very Unstable2123,460
McKinley1.30.12.5Unstable5369,205
Mora2.607.7Very Unstable123,532
Otero0.401Very Unstable2328,297
Quay007.9Unstable042,856
Rio Arriba0.401.2Very Unstable1198,690
Roosevelt103.1Very Unstable198,680
Sandoval1.40.52.4Unstable10697,728
San Juan1.40.52.3Unstable9646,357
San Miguel2.204.4Very Unstable4141,484
Santa Fe1.20.41.9Unstable10740,919
Sierra0.601.9Very Unstable157,108
Socorro3.808.4Very Unstable387,411
Taos1.503.3Very Unstable3166,393
Torrance7.20.913.5Unstable678,615
Union0015.5Unstable021,876
Valencia1.80.53Unstable8381,436
New Mexico1.211.4-13510,504,397
U.S.1.51U.S. value is for 2014

Data Notes

All population estimates apply to July 1 of the selected year. Estimates include decimal fractions. The sum of population subgroup estimates may not exactly equal the overall state population estimate due to rounding error.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).


Asthma Deaths by Race/Ethnicity, 2013-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Statistical stability, reported in the data table, is based on a statistic called the "Relative Standard Error," or RSE, which is the standard error expressed as a proportion of the point estimate (e.g., 30% of the point estimate). The following conventions are used here to interpret the RSE. * A dash (-) means that the relative standard error (RSE) is below 0.30 and the count or rate may be considered stable. * "Unstable" is displayed when the RSE is 0.30-0.50. An unstable count or rate may fluctuate widely across time periods due to random variation (chance). * "Very Unstable" is displayed when the RSE is greater than 0.50. A very unstable count or rate should not be used to inform decisions. You may combine years or otherwise increase the population size used in the query to achieve a more stable count or rate. Problems with statistical instability typically occur when there is a small number of health events in a small population. For more information on statistical stability, visit the NM-IBIS Reliability & Validity page [https://ibis.health.state.nm.us/resource/ReliabilityValidity.html].
Race/EthnicityDeaths per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 6
American Indian/Alaska Native1.50.72.413948,552
Asian/Pacific Islander0.802.5Warning, value very unstable1173,586
Black/African American5.82.49.312223,654
Hispanic10.71.2425,058,436
White1.20.91.5664,100,169
New Mexico1.211.410,504,397

Data Notes

All population estimates apply to July 1 of the selected year. Estimates include decimal fractions. The sum of population subgroup estimates may not exactly equal the overall state population estimate due to rounding error.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).

References and Community Resources

New Mexico Asthma Control Program. https://nmhealth.org/about/erd/eheb/ap/ Breathing Easy in New Mexico. https://nmhealth.org/publication/view/plan/353/ Breathing Easier. https://www.cdc.gov/asthma/pdfs/breathing_easier_brochure.pdf CDC Asthma. https://www.cdc.gov/asthma/faqs.htm

More Resources and Links

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

Page Content Updated On 11/03/2018, Published on 11/02/2018
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Mon, 26 August 2019 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Fri, 2 Nov 2018 15:59:24 MDT