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Complete Health Indicator Report of Cancer Deaths - Lung Cancer

Definition

Lung Cancer Deaths per 100,000 population in New Mexico

Numerator

Number of lung cancer deaths

Denominator

New Mexico population

Why Is This Important?

Among New Mexicans, lung cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in both men and women, and is the leading cause of cancer death overall. Approximately 90% of lung cancer cases in men and 80% in women are attributable to cigarette smoking (New Mexico Cancer Plan 2012-2017). Tobacco smoke contains at least 70 chemicals known to cause cancer in people or animals. People who smoke cigarettes are 15 to 30 times more likely to die from lung cancer than people who do not smoke.

Healthy People Objective: C-2, Reduce the lung cancer death rate

U.S. Target: 45.5 deaths per 100,000 population

Other Objectives

New Mexico Cancer Plan 2012-2017 Objectives: 1) By 2017, increase by 10% the proportion of adult smokers who saw a health care provider in the past year who were advised to quit smoking, from a 2009 baseline of 79% to 87%. 2) By 2017, decrease by 25% the proportion of NM middle school youth who have smoked cigarettes in the past 30 days, from a 2009 baseline of 6.8% to 5.1%. 3) By 2017, decrease by 25% the proportion of NM high school youth who have smoked cigarettes in the past 30 days, from a 2009 baseline of 24% to 18%. 4) By 2017, decrease by 14% the proportion of NM adults who currently smoke cigarettes, from a 2010 baseline of 18.5% to 16%. 5) By 2017, increase by 7% the proportion of NM adult smokers who have tried quitting in the past year, from a 2010 baseline of 60.7% to 65%. New Mexico Community Health Status Indicator (CHSI)

How Are We Doing?

The rate of death from lung cancer in New Mexico rose slightly during the 1980s, stabilized in the early 1990s, and has generally decreased in the most recent years.

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

The rate of death from lung cancer in New Mexico is lower than the the rate for the U.S. in all years over the past two decades.

What Is Being Done?

The New Mexico Department of Health's Tobacco Use Prevention and Control (TUPAC) Program and its partners use a comprehensive, evidence-based approach to promote healthy lifestyles that are free from tobacco abuse and addiction among all New Mexicans. TUPAC follows recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and works with communities, schools, and organizations across the state to implement activities and services that decrease the harmful and addictive use of commercial tobacco. Activities include: tobacco-free public high school and post-secondary campuses policy development, smoke-free multi-unit housing, point-of-sale marketing strategies, tobacco cessation services, public awareness and education campaigns, and initiatives to reduce health disparities. Other key tobacco prevention and control activities in the state are funded through the Department of Indian Affairs and the Human Services Department (Synar and FDA Programs).

Evidence-based Practices

Addressing tobacco use is best done through a coordinated effort to establish tobacco-free policies and social norms, to promote quitting tobacco and assist tobacco users in quitting, and to prevent initiation of tobacco use. This comprehensive approach combines educational, clinical, regulatory, economic, and social strategies. Research has documented strong or sufficient evidence in the use of the following strategies: - Increasing the unit price of tobacco products. - Restricting minors' access to tobacco products, and by restricting the time, place, and manner in which tobacco is marketed and sold. - Strategic, culturally appropriate, and high impact health communication messages (mass media), including paid TV, radio, billboard, print, and web-based advertising at state and local levels. - Ensuring that all patients seen in the health care system are screened for tobacco use, receive brief interventions to help them quit, and are offered more intensive counseling and low- or no-cost cessation medications. - Providing insurance coverage for tobacco use treatment, and phone- and web-based cessation services are effective and can reach large numbers of tobacco users. - Passage of laws and policies in a comprehensive tobacco control effort to protect the public from secondhand exposure. To potentially prevent some lung cancer deaths through early detection and treatment, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends annual screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in adults aged 55 to 80 years who have a 30 pack-year smoking history and currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. Screening should be discontinued once a person has not smoked for 15 years or develops a health problem that substantially limits life expectancy or the ability or willingness to have curative lung surgery. Sources: (1) CDC. Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs - 2014 (www.cdc.gov/tobacco/stateandcommunity/best_practices/pdfs/2014/comprehensive.pdf) (2) The Guide to Community Preventive Services: Tobacco Use - 2010 (www.thecommunityguide.org/tobacco/index.html) (3) The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force: Lung Cancer Screening Recommendation Summary - 2013 (https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/UpdateSummaryFinal/lung-cancer-screening)

Available Services

Tobacco users can access free NM Tobacco Cessation Services through the statewide toll free number 1-800-QUIT NOW (1-800-784-8669) or www.QuitNowNM.com for services in English; 1-855-DEJELO-YA (1-855-335-3569) or www.DejeloYaNM.com for services in Spanish; or TTY: 1-855-855-7081 for the deaf and hard of hearing. Cessation Services include free quit coaching, personalized quit plans, free nicotine patches, lozenges, or gum and optional text messaging support.

