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Complete Health Indicator Report of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Hospital Admissions

Definition

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), which includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema, is a chronic lung disease that makes it hard to breathe. A COPD hospitalization of that occurs with COPD listed as the primary (first-listed) diagnosis of a New Mexico resident. A COPD diagnosis includes the ICD-9-CM codes 490-492 or 496 or 493.2* when 490-492 or 496 is present on any secondary diagnoses, and, after 10/2015, the ICD-10 codes J40-J44 for non-occupationally related incidents. Measures include: 1) the number of COPD hospitalizations by sex by year, 2) the number of COPD hospitalizations by county, 3) crude rate of COPD hospitalizations per 10,000 population by sex and by age groups 25-44, 45-64 and 65 and older, 4) crude rate of COPD hospitalizations per 10,000 population by age groups by year, 5) crude rate of COPD hospitalizations per 10,000 population by county, 6) crude rate of COPD hospitalizations by month (five year average), 7) age-adjusted rate of COPD hospitalizations per 10,000 population among persons 25 and over per 10,000 population by county (adjusted by the direct method to year 2000 US standard population) and 8) age-adjusted rate of COPD hospitalizations among persons 25 and over per 10,000 population by year (adjusted by the direct method to year 2000 US standard population).

Numerator

Number of adult hospital discharges where COPD is the primary (first-listed) diagnosis. Transfers to other facilities resulting in duplicate counts are removed.

Denominator

Estimated total number of New Mexico residents in a specified population over a specified time period.

Data Interpretation Issues

Currently, the hospital inpatient discharge dataset includes data from non-federal hospitals only. Therefore, these data do not include hospital discharges from Veteran's Administration (VA) facilities, nor from Indian Health Service (IHS) facilities, which account for a large proportion of hospitalizations for New Mexico's American Indian population. In addition, these data do not include hospitalizations among New Mexico residents that occur out of state with some exception for acute myocardial infarctions for New Mexico residents hospitalized in Texas.

Why Is This Important?

COPD, which includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema, is a chronic lung disease that makes it hard to breathe. It is a progressive disease, which means that the disease gets worse over time. The disease isn't passed from person to person, it is not contagious. However, COPD is a life threatening lung disease that may progressively lead to death and thus needs to be treated. The most common symptoms of COPD are breathlessness, a chronic cough that produces large amounts of mucus, wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and other symptoms. COPD develops slowly. Symptoms often worsen over time and can limit the ability to do routine activities. Severe COPD may prevent people from doing even basic activities like walking, cooking, or taking care of themselves. COPD has no cure yet and doctors don't know how to reverse the damage to the airways and lungs. However, COPD is often preventable and treatable. Treatments and lifestyle changes can help those affected feel better, stay more active, and slow the progress of the disease. Early detection of COPD is key to successful treatment. Knowing the symptoms or exposures to risk factors (see below) may lead to early diagnosis of COPD. COPD is a major cause of disability; was the third leading cause of death in the United States in 2014. COPD is the third leading cause of hospitalization in the United States with over 715,000 admissions in 2005. Beginning in 2008, COPD has surpassed stroke as the third leading cause of death in the U.S. As of 2009, 11.8 million adults aged 18+ years in the United States reported having physician-diagnosed COPD, however it is commonly accepted that COPD is frequently underdiagnosed. There are also large racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, and gender biases in COPD prevalence. Since 1993, the rate of admission for COPD in women surpasses that of men. Further, hospitalization rates generally increase with age, and are highest in those 65 years of age and older. It is estimated that nearly 24% of all Americans 65 years and older have COPD. In contrast to ED visits, COPD hospitalizations have declined in recent years, -22% in the last five years overall, -30% for males and -20% for females.

Other Objectives

CDC Environmental Public Health Tracking, Nationally Consistent Data and Measures (EPHT NCDM)

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

New Mexico and the United States have similar rates of COPD.

What Is Being Done?

