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Complete Health Indicator Report of Cancer Incidence - Cervical Cancer

Definition

New cases of cervical cancer per 100,000 population (females) in New Mexico

Numerator

Number of new cervical cancer cases in New Mexico

Denominator

New Mexico female population

Why Is This Important?

Invasive cervical cancer represents approximately 2% of all new cancer cases and 2% of all cancer deaths in New Mexican women. Regular screening with Pap tests and/or human papillomavirus (HPV) tests, as appropriate, can detect pre-cancers caused by HPV, which, when treated, can stop cervical cancer before it develops. Cervical cancer screening can also lead to earlier diagnosis of cervical cancer that may result in more effective treatment.

Healthy People Objective: C-10, Reduce invasive uterine cervical cancer

U.S. Target: 7.1 new cases per 100,000 females

Other Objectives

Other relevant HP2020 objectives: C-15: Increase the proportion of women who receive a cervical cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines

How Are We Doing?

The overall New Mexico cervical cancer incidence rate of 7.5 new cases per 100,000 females over the most recent 5-year period (2011-2015) is slightly higher than the Healthy People 2020 goal of 7.3.

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

Historically, New Mexico has had a slightly higher cervical cancer incidence rate than the U.S., both of which have declined over the past several decades. In the most recent 5-year period (2011-2015), the overall New Mexico cervical cancer incidence rate of 7.5 new cases per 100,000 females is the same as the United States rate of 7.5.

What Is Being Done?

The New Mexico Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NMBCCP) is dedicated to improving access to high-quality, age-appropriate cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services for low-income women and transgender men who have a cervix and who are uninsured or under-insured. The NMBCCP also helps program participants access resources for treatment when necessary. To do this, the NMBCCP supports changes within provider practices and health systems to increase screening opportunities. In addition, data and surveillance systems, such as monitoring screening quality measures, are used to develop more organized, systematic approaches to cancer screening and to improve service delivery. These approaches are supported by the New Mexico Department of Health and are being implemented by many healthcare organizations and health systems throughout New Mexico. Visit the NMBCCP website at: http://archive.cancernm.org/bcc/index.html

Evidence-based Practices

The NMBCCP supports New Mexico health care providers and health systems in using evidence-based interventions such as patient reminders, risk assessment tools, reducing structural barriers (e.g., expanding clinic hours), provider reminder and recall systems, and provider assessment and feedback on performance. All of these activities have been shown to increase cervical cancer screening rates, and are recommended by The Guide to Community Preventive Services, a collection of evidence-based findings of the Community Preventive Services Task Force, established by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Available Services

The NMBCCP provides free cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to New Mexico women and transgender men with a cervix who are ages 21 years and older, lack health insurance, and live at or below 250% of the federal poverty level. More information can be found online at http://archive.cancernm.org/bcc/index.html or by calling toll-free 1-877-852-2585.

Health Program Information

The NMBCCP endorses the cervical cancer screening recommendations of the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). In 2018, the USPSTF recommendation for screening for cervical cancer states that screening should occur every 3 years with cervical cytology alone (e.g., a Pap test) in women aged 21 to 29 years. For women aged 30 to 65 years, the USPSTF recommends screening every 3 years with cervical cytology alone, every 5 years with high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) testing alone, or every 5 years with hrHPV testing in combination with cytology (cotesting). The USPSTF recommendation applies to all women who have a cervix, regardless of sexual history. It does not apply, however, to women who have received a diagnosis of a high-grade precancerous cervical lesion or cervical cancer, women with in utero exposure to diethylstilbestrol, or women who are immuno-compromised (such as those who are HIV positive). The USPSTF notes that screening with Pap tests or HPV testing can also sometimes lead to harms, mainly false positive screening results requiring additional diagnostic testing. Adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with treatment of screening-detected disease can also occur, although changes to screening guidelines for young women in recent years have been enacted to minimize this.


Related Indicators

Health Care System Factors

Prevention of cervical cancer through access to affordable screening is crucial for continuing to reduce new cases of cervical cancer. The introduction of the HPV vaccine just over a decade ago is also anticipated to greatly reduce new cases of cervical cancer and other HPV-related cancers.