Health Program Information

Visit the TUPAC website at http://nmtupac.com/index.php


Related Indicators

Related Relevant Population Characteristics Indicators:


Related Health Care System Factors Indicators:


Risk Factors

Smoking is by far the leading risk factor for lung cancer. At least 80% of lung cancer deaths are thought to result from smoking. The risk for lung cancer among smokers is many times higher than among non-smokers. The longer you smoke and the more packs a day you smoke, the greater your risk. Cigar smoking and pipe smoking are almost as likely to cause lung cancer as cigarette smoking. Smoking low-tar or light cigarettes increases lung cancer risk as much as regular cigarettes. There is concern that menthol cigarettes may increase the risk even more since the menthol allows smokers to inhale more deeply. Even if you don't smoke, breathing in the smoke of others (called secondhand smoke) can increase your risk of developing lung cancer by almost 30%. Workers who have been exposed to tobacco smoke in the workplace are also more likely to get lung cancer. Secondhand smoke is thought to cause more than 7,000 deaths from lung cancer each year. After smoking, the next highest risk for lung cancer comes from exposure to radon. Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas created by the breakdown of uranium in soil and rocks and cannot be seen, tasted, or smelled. According to the US Environmental Protection Agency, radon is the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers. However, the risk from radon is much higher in people who smoke than in those who don't. There are other cancer-causing agents found in some work places that can increase lung cancer risk and include: asbestos; radioactive ores such as uranium; and inhaled chemicals or minerals such as arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, silica, vinyl chloride, nickel compounds, chromium compounds, coal products, mustard gas, chloromethyl ethers, and diesel exhaust. A few other factors that can influence a person's risk for lung cancer include: air pollution, radiation therapy to the lungs, arsenic in drinking water, certain dietary supplements, and a personal or family history of lung cancer. Source: American Cancer Society

Related Risk Factors Indicators:


Related Health Status Outcomes Indicators:




Graphical Data Views

Lung Cancer Deaths per 100,000 Population, by Year, New Mexico and U.S., 1999-2017

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confidence limits

NM vs. U.S.YearDeaths per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 56
New Mexico199937.334.440.26261,798,161
New Mexico200039.536.542.56811,828,596
New Mexico200137.734.840.56701,851,525
New Mexico200238.735.841.67021,874,593
New Mexico200339.036.241.97311,897,658
New Mexico200435.432.738.06831,920,756
New Mexico200536.333.638.97161,943,827
New Mexico200634.331.736.86921,966,890
New Mexico200737.334.740.07711,989,996
New Mexico200835.032.437.57412,013,064
New Mexico200932.229.834.76942,036,124
New Mexico201033.731.236.17462,065,194
New Mexico201130.227.932.56892,081,550
New Mexico201232.129.834.57552,092,246
New Mexico201330.127.932.47332,096,134
New Mexico201429.527.331.67342,099,510
New Mexico201529.126.931.27432,102,646
New Mexico201626.824.728.86982,103,586
New Mexico201725.423.527.36782,102,521
United States199955.455.155.7152,063279,040,168
United States200056.155.856.3155,431281,421,906
United States200155.355.055.6155,973284,968,955
United States200254.954.755.2157,630287,625,193
United States200354.153.854.4157,992290,107,933
United States200453.253.053.5158,009292,805,298
United States200552.752.452.9159,220295,516,599
United States200651.551.351.8158,600298,379,912
United States200750.650.350.8158,686301,231,207
United States200849.549.349.7158,592304,093,966
United States200948.348.148.6158,086306,771,529
United States201047.647.447.8158,249308,745,538
United States201146.045.746.2156,957311,591,917
United States201244.944.745.1157,426313,914,040
United States201343.443.143.6156,178316,128,839
United States201442.141.942.3155,529318,857,056
United States201540.540.340.7153,722321,418,820
United States201638.338.138.5148,870323,127,513
United States201736.636.436.8145,849325,719,178

Data Notes

Lung cancer mortality is defined as malignant neoplasm of bronchus and lung (ICD10: C34).   Data have been directly age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).