Steps to be taken to reduce risk for COPD include: 1) If you are a smoker, STOP SMOKING. Quitting smoking is the single most important thing a smoker can do to live a longer and healthier life. The New Mexico Department of Health's Tobacco Use Prevention and Control (TUPAC) program and its partners use a comprehensive, evidence-based, approach to reducing tobacco use. The American Lung Association also has many programs to help you quit for good. 2) If you don't smoke, don't start. Smoking causes COPD, lung cancer, heart disease and other cancers. 3) Avoid exposure to secondhand smoke. Make your home smokefree. You'll not only protect yourself, but your family too. Learn about your rights to a smokefree environment at work and in public places. 4) Be aware of other dangers. Take care to protect yourself against chemicals, dust and fumes in your home and at work. 5) Help fight for clean air. Work with others in your community to help clean up the air you and your family breathe.


Related Indicators

Related Relevant Population Characteristics Indicators:


Risk Factors

Risk Factors for COPD (http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs315/en/; http://www.lung.org/lung-health-and-diseases/lung-disease-lookup/copd/ ; CDC COPD indicator template) - Tobacco smoking (either active or secondhand/passive exposure) - Indoor air pollution (such as biomass or solid fuel used for cooking and heating) - Outdoor air pollution - Occupational dusts and chemicals (such as vapors, irritants, and fumes) - Frequent lower respiratory infections during childhood - Genetics (Alpha-1 deficiency). Cigarette smoking (including secondhand or passive exposure) is the leading cause of COPD. Most people who have COPD smoke or used to smoke (about 85-90 percent of all COPD cases are caused by cigarette smoking http://www.lung.org/lung-health-and-diseases/lung-disease-lookup/copd/). Long-term exposure to other lung irritants, such as air pollution, chemical fumes, or dust also may contribute to COPD. Exposure to air pollution (both indoor and outdoor) has been linked to increases in COPD-related morbidity. Indoor exposures are predominantly from second-hand tobacco smoke and the use of biomass or solid fuels, while the most common non-occupational outdoor exposures are to particulate matter (PM10 & PM2.5), ozone, and sulfur dioxide from automobiles and industrial sources. Occupational exposures such as to fumes, gases, and both inorganic and organic dusts have been associated with COPD. About 19 percent of all COPD cases were attributable to occupational exposure with 31 percent in non-smokers. Alpha-1 deficiency is a genetic (inherited) condition that causes a rare form of COPD called alpha-1 deficiency-related emphysema in some people. This condition affects the body's ability to produce a protein (Apha-1), which protects the lungs.



Graphical Data Views

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Hospital Admissions, Number of Visits by Year and Sex, New Mexico 2007-2017

::chart - missing::

Sex: Males vs. FemalesYearNumber of Hospitalizations
Record Count: 22
Male20071,053
Male20081,338
Male20091,312
Male20101,286
Male20111,402
Male20121,281
Male20131,345
Male20141,242
Male20151,108
Male20161,021
Male20171,228
Female20071,233
Female20081,663
Female20091,452
Female20101,477
Female20111,622
Female20121,416
Female20131,619
Female20141,491
Female20151,246
Female20161,155
Female20171,278

Data Notes

ICD stands for International Classification of Diseases. It is a coding system maintained by the World Health Organization and the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics used to classify causes of death on death certificates and diagnoses, injury causes, and medical procedures for hospital and emergency department visits. These codes are updated every decade or so to account for advances in medical technology. The U.S. is currently using the 10th revision (ICD-10) to code causes of death. These codes are updated every decade or so to account for advances in medical technology. The U.S. is currently using the 10th revision (ICD-10) to code causes of death. The 9th revision ICD-9-CM was used for hospital and emergency department visits when reporting for occupational related incidents until October 2015 and thereafter are supposed to use ICD-10-CM.

Data Source

Hospital Inpatient Discharge Data, New Mexico Department of Health.


Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Hospital Admissions, New Mexico 2010-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

CountyNumber of HospitalizationsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 33
Bernalillo4,03303
Catron499
Chaves1,02402
Cibola47070
Colfax18080
Curry64242
De Baca344
Dona Ana2,38138
Eddy1,26726
Grant41919
Guadalupe10606
Harding188
Hidalgo644
Lea1,26126
Lincoln40101
Los Alamos922
Luna92727
McKinley31313
Mora600
Otero67272
Quay18585
Rio Arriba47878
Roosevelt43333
Sandoval78787
San Juan1,19619
San Miguel77878
Santa Fe1,23723
Sierra36262
Socorro18484
Taos36666
Torrance14040
Union977
Valencia56262

Data Notes

ICD stands for International Classification of Diseases. It is a coding system maintained by the World Health Organization and the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics used to classify causes of death on death certificates and diagnoses, injury causes, and medical procedures for hospital and emergency department visits. These codes are updated every decade or so to account for advances in medical technology. The U.S. is currently using the 10th revision (ICD-10) to code causes of death. These codes are updated every decade or so to account for advances in medical technology. The U.S. is currently using the 10th revision (ICD-10) to code causes of death. The 9th revision ICD-9-CM was used for hospital and emergency department visits when reporting for occupational related incidents until October 2015 and thereafter are supposed to use ICD-10-CM.

Data Source

Hospital Inpatient Discharge Data, New Mexico Department of Health.


Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Hospital Admissions, Crude Rate by Year and Age Group, New Mexico 2010-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Age Groups 10-24, 25-44, 45-64, 65+YearHospitalizations per 10,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 24
Age 25-4420101.311.6
Age 25-4420111.41.11.7
Age 25-44201210.71.3
Age 25-44201310.81.3
Age 25-4420140.90.71.2
Age 25-4420151.10.81.3
Age 25-4420160.70.40.9
Age 25-4420170.70.51
Age 45-64201014.813.815.8
Age 45-64201116.315.317.4
Age 45-64201216.815.717.9
Age 45-64201316.715.617.8
Age 45-64201416.215.217.3
Age 45-64201512.611.613.5
Age 45-64201613.112.114.1
Age 45-6420171412.915
Age 65+201067.964.971
Age 65+201170.967.874
Age 65+201257.75560.4
Age 65+201365.162.267.9
Age 65+201456.553.959.1
Age 65+201548.646.250.9
Age 65+201641.439.343.6
Age 65+201748.846.551.1

Data Notes

ICD stands for International Classification of Diseases. It is a coding system maintained by the World Health Organization and the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics used to classify causes of death on death certificates and diagnoses, injury causes, and medical procedures for hospital and emergency department visits. These codes are updated every decade or so to account for advances in medical technology. The U.S. is currently using the 10th revision (ICD-10) to code causes of death. These codes are updated every decade or so to account for advances in medical technology. The U.S. is currently using the 10th revision (ICD-10) to code causes of death. The 9th revision ICD-9-CM was used for hospital and emergency department visits when reporting for occupational related incidents until October 2015 and thereafter are supposed to use ICD-10-CM.

Data Sources

  • Hospital Inpatient Discharge Data, New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.


Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Hospital Admissions, Crude Rates by Age and Sex, New Mexico 2010-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Sex: Males vs. FemalesAge GroupHospitalizations per 10,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 36
Male0-40.40.30.6
Male5-90.100.2
Male10-140.100.2
Male15-190.20.10.3
Male20-240.100.2
Male25-290.20.10.3
Male30-340.40.20.6
Male35-390.80.51
Male40-4421.62.4
Male45-494.23.64.8
Male50-5410.29.411.1
Male55-5918.11719.3
Male60-6424.623.226
Male65-6936.83538.7
Male70-7455.152.457.8
Male75-7975.571.779.3
Male80-8481.576.786.3
Male85+91.786.197.4
Female0-40.70.40.9
Female5-90.20.10.3
Female10-140.100.1
Female15-190.20.10.3
Female20-240.20.10.4
Female25-290.30.10.4
Female30-340.60.40.8
Female35-391.61.21.9
Female40-442.72.23.1
Female45-496.65.97.3
Female50-5412.311.413.2
Female55-5919.11820.2
Female60-6425.32426.6
Female65-6936.83538.6
Female70-745552.557.6
Female75-7964.160.967.3
Female80-8472.168.176.1
Female85+65.561.869.2

