Skip directly to searchSkip directly to the site navigationSkip directly to the page's main content

Complete Health Indicator Report of Breastfeeding in Early Postpartum Period

Definition

The percentage of mothers who ever breastfed and were breastfeeding exclusively at two months.

Numerator

The number of PRAMS survey respondents who indicated they were breastfeeding at each of the two time periods.

Denominator

The total number of women in the PRAMS survey sample.

Why Is This Important?

Breastfeeding provides a variety of important benefits for infants, mothers, families, society, and environment. It is the normal, preferred feeding for all infants, including premature and sick babies, with rare exceptions (American Academy of Pediatrics, 1997). Breast milk benefits the newborn infant by providing the ideal balance of nutrients, enzymes, immunoglobulin, anti-infective and anti-inflammatory substances, hormones, and growth factors. Breastfeeding helps the mother return to the physiologic pre-pregnant state. It benefits both mother and child by providing a time of intense, nurturing, maternal-infant interaction. In addition, breastfeeding provides social and economic benefits to the family, including reduced health care costs and reduced employee absenteeism for care related to children's illnesses.

Healthy People Objective: MICH-21.4, Increase the proportion of infants who are breastfed: Exclusively through 3 months

U.S. Target: 46.2 percent

What Is Being Done?

The New Mexico Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Program WIC supports over 70% of NM women giving live birth, either prenatally or postpartum and promotes and supports breastfeeding. WIC Breastfeeding Promotion activities include: training of professional and paraprofessional staff, providing grants to local agencies for "Peer Counseling Programs," providing hand pumps and electric pumps to WIC mothers, and developing written policies for WIC clinics that promote breastfeeding. State and Federal laws protect pumping of breast milk in the workplace: USE OF A BREAST PUMP IN THE WORKPLACE: NMSA 1978, Section 28-20-2 (amended 2007) requires employers to provide flexible break time, and a clean, private space, not a bathroom, in order to foster the ability of a nursing mother who is an employee to use a breast pump in the workplace.


Related Indicators

Health Care System Factors

Pregnant women are encouraged to discuss their feeding choices with their prenatal care provider, and to receive prenatal education. Most hospitals will honor a mother's desire to keep her baby in the room with her (essential for successful breastfeeding). Mothers should request assistance from a lactation professional in the hospital. Short hospital stays may not include sufficient time for breastfeeding assistance and anticipatory guidance. Mothers and their babies should be seen by their health care provider within the first week to ensure normal initiation of breastfeeding.

Risk Factors

In the event that a mother is separated from her newborn (due to medical condition of mother or baby), a hospital-grade breast pump should be provided and utilized to establish successful lactation.

Health Status Outcomes

Breastfeeding promotes optimal health status for infants and mothers, and may provide long-term health benefits as well (for the infant, protects against obesity, diabetes, Crohn's disease, promotes positive oral health; for the mother, protects against anemia, overweight, breast cancer, and osteoporosis).



Graphical Data Views

Percentage of Mothers Who Initiated Breastfeeding by County, New Mexico 1997-2010

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

CountyEver BreastfedLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 35
Bernalillo85.2%83.9%86.4%
Catron94.4%88.3%97.4%
Chaves78.6%75.3%81.5%
Cibola76.7%71.4%81.3%
Colfax74.2%66.7%80.6%
Curry70.8%67.0%74.4%
De Baca74.2%63.3%82.7%
Dona Ana83.6%81.6%85.4%
Eddy64.0%59.6%68.1%
Grant81.8%76.6%86.1%
Guadalupe79.6%74.5%83.9%
Harding74.2%63.3%82.7%
Hidalgo73.0%56.5%85.0%
Lea69.5%65.7%73.1%
Lincoln81.7%71.9%88.7%
Los Alamos100.0%
Luna73.2%66.8%78.7%
McKinley83.6%80.5%86.2%
Mora62.3%48.5%74.3%
Otero78.5%74.6%81.9%
Quay74.2%63.3%82.7%
Rio Arriba78.4%74.4%81.9%
Roosevelt77.5%72.1%82.0%
Sandoval85.6%82.6%88.1%
San Juan85.6%83.3%87.6%
San Miguel79.6%74.5%83.9%
Santa Fe91.4%89.3%93.2%
Sierra94.4%88.3%97.4%
Socorro79.7%72.5%85.4%
Taos89.7%84.9%93.0%
Torrance80.5%71.0%87.4%
Union74.2%66.7%80.6%
Valencia81.8%78.0%85.2%
NM82.2%81.6%82.9%
US78.6%75.5%81.4%

Data Notes

The following county estimates were combined due to small number of surveys: Colfax & Union; Catron & Sierra; De Baca & Harding & Quay; Guadelupe & San Miguel.   U.S. value is 2008 median value for 29 participating states. Question wording: Did you ever breastfeed or pump breast milk to feed your new baby after delivery? How many weeks or months did you breastfeed or pump milk to feed your baby? How old was your new baby the first time you fed him or her anything besides breast milk?

Data Source

New Mexico Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, Family Health Bureau, New Mexico Department of Health.