Average Annual Lung Cancer Deaths per 100,000 Population, by Sex, New Mexico and U.S., 1999-2017

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confidence limits

NM vs. U.S. by SexYearDeaths per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 76
New Mexico Males199947.542.552.5356887,576
New Mexico Males200051.846.656.9399902,832
New Mexico Males200147.843.052.7384914,243
New Mexico Males200250.745.755.7408925,708
New Mexico Males200349.945.154.8419937,162
New Mexico Males200444.039.548.5382948,644
New Mexico Males200545.040.549.5397960,104
New Mexico Males200642.538.246.8388971,566
New Mexico Males200745.841.350.2425983,045
New Mexico Males200844.440.048.7423994,506
New Mexico Males200938.934.943.03711,005,966
New Mexico Males201040.936.844.94101,020,594
New Mexico Males201136.933.140.73811,028,562
New Mexico Males201238.834.942.64071,034,871
New Mexico Males201336.332.639.93911,037,304
New Mexico Males201434.731.238.23921,039,408
New Mexico Males201532.128.835.43731,040,867
New Mexico Males201631.728.535.03811,041,711
New Mexico Males201730.527.333.63701,041,347
New Mexico Females199929.325.832.8270910,585
New Mexico Females200029.826.433.3282925,764
New Mexico Females200129.526.132.9286937,282
New Mexico Females200229.726.333.1294948,885
New Mexico Females200330.527.133.9312960,497
New Mexico Females200428.425.231.7301972,112
New Mexico Females200529.526.332.8319983,724
New Mexico Females200627.524.430.6304995,324
New Mexico Females200730.427.233.73461,006,951
New Mexico Females200827.424.430.43181,018,559
New Mexico Females200927.224.230.23231,030,157
New Mexico Females201027.824.830.83361,044,600
New Mexico Females201124.922.127.73081,052,988
New Mexico Females201226.924.129.83481,057,375
New Mexico Females201325.622.828.33421,058,830
New Mexico Females201425.422.628.13421,060,102
New Mexico Females201526.623.829.33701,061,779
New Mexico Females201622.620.125.23171,061,875
New Mexico Females201721.519.023.93081,061,174
U.S. Males199976.876.377.389,401136,802,873
U.S. Males200076.776.277.290,415138,053,563
U.S. Males200175.274.775.790,367139,891,492
U.S. Males200273.472.973.990,121141,230,559
U.S. Males200371.871.372.389,908142,428,897
U.S. Males200470.169.770.689,578143,828,012
U.S. Males200569.168.669.690,141145,197,078
U.S. Males200667.066.667.489,243146,647,265
U.S. Males200764.964.565.488,331148,064,854
U.S. Males200863.563.163.988,541149,489,951
U.S. Males200961.461.061.887,697150,807,454
U.S. Males201060.359.960.787,699151,781,326
U.S. Males201157.757.358.186,738153,290,819
U.S. Males201256.155.756.486,690154,492,067
U.S. Males201353.753.354.185,659155,651,602
U.S. Males201451.751.352.084,861156,936,487
U.S. Males201549.549.149.883,648158,229,297
U.S. Males201646.746.447.080,775159,078,923
U.S. Males201744.344.044.778,694160,408,119
U.S. Females199940.239.940.562,662142,237,295
U.S. Females200041.341.041.665,016143,368,343
U.S. Females200141.140.841.465,606145,077,463
U.S. Females200241.641.341.967,509146,394,634
U.S. Females200341.341.041.668,084147,679,036
U.S. Females200440.940.641.268,431148,977,286
U.S. Females200540.640.340.969,079150,319,521
U.S. Females200640.139.840.469,357151,732,647
U.S. Females200740.039.740.370,355153,166,353
U.S. Females200839.138.839.470,051154,604,015
U.S. Females200938.638.338.970,389155,964,075
U.S. Females201038.137.838.470,550156,964,212
U.S. Females201137.036.837.370,219158,301,098
U.S. Females201236.436.136.670,736159,421,973
U.S. Females201335.535.235.770,519160,477,237
U.S. Females201434.734.435.070,668161,920,569
U.S. Females201533.533.233.770,074163,189,523
U.S. Females201631.831.632.168,095164,048,590
U.S. Females201730.630.430.867,155165,311,059

Data Notes

Lung cancer mortality is defined as malignant neoplasm of bronchus and lung (ICD10: C34).   Data have been directly age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).