Related Health Care System Factors Indicators:


Risk Factors

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, almost all cervical cancers are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), a common virus that can be passed from one person to another during sex. There are many types of HPV. Some HPV types can cause changes on a woman's cervix that can lead to cervical cancer over time, while other types can cause genital or skin warts. HPV is so common that most people get it at some time in their lives. HPV usually causes no symptoms so you can't tell that you have it. For most women, HPV will go away on its own; however, if it does not, there is a chance that over time it may cause cervical cancer. Other factors can also increase your risk of cervical cancer, including: smoking; having HIV (the virus that causes AIDS) or another condition that makes it hard for your body to fight off health problems; using birth control pills for a long time (five or more years); having given birth to three or more children; and having several sexual partners.

Related Risk Factors Indicators:


Related Health Status Outcomes Indicators:




Graphical Data Views

New Cervical Cancer Cases per 100,000 population (Females) by Year, New Mexico and U.S., 2000-2015

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confidence limits

NM vs. U.S.YearCases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 32
New Mexico20008.66.710.578925,764
New Mexico20019.77.711.790937,282
New Mexico20028.56.710.480948,885
New Mexico20037.65.89.472960,497
New Mexico20049.67.611.694972,112
New Mexico20058.86.910.783983,724
New Mexico20067.65.99.377995,324
New Mexico20076.65.08.2661,006,951
New Mexico20088.46.610.2861,018,559
New Mexico20096.75.18.2711,030,157
New Mexico20107.65.99.3791,044,600
New Mexico20118.06.29.8821,052,988
New Mexico20126.54.98.0711,057,375
New Mexico20137.25.58.8761,058,830
New Mexico20148.26.410.1821,060,102
New Mexico20157.86.09.6801,061,779
United States20009.69.49.713,730140,494,755
United States20019.08.99.213,261143,603,977
United States20028.78.68.912,903144,919,222
United States20038.48.38.512,696147,679,036
United States20048.28.08.312,489148,977,286
United States20058.38.28.412,780150,213,467
United States20068.28.08.312,696151,732,647
United States20078.17.98.212,692153,166,353
United States20088.07.98.112,724154,604,015
United States20098.17.98.212,895155,964,075
United States20107.77.67.912,495157,259,450
United States20117.67.57.712,430158,399,998
United States20127.57.47.712,388159,531,199
United States20137.47.27.512,260160,615,344
United States20147.67.57.712,722161,783,394
United States20157.67.57.812,845162,936,583

Data Notes

Cervical cancer incidence is defined as new cases of malignant cancer of the cervix uteri.   Data have been directly age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 Standard Population.

Data Sources

  • Numerator: The New Mexico Tumor Registry, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, http://hsc.unm.edu/som/nmtr/.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).


Average Annual New Cervical Cancer Cases per 100,000 population (Females) by Race/Ethnicity, New Mexico, 2011-2015

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Race/EthnicityCases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 7
American Indian/Alaska Native9.66.612.641486,369
Asian/Pacific Islander9.33.515.2*Unstable1090,960
Black/African American2.405.6**Very Unstable297,080
Hispanic7.168.21622,503,748
White7.66.48.81742,112,918
New Mexico7.56.88.33915,291,074
United States7.57.57.6U.S. data from CDC Wonder: 2011-201562,645803,266,518

Data Notes

Cervical cancer incidence is defined as new cases of malignant cancer of the cervix uteri.   Data have been directly age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 Standard Population. *This rate is statistically unstable (.30 < RSE <= 0.50), and may fluctuate widely across time periods due to random variation (chance). **This count or rate is extremely unstable (RSE >0.50). This value should not be used to infer population risk.

Data Sources

  • Numerator: The New Mexico Tumor Registry, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, http://hsc.unm.edu/som/nmtr/.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).