Percentage of Mothers Breastfeeding Exclusively at Two Months Postpartum by County, New Mexico 1997-2010

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

CountyBreastfeeding Exclusively at Two Months PostpartumLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 35
Bernalillo37.1%35.5%38.8%
Catron37.1%27.4%47.9%
Chaves26.0%22.9%29.4%
Cibola25.8%20.9%31.4%
Colfax33.3%26.2%41.1%
Curry21.6%18.5%25.0%
De Baca21.2%13.8%31.1%
Dona Ana29.7%27.6%32.0%
Eddy19.9%16.9%23.4%
Grant42.1%36.0%48.4%
Guadalupe38.1%32.8%43.8%
Harding21.2%13.8%31.1%
Hidalgo24.7%15.2%37.5%
Lea20.6%17.7%23.8%
Lincoln32.8%25.4%41.2%
Los Alamos64.3%51.6%75.2%
Luna20.8%16.1%26.3%
McKinley33.8%30.4%37.3%
Mora27.0%17.1%39.9%
Otero34.6%30.6%38.8%
Quay21.2%13.8%31.1%
Rio Arriba37.1%32.8%41.6%
Roosevelt22.3%17.7%27.7%
Sandoval36.2%32.7%39.9%
San Juan37.7%34.9%40.7%
San Miguel38.1%32.8%43.8%
Santa Fe48.5%45.6%51.3%
Sierra37.1%27.4%47.9%
Socorro39.8%32.6%47.5%
Taos47.9%42.0%53.8%
Torrance25.4%17.9%34.6%
Union33.3%26.2%41.1%
Valencia32.5%28.3%36.9%
NM34.1%33.4%34.9%
US56.3%52.8%59.6%

Data Notes

The following county estimates were combined due to small number of surveys: Colfax & Union; Catron & Sierra; De Baca & Harding & Quay; Guadelupe & San Miguel.   U.S. value is 2008 median value for 29 participating states. Question wording: Did you ever breastfeed or pump breast milk to feed your new baby after delivery? How many weeks or months did you breastfeed or pump milk to feed your baby? How old was your new baby the first time you fed him or her anything besides breast milk?

Data Source

New Mexico Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, Family Health Bureau, New Mexico Department of Health.


Percentage of Mothers by Breastfeeding Status at Two Months Postpartum by County, New Mexico 1997-2010

::chart - missing::

This graph shows the percentage of mothers by breastfeeding status. The bottom bar segment are those mothers who were breastfeeding exclusively at two months postpartum. The middle segment are those mothers who initiated breastfeeding, but were not breastfeeding exclusively at two months postpartum. The top segment represents those mothers who never initiated breastfeeding.
Breastfeeding Status at 2 Months PostpartumCountyPercentage of Mothers
Record Count: 102
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyBernalillo37.1%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyCatron37.1%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyChaves26.0%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyCibola25.8%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyColfax33.3%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyCurry21.6%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyDe Baca21.2%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyDona Ana29.7%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyEddy19.9%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyGrant42.1%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyGuadalupe38.1%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyHarding21.2%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyHidalgo24.7%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyLea20.6%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyLincoln32.8%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyLos Alamos64.3%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyLuna20.8%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyMcKinley33.8%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyMora27.0%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyOtero34.6%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyQuay21.2%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyRio Arriba37.1%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyRoosevelt22.3%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelySandoval36.2%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelySan Juan37.7%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelySan Miguel38.1%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelySanta Fe48.5%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelySierra37.1%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelySocorro39.8%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyTaos47.9%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyTorrance25.4%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyUnion33.3%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyValencia32.5%
Breastfeed Now ExclusivelyNM34.1%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowBernalillo48.0%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowCatron57.3%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowChaves52.6%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowCibola51.0%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowColfax41.0%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowCurry49.2%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowDe Baca53.0%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowDona Ana53.9%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowEddy44.1%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowGrant39.7%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowGuadalupe41.4%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowHarding53.0%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowHidalgo48.4%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowLea48.9%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowLincoln48.9%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowLos Alamos35.7%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowLuna52.4%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowMcKinley49.8%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowMora35.3%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowOtero43.9%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowQuay53.0%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowRio Arriba41.3%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowRoosevelt55.2%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowSandoval49.3%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowSan Juan47.8%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowSan Miguel41.4%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowSanta Fe43.0%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowSierra57.3%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowSocorro39.9%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowTaos41.8%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowTorrance55.1%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowUnion41.0%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowValencia49.4%
Not Exclusively Breastfeeding NowNM48.1%
Never BreastfedBernalillo14.8%
Never BreastfedCatron5.6%
Never BreastfedChaves21.4%
Never BreastfedCibola23.3%
Never BreastfedColfax25.8%
Never BreastfedCurry29.2%
Never BreastfedDe Baca25.8%
Never BreastfedDona Ana16.4%
Never BreastfedEddy36.0%
Never BreastfedGrant18.2%
Never BreastfedGuadalupe20.4%
Never BreastfedHarding25.8%
Never BreastfedHidalgo27.0%
Never BreastfedLea30.5%
Never BreastfedLincoln18.3%
Never BreastfedLos Alamos0.0%
Never BreastfedLuna26.8%
Never BreastfedMcKinley16.4%
Never BreastfedMora37.7%
Never BreastfedOtero21.5%
Never BreastfedQuay25.8%
Never BreastfedRio Arriba21.6%
Never BreastfedRoosevelt22.5%
Never BreastfedSandoval14.4%
Never BreastfedSan Juan14.4%
Never BreastfedSan Miguel20.4%
Never BreastfedSanta Fe8.6%
Never BreastfedSierra5.6%
Never BreastfedSocorro20.3%
Never BreastfedTaos10.3%
Never BreastfedTorrance19.5%
Never BreastfedUnion25.8%
Never BreastfedValencia18.1%
Never BreastfedNM17.8%

Data Notes

The following county estimates were combined due to small number of surveys: Colfax & Union; Catron & Sierra; De Baca & Harding & Quay; Guadelupe & San Miguel.

Data Source

New Mexico Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, Family Health Bureau, New Mexico Department of Health.

More Resources and Links

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

Page Content Updated On 05/25/2012, Published on 06/14/2012
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Thu, 17 October 2019 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 14:46:52 MDT