Average Annual Lung Cancer Deaths per 100,000 Population by Age Group, New Mexico, 2013-2017

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confidence limits

Age GroupDeaths per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 5
Age 0-340.00.00.1Very Unstable14,947,196
Age 35-492.82.03.6521,843,970
Age 50-6434.031.536.56992,055,489
Age 65-79142.5135.9149.11,8081,268,702
Age 80+263.7247.6279.81,026389,040

Data Notes

Lung cancer mortality is defined as malignant neoplasm of bronchus and lung (ICD10: C34).   **This count or rate is extremely unstable (RSE >0.50). This value should not be used to infer population risk. You should combine years or otherwise increase your population size.

Data Source

New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.


Average Annual Lung Cancer Deaths per 100,000 Population by Sex, New Mexico, 2013-2017

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confidence limits

Sex, M/FDeaths per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 3
Total28.127.229.03,58610,504,397
Male32.931.434.41,9075,200,637
Female24.223.125.41,6795,303,760

Data Notes

Lung cancer mortality is defined as malignant neoplasm of bronchus and lung (ICD10: C34).   Data have been directly age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Source

New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.


Average Annual Lung Cancer Deaths per 100,000 Population by Race/Ethnicity, New Mexico, 2013-2017

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confidence limits

Race/EthnicityDeaths per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 7
American Indian/Alaska Native10.17.812.574948,552
Asian/Pacific Islander21.113.628.633173,586
Black/African American3728.14669223,654
Hispanic21.620.2239165,058,436
White33.732.3352,4854,100,169
New Mexico28.127.2293,58610,504,397
United States40.14040.2U.S. data from CDC Wonder: 2013-2017760,1481,605,251,406

Data Notes

Lung cancer mortality is defined as malignant neoplasm of bronchus and lung (ICD10: C34).   Data have been directly age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).


Average Annual Lung Cancer Deaths per 100,000 Population by County, New Mexico, 2013-2017

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confidence limits

CountyDeaths per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 35
Bernalillo27.325.629.01,0493,391,457
Catron21.68.634.6Unstable1118,196
Chaves39.333.045.6154330,058
Cibola26.718.634.743137,013
Colfax29.819.540.13464,499
Curry37.829.945.690252,219
De Baca44.915.474.3Unstable99,528
Dona Ana29.826.632.93511,080,411
Eddy38.231.445.0125284,813
Grant27.821.134.670144,899
Guadalupe34.313.754.9Unstable1122,544
Harding32.50.096.1Very Unstable13,450
Hidalgo28.310.746.0Unstable1022,689
Lea42.034.749.2130347,844
Lincoln27.620.135.055100,089
Los Alamos16.49.523.42290,641
Luna47.537.457.688123,460
McKinley12.28.415.941369,205
Mora16.34.128.4Unstable723,532
Otero37.931.943.8158328,297
Quay40.226.454.03342,856
Rio Arriba19.213.924.651198,690
Roosevelt32.020.843.23298,680
Sandoval25.021.528.5208697,728
San Juan25.822.029.7176646,357
San Miguel24.618.031.354141,484
Santa Fe18.415.821.0202740,919
Sierra48.236.560.06957,108
Socorro25.616.534.73187,411
Taos20.715.226.258166,393
Torrance29.719.440.03478,615
Union23.97.340.5Unstable821,876
Valencia35.430.040.8171381,436
New Mexico28.127.229.03,58610,504,397
U.S.40.140.040.2U.S. data from CDC Wonder: 2013-2017760,1481,605,251,406

Data Notes

Lung cancer mortality is defined as malignant neoplasm of bronchus and lung (ICD10: C34).   Data have been directly age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. *This count or rate is statistically unstable (RSE >0.30), and may fluctuate widely across time periods due to random variation (chance). **This count or rate is extremely unstable (RSE >0.50). This value should not be used to infer population risk. You should combine years or otherwise increase your population size.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).