Average Annual New Cervical Cancer Cases per 100,000 population (Females) by County, New Mexico, 2011-2015

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

CountyCases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 35
Bernalillo7.368.61261,722,717
Catron0038.6*Unstable08,785
Chaves6.12.210*Unstable10166,231
Cibola11.22.719.6*Unstable767,335
Colfax11.4025.3**Very Unstable332,697
Curry4.30.58.1*Unstable5121,680
De Baca0068.7*Unstable04,939
Dona Ana7.65.210.139547,007
Eddy10.34.116.5*Unstable11138,581
Grant3.30.46.1*Unstable574,232
Guadalupe0033.8*Unstable010,030
Harding00203.7*Unstable01,665
Hidalgo15044.5**Very Unstable111,666
Lea13.87.72020165,077
Lincoln11.70.922.5*Unstable651,774
Los Alamos6.5013.4**Very Unstable444,570
Luna5.5012.2**Very Unstable362,385
McKinley7.63.21212191,011
Mora0028.9*Unstable011,730
Otero10.35.215.417159,439
Quay7.6022.5**Very Unstable122,395
Rio Arriba8.52.414.7*Unstable8101,524
Roosevelt10.1020.2**Very Unstable450,296
Sandoval6.13.58.822348,958
San Juan6.33.49.120328,801
San Miguel11.33.319.3*Unstable972,446
Santa Fe4.126.218377,065
Sierra11.5028.2**Very Unstable329,147
Socorro8017.4**Very Unstable343,359
Taos10.12.917.3*Unstable984,698
Torrance16.8330.7*Unstable638,060
Union13.7033.1**Very Unstable29,552
Valencia9.44.814.117191,220
New Mexico7.368.61261,722,717
U.S.7.57.57.6U.S. data from CDC Wonder: 2011-201562,645803,266,518

Data Notes

Cervical cancer incidence is defined as new cases of malignant cancer of the cervix uteri.   Data have been directly age-adjusted to tthe U.S. 2000 Standard Population. *This rate is statistically unstable (.30 < RSE <= 0.50), and may fluctuate widely across time periods due to random variation (chance). **This count or rate is extremely unstable (RSE >0.50). This value should not be used to infer population risk.

Data Sources

  • Numerator: The New Mexico Tumor Registry, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, http://hsc.unm.edu/som/nmtr/.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).


Average Annual New Cervical Cancer Cases per 100,000 population (Females) By Age, New Mexico, 2011-2015

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Age GroupCases per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 10
Age 0-3432.33.7732,435,868
Age 35-4915.112.617.6142941,519
Age 50-64119131181,075,136
Age 65-796.54.58.540617,201
Age 80+8.14.411.918221,349

Data Notes

Cervical cancer incidence is defined as new cases of malignant cancer of the cervix uteri.

Data Sources

  • Numerator: The New Mexico Tumor Registry, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, http://hsc.unm.edu/som/nmtr/.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.


Average Annual New Cervical Cancer Cases per 100,000 population (Females) by Health Region, New Mexico, 2011-2015

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

New Mexico Health RegionCases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 7
Northwest7.35.09.639587,146
Northeast6.54.68.453745,978
Metro7.46.38.61712,300,955
Southeast9.06.611.457720,974
Southwest7.85.99.771936,021
New Mexico7.56.88.33915,291,074
US7.57.57.6U.S. data from CDC Wonder: 2011-201562,645803,266,518

Data Notes

Cervical cancer incidence is defined as new cases of malignant cancer of the cervix uteri.   Data have been directly age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 Standard Population.

Data Sources

  • Numerator: The New Mexico Tumor Registry, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, http://hsc.unm.edu/som/nmtr/.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).


Average Annual New Cervical Cancer Cases per 100,000 population (Females) by Urban and Rural Counties, New Mexico, 2011-2015

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Urban Versus Rural CountiesCases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 6
Metropolitan Counties7.46.38.61712,300,955
Small Metro Counties6.14.77.5771,252,873
Mixed Urban-Rural8.77.210.41241,499,504
Rural Counties9.14.613.619237,741
New Mexico7.56.88.33915,291,074
U.S.7.57.57.6U.S. data from CDC Wonder: 2011-201562,645803,266,518

Data Notes

Cervical cancer incidence is defined as new cases of malignant cancer of the cervix uteri.   Data have been directly age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 Standard Population.