Data Notes

ICD stands for International Classification of Diseases. It is a coding system maintained by the World Health Organization and the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics used to classify causes of death on death certificates and diagnoses, injury causes, and medical procedures for hospital and emergency department visits. These codes are updated every decade or so to account for advances in medical technology. The U.S. is currently using the 10th revision (ICD-10) to code causes of death. These codes are updated every decade or so to account for advances in medical technology. The U.S. is currently using the 10th revision (ICD-10) to code causes of death. The 9th revision ICD-9-CM was used for hospital and emergency department visits when reporting for occupational related incidents until October 2015 and thereafter are supposed to use ICD-10-CM.

Data Sources

  • Hospital Inpatient Discharge Data, New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.


Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Hospital Admissions, Crude Rate by County, New Mexico, 2010-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

CountyHospitalizations per 10,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 34
Bernalillo7.57.27.74,0335,402,896
Catron16.71221.34929,389
Chaves19.418.220.61,024527,698
Cibola21.519.523.4470219,040
Colfax17.114.619.6180105,429
Curry16.114.817.3642399,203
De Baca21.914.629.33415,521
Dona Ana13.913.314.42,3811,717,987
Eddy28.326.829.91,267447,651
Grant1816.319.7419233,090
Guadalupe2923.534.510636,551
Harding32.617.547.6185,529
Hidalgo17.21321.46437,181
Lea23.221.924.41,261544,585
Lincoln24.822.427.2401161,748
Los Alamos6.357.692144,963
Luna46.643.649.6927198,793
McKinley5.34.75.9313587,900
Mora15.811.819.86038,052
Otero12.911.913.9672521,282
Quay26.522.730.418569,686
Rio Arriba1513.616.3478319,367
Roosevelt27.124.629.7433159,546
Sandoval7.26.67.67871,100,488
San Juan11.510.912.21,1961,037,885
San Miguel33.931.636.3778229,288
Santa Fe10.59.911.11,2371,177,516
Sierra39354336292,907
Socorro13.111.214.9184140,926
Taos13.812.415.2366265,550
Torrance119.212.8140127,481
Union27.321.932.89735,490
Valencia9.28.49.9562612,770
New Mexico12.712.512.821,21816,743,387

Data Notes

ICD stands for International Classification of Diseases. It is a coding system maintained by the World Health Organization and the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics used to classify causes of death on death certificates and diagnoses, injury causes, and medical procedures for hospital and emergency department visits. These codes are updated every decade or so to account for advances in medical technology. The U.S. is currently using the 10th revision (ICD-10) to code causes of death. These codes are updated every decade or so to account for advances in medical technology. The U.S. is currently using the 10th revision (ICD-10) to code causes of death. The 9th revision ICD-9-CM was used for hospital and emergency department visits when reporting for occupational related incidents until October 2015 and thereafter are supposed to use ICD-10-CM.

Data Sources

  • Hospital Inpatient Discharge Data, New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.


Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Hospital Admissions, Crude Rate by Month, New Mexico 2010-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

MonthHospitalizations per 10,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 12
Jan 1.51.41.6
Feb 1.41.41.5
Mar 1.51.41.5
Apr 1.11.11.2
May 10.91
Jun 0.80.80.8
Jul 0.70.60.7
Aug 0.80.70.8
Sep 0.90.80.9
Oct 0.90.80.9
Nov 0.90.91
Dec 1.21.11.2

Data Notes

ICD stands for International Classification of Diseases. It is a coding system maintained by the World Health Organization and the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics used to classify causes of death on death certificates and diagnoses, injury causes, and medical procedures for hospital and emergency department visits. These codes are updated every decade or so to account for advances in medical technology. The U.S. is currently using the 10th revision (ICD-10) to code causes of death. These codes are updated every decade or so to account for advances in medical technology. The U.S. is currently using the 10th revision (ICD-10) to code causes of death. The 9th revision ICD-9-CM was used for hospital and emergency department visits when reporting for occupational related incidents until October 2015 and thereafter are supposed to use ICD-10-CM.

Data Sources

  • Hospital Inpatient Discharge Data, New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.


Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Hospital Admissions, - Age-adjusted Rate Amoung 25 Years and Older per 10,000 Population, New Mexico by County 2010-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

CountyHospitalizations among 25 years and older per 10,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 33
Bernalillo11.411.111.7
Catron12915
Chaves36.134.437.8
Cibola24.322.226.4
Colfax23.220.725.7
Curry31.629.633.5
De Baca27.620.834.4
Dona Ana21.120.421.8
Eddy40.83942.7
Grant21.519.923.1
Guadalupe44.938.551.3
Harding19.310.328.2
Hidalgo18.214.222.3
Lea38.236.340
Lincoln20.81922.6
Los Alamos7.25.98.5
Luna555258
McKinley10.79.711.7
Mora16.312.919.7
Otero19.418.220.6
Quay32.328.635.9
Rio Arriba19.618.121.1
Roosevelt44.941.448.5
Sandoval10.59.911.2
San Juan1918.120
San Miguel36.534.238.9
Santa Fe12.511.913.1
Sierra32.729.635.9
Socorro18.816.621
Taos1614.617.4
Torrance141216
Union40.334.446.2
Valencia12.811.913.8

Data Notes

ICD stands for International Classification of Diseases. It is a coding system maintained by the World Health Organization and the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics used to classify causes of death on death certificates and diagnoses, injury causes, and medical procedures for hospital and emergency department visits. These codes are updated every decade or so to account for advances in medical technology. The U.S. is currently using the 10th revision (ICD-10) to code causes of death. These codes are updated every decade or so to account for advances in medical technology. The U.S. is currently using the 10th revision (ICD-10) to code causes of death. The 9th revision ICD-9-CM was used for hospital and emergency department visits when reporting for occupational related incidents until October 2015 and thereafter are supposed to use ICD-10-CM.   Data were age-adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population.

Data Sources

  • Hospital Inpatient Discharge Data, New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.


Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Hospital Admissions, Age-adjusted Rate per 10,000 Population Age 25 Years and Older by County, New Mexico 2007-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

YearHospitalizations per 10,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 11
200716.615.917.3
200821.320.622.1
200919.418.620.1
20101918.219.7
201120.119.420.8
201217.416.718.1
201318.818.119.5
201416.816.117.4
201514.213.614.8
201612.812.313.4
201714.51415.1

Data Notes

ICD stands for International Classification of Diseases. It is a coding system maintained by the World Health Organization and the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics used to classify causes of death on death certificates and diagnoses, injury causes, and medical procedures for hospital and emergency department visits. These codes are updated every decade or so to account for advances in medical technology. The U.S. is currently using the 10th revision (ICD-10) to code causes of death. These codes are updated every decade or so to account for advances in medical technology. The U.S. is currently using the 10th revision (ICD-10) to code causes of death. The 9th revision ICD-9-CM was used for hospital and emergency department visits when reporting for occupational related incidents until October 2015 and thereafter are supposed to use ICD-10-CM.   Data were age-adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population.

Data Sources

  • Hospital Inpatient Discharge Data, New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.

More Resources and Links

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

Page Content Updated On 10/30/2018, Published on 11/07/2018
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Sat, 24 August 2019 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Wed, 7 Nov 2018 09:27:22 MST