Average Annual Lung Cancer Deaths per 100,000 Population by County and Sex, 2013-2017

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confidence limits

Sex: Males vs. FemalesCountyDeaths per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 104
MaleBernalillo31.328.634.15191,662,481
MaleCatron34.412.756.1Unstable109,545
MaleChaves50.339.860.890164,095
MaleCibola30.517.343.62169,896
MaleColfax28.714.243.21632,722
MaleCurry46.233.259.250130,660
MaleDe Baca66.613.3120Unstable64,715
MaleDona Ana3630.941.1197530,481
MaleEddy47.236.258.372143,488
MaleGrant30.820.6413771,458
MaleGuadalupe54.718.890.6Unstable912,722
MaleHarding00190.1Unstable01,784
MaleHidalgo42.110.873.4Unstable711,383
MaleLea47.5365968179,193
MaleLincoln26.715.737.82449,299
MaleLos Alamos208.531.51245,815
MaleLuna56.541725261,717
MaleMcKinley18.411.325.527178,823
MaleMora16.9035.9Very Unstable312,009
MaleOtero40.731.849.781168,973
MaleQuay39.119.2591520,835
MaleRio Arriba30.620.241.13597,586
MaleRoosevelt28.112.743.61349,271
MaleSandoval27.121.732.6103341,784
MaleSan Juan31.525.13897319,729
MaleSan Miguel32.521443370,096
MaleSanta Fe19.915.82499360,288
MaleSierra53.93770.74028,616
MaleSocorro32.217.4471944,381
MaleTaos19.411.627.22581,553
MaleTorrance37.721.453.92241,260
MaleUnion36.47.265.6Unstable612,472
MaleValencia43.534.752.399191,506
MaleNew Mexico32.931.434.41,9075,200,637
MaleU.S.49.148.949.2U.S. data from CDC Wonder: 2013-2017413,637790,304,428
FemaleBernalillo24.522.426.75301,728,976
FemaleCatron5.7016.9Very Unstable18,651
FemaleChaves30.222.637.764165,963
FemaleCibola24.314.134.42267,116
FemaleColfax30.115.744.41831,777
FemaleCurry30.320.939.840121,560
FemaleDe Baca26.5056.7Very Unstable34,813
FemaleDona Ana24.520.628.4154549,930
FemaleEddy30.922.539.353141,325
FemaleGrant25.216.334.23373,441
FemaleGuadalupe15.7038.8Very Unstable29,822
FemaleHarding63.10186.4Very Unstable11,666
FemaleHidalgo16034.1Very Unstable311,306
FemaleLea37.928.447.462168,651
FemaleLincoln28.518.338.63150,791
FemaleLos Alamos13.75.122.2Unstable1044,827
FemaleLuna39.32652.63661,743
FemaleMcKinley7.43.511.414190,381
FemaleMora17.60.334.9Very Unstable411,522
FemaleOtero35.127.24377159,324
FemaleQuay41.322.260.51822,020
FemaleRio Arriba10.45.315.616101,104
FemaleRoosevelt372053.91949,409
FemaleSandoval23.218.727.8105355,944
FemaleSan Juan21.316.52679326,628
FemaleSan Miguel18.410.426.42171,389
FemaleSanta Fe17.413.920.8103380,631
FemaleSierra42.125.958.32928,492
FemaleSocorro19.98.531.21243,031
FemaleTaos221429.93384,840
FemaleTorrance21.6934.21237,354
FemaleUnion10.8025.7Very Unstable29,404
FemaleValencia28.221.634.872189,930
FemaleNew Mexico24.223.125.41,6795,303,760
FemaleU.S.33.13333.3U.S. data from CDC Wonder: 2013-2017346,511814,946,978

Data Notes

Lung cancer mortality is defined as malignant neoplasm of bronchus and lung (ICD10: C34).   Data have been directly age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. *This rate is statistically unstable (RSE >0.30), and may fluctuate widely across time periods due to random variation (chance). **This rate is extremely unstable (RSE >0.50). This value should not be used to infer population risk.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).


Average Annual Lung Cancer Deaths per 100,000 Population, by Health Region, New Mexico, 2013-2017

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confidence limits

New Mexico Health RegionDeaths per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 7
Northwest22.219.524.92601,152,575
Northeast20.018.121.94481,474,027
Metro27.726.329.21,4624,549,236
Southeast37.734.740.76281,466,088
Southwest33.030.735.47881,862,472
New Mexico28.127.229.03,58610,504,397
US40.140.040.2U.S. data from CDC Wonder: 2013-2017760,1481,605,251,406

Data Notes

Lung cancer mortality is defined as malignant neoplasm of bronchus and lung (ICD10: C34).   Data have been directly age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).