Data Sources

  • Numerator: The New Mexico Tumor Registry, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, http://hsc.unm.edu/som/nmtr/.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).


Average Annual New Cervical Cancer Cases per 100,000 population (Females) by U.S. States, 2015

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

StateCases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 52
Alabama9.08.49.51,14812,434,320
Alaska7.05.78.41191,751,388
Arizona6.66.27.01,09116,686,987
Arkansas9.68.910.47297,527,040
California7.27.17.47,14496,473,279
Colorado5.95.56.480413,143,731
Connecticut6.66.17.26469,201,326
Delaware8.27.19.52062,387,966
District of Columbia9.78.211.41621,700,582
Florida8.78.59.04,73850,178,974
Georgia7.87.58.22,03625,602,013
Hawaii7.26.38.12583,495,512
Idaho6.15.36.92414,031,377
Illinois7.77.48.02,62832,741,282
Indiana7.87.48.21,30916,660,636
Iowa7.26.67.95547,786,515
Kansas7.66.98.35307,266,752
Kentucky8.88.39.41,00111,162,177
Louisiana9.08.59.61,07011,806,691
Maine5.95.16.82173,390,025
Maryland6.46.06.81,05315,278,403
Massachucetts5.14.85.594917,270,124
Michigan6.76.47.01,73625,184,325
Minnesota5.55.15.977113,622,676
Mississippi9.58.810.27387,681,243
Missouri8.37.98.81,30215,396,118
Montana6.45.57.51722,523,991
Nebraska7.66.88.53464,694,425
Nevada7.87.18.55566,943,883
New Hampshire4.84.15.61713,349,178
New Jersey7.67.27.91,90022,782,547
New Mexico7.66.88.43915,259,512
New York7.77.47.94,22050,613,521
North Carolina7.26.97.61,90825,270,538
North Dakota4.93.86.1851,766,066
Ohio7.67.38.02,33629,556,637
Oklahoma8.98.39.68409,710,622
Oregon6.86.37.46889,943,139
Pennsylvania7.47.27.82,58832,658,122
Rhode Island7.06.18.11962,716,431
South Carolina7.67.18.197412,277,276
South Dakota7.15.98.41472,096,190
Tennessee8.58.08.91,47016,647,506
Texas9.29.09.46,03366,782,188
Utah4.94.45.53067,211,845
Vermont4.43.45.6721,587,579
Virginia6.25.96.61,36720,973,326
Washington6.86.47.21,20517,493,103
West Virginia9.18.210.04424,682,484
Wisconsin6.35.96.895514,446,368
Wyoming6.85.58.4971,418,579
United States7.57.57.6U.S. data from CDC Wonder: 201562,645803,266,518

Data Notes

Cervical cancer incidence is defined as new cases of malignant cancer of the cervix uteri.

Data Source

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).

References and Community Resources

New Mexico Department of Health Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection (BCC) Program (http://archive.cancernm.org/bcc/index.html) U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, Cervical Cancer Screening website(https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/UpdateSummaryFinal/cervical-cancer-screening2) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/cervical/index.htm) Surveillance Epidemiology and End Result (SEER) Program (http://seer.cancer.gov/) New Mexico Tumor Registry (NMTR), University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, School of Medicine (http://nmtrweb.unm.edu/) National Cancer Institute (NCI) (www.cancer.gov) American Cancer Society (ACS) (www.cancer.org) New Mexico Cancer Council (NMCC) (http://www.nmcancercouncil.org/) Albuquerque Cancer Coalition (ACC) (https://acc.nmcca.org/) The National Library of Medicine (NLM) MedlinePlus (www.medlineplus.gov) Commission on Cancer (www.facs.org/quality-programs/cancer) Cancer Control P.L.A.N.E.T. (http://cancercontrolplanet.cancer.gov/) The Guide to Community Preventive Services (http://www.thecommunityguide.org/cancer/index.html) Research-tested Intervetion Programs (RTIPs) (http://rtips.cancer.gov/rtips/index.do)

More Resources and Links

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

Page Content Updated On 01/02/2019, Published on 01/03/2019
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Sun, 16 June 2019 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Thu, 3 Jan 2019 11:44:19 MST