Average Annual Lung Cancer Deaths per 100,000 Population, by Urban and Rural Counties, New Mexico, 2013-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Urban Versus Rural CountiesDeaths per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 6
Metropolitan Counties27.726.329.21,4624,549,236
Small Metro Counties24.722.826.57292,467,687
Mixed Urban-Rural30.829.032.61,1163,013,697
Rural Counties31.728.035.5279473,778
New Mexico28.127.229.03,58610,504,397
U.S.40.140.040.2U.S. data from CDC Wonder: 2013-2017760,1481,605,251,406

Data Notes

Lung cancer mortality is defined as malignant neoplasm of bronchus and lung (ICD10: C34).   Data have been directly age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).


Lung Cancer Deaths per 100,000 Population, by U.S. States, 2017

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confidence limits

StateDeaths per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 52
Alabama46.745.048.42,9464,874,747
Alaska31.426.836.0203739,795
Arizona30.529.331.62,7687,016,270
Arkansas50.948.653.21,9543,004,279
California26.626.127.111,55539,536,653
Colorado24.823.626.11,4955,607,154
Connecticut31.529.933.11,5083,588,184
Delaware41.337.844.8550961,939
District of Columbia30.626.334.9202693,972
Florida36.035.436.711,40320,984,400
Georgia38.837.640.04,39210,429,379
Hawaii28.325.930.85451,427,538
Idaho30.227.732.66071,716,943
Illinois39.038.040.06,00912,802,023
Indiana47.245.648.73,7926,666,818
Iowa39.637.641.51,6203,145,711
Kansas39.437.341.51,3902,913,123
Kentucky56.554.558.53,1524,454,189
Louisiana46.344.548.12,5594,684,333
Maine44.841.947.89191,335,907
Maryland35.934.537.32,5756,052,177
Massachucetts35.234.036.53,0746,859,819
Michigan42.341.243.55,5029,962,311
Minnesota34.032.635.52,3165,576,606
Mississippi49.347.051.61,8042,984,100
Missouri46.645.148.13,6906,113,532
Montana32.529.535.54651,050,493
Nebraska35.833.338.38151,920,076
Nevada38.035.940.11,3122,998,039
New Hampshire38.535.641.57001,342,795
New Jersey31.530.532.63,5629,005,644
New Mexico25.623.627.56782,088,070
New York31.330.632.07,82119,849,399
North Carolina41.840.743.05,28610,273,419
North Dakota34.730.838.7310755,393
Ohio44.643.645.76,79611,658,609
Oklahoma46.844.848.82,2103,930,864
Oregon34.933.336.51,8654,142,776
Pennsylvania38.837.839.76,91012,805,537
Rhode Island39.336.042.75561,059,639
South Carolina41.239.642.82,7005,024,369
South Dakota38.434.642.1422869,666
Tennessee47.546.049.04,0016,715,984
Texas32.732.033.49,10928,304,596
Utah17.215.618.84513,101,833
Vermont39.835.644.0356623,657
Virginia36.835.638.03,7108,470,020
Washington33.932.735.22,9287,405,743
West Virginia49.646.952.31,3381,815,857
Wisconsin37.536.139.02,8025,795,483
Wyoming30.426.234.5216579,315
United States36.636.436.8U.S. data from CDC Wonder: 2017145,849325,719,178

Data Notes

Lung cancer mortality is defined as malignant neoplasm of bronchus and lung (ICD10: C34).

Data Source

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).

References and Community Resources

REFERENCES: 1. The New Mexico Department of Health's Tobacco Use Prevention and Control (TUPAC) program website (http://www.nmtupac.com/index.php) 2. New Mexico Tumor Registry (http://som.unm.edu/nmtr/) 3. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program (http://seer.cancer.gov/) 4. National Cancer Institute State Cancer Profiles (http://statecancerprofiles.cancer.gov/index.html) 5. New Mexico Department of Health Cancer Prevention and Control Section (http://www.cancernm.org) RESOURCES: Visit www.nmtupac.com for more information about the NM TUPAC Program and www.QuitNowNM.com for help in quitting tobacco use. NM Human Services Synar and FDA Programs can be reached at 505-476-9285.

More Resources and Links

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

Page Content Updated On 12/13/2018, Published on 12/21/2018
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Tue, 17 September 2019 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Fri, 21 Dec 2018 12:48:24 MST