Skip directly to searchSkip directly to the site navigationSkip directly to the page's main content

Complete Health Indicator Report of Cancer Incidence - Colorectal Cancer

Definition

New cases of colorectal cancer per 100,000 population in New Mexico

Numerator

Number of new colorectal cancer cases in New Mexico

Denominator

New Mexico population

Why Is This Important?

Of cancers that affect both men and women, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of new cancer cases and cancer deaths in New Mexico. Colorectal cancer screening can significantly reduce colorectal cancer mortality through early detection, when treatment tends to be most effective. Colorectal cancer screening can also actually prevent colorectal cancer by detecting and removing polyps in the colon or rectum that could become cancers in the future.

Healthy People Objective: C-9, Reduce invasive colorectal cancer

U.S. Target: 38.6 new cases per 100,000 population

Other Objectives

Other relevant HP2020 objectives: C-16: Increase the proportion of adults who receive a colorectal cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines

How Are We Doing?

In New Mexico, the colorectal cancer incidence rate was stable from 1975-2004, but has been decreasing since then. Over the most recent 5-year period (2011-2015), the overall New Mexico colorectal cancer incidence rate of 33.1 new cases per 100,000 population is lower than the Healthy People 2020 goal of 40.0.

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

Historically, New Mexico has had a lower colorectal cancer incidence rate than the U.S. However, over the past several decades the rate of new cases of colorectal cancer has decreased more rapidly in the U.S. as a whole compared to New Mexico and the overall New Mexico colorectal cancer incidence rate is now more similar to the U.S. colorectal cancer incidence rate.

What Is Being Done?

A goal of the New Mexico Department of Health Comprehensive Cancer Control Program is to reduce deaths from colorectal cancer in New Mexico by promoting evidence-based public health initiatives designed to increase the overall rate of New Mexicans ages 50-75 years who are appropriately screened for colorectal cancer. To this end, the Comprehensive Cancer Program supports health care providers and health systems across the state in using patient reminders, risk assessment tools, reducing structural barriers (e.g., expanding clinic hours), provider reminder and recall systems, and provider assessment and feedback on performance. All of these activities have been shown to increase colorectal cancer screening rates, and are recommended by The Guide to Community Preventive Services, a collection of evidence-based findings of the Community Preventive Services Task Force, established by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Evidence-based Practices

In June 2016, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) released its updated colorectal cancer screening recommendation, which continues to recommend screening average risk adults ages 50-75 years in order to reduce colorectal cancer deaths. The updated recommendation addressed some of the same screening methods endorsed by the previous (2008) USPSTF recommendation, including annual testing with a take-home kit using either a high-sensitivity guaiac-based fecal occult blood test (FOBT) or fecal immunochemical test (FIT), or having a colonoscopy every ten years. The updated recommendation also reviewed evidence for methods of screening not previously endorsed, including flexible sigmoidoscopy every ten years plus annual FIT; CT colonography or flexible sigmoidoscopy every five years; or testing every one or three years with a FIT-DNA test. Of note, the USPSTF found no head-to-head studies demonstrating that any of these screening strategies are more effective than others, although they have varying levels of evidence supporting their effectiveness, as well as different strengths and limitations. Unlike its previous recommendations for colorectal cancer screening, the USPSTF's updated recommendation does not endorse a specific list of screening options. Rather, it notes that the risks and benefits of these screening methods vary considerably in terms of frequency, cost, availability, single-test accuracy, convenience, and potential serious complication - leaving it up to clinicians and patients to use this information to choose a screening method. A modeling study included in the updated 2016 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations predicted that using any one of the following four screening strategies will have a comparable balance of life-years gained, potential harmful complications, and screening burden, assuming 100% adherence: annual FIT; flexible sigmoidoscopy every ten years plus annual FIT; CT colonography every five years, or colonoscopy every ten years.

Available Services

The Department of Health's Comprehensive Cancer Program offers cancer education, information and resources to the public and healthcare providers. Contact the Program at: New Mexico Department of Health - Comprehensive Cancer Program 5301 Central Ave. NE, Suite 800 Albuquerque, NM 87108 Phone Number: 505-841-5847 Website: http://archive.cancernm.org/ccp/


Related Indicators

Related Relevant Population Characteristics Indicators:


Related Health Care System Factors Indicators:


Risk Factors

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, risk factors for colorectal cancer include: older age (>50 years); having inflammatory bowel disease such as Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis; personal or family history of colorectal cancer or colorectal polyps; genetic syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) or hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome). Lifestyle factors that may also contribute to an increased risk of colorectal cancer include: a lack of regular physical activity, a diet that's high in red and processed meats, being overweight or obese, heavy alcohol consumption and tobacco use.

Related Risk Factors Indicators:


Related Health Status Outcomes Indicators:




Graphical Data Views

New Colorectal Cancer Cases per 100,000 Population by Year, New Mexico and U.S., 2000-2015

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

NM vs. U.S.YearCases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 32
New Mexico200043.640.546.77521,828,596
New Mexico200142.539.545.67581,851,525
New Mexico200242.039.044.97701,874,593
New Mexico200343.540.546.58171,897,658
New Mexico200443.240.346.28361,920,756
New Mexico200540.637.843.58021,943,827
New Mexico200641.738.944.68481,966,890
New Mexico200740.537.843.38491,989,996
New Mexico200838.435.841.18202,013,064
New Mexico200937.635.040.28332,036,124
New Mexico201036.233.738.78202,065,194
New Mexico201135.933.538.48352,081,550
New Mexico201233.030.635.47662,092,246
New Mexico201332.730.435.07862,096,134
New Mexico201432.630.334.97992,099,510
New Mexico201531.629.433.97992,102,646
United States200055.855.556.1151,661275,879,626
United States200154.954.655.2153,539282,115,961
United States200253.653.453.9152,519284,766,512
United States200352.652.452.9153,870290,107,933
United States200451.150.951.4152,044292,805,298
United States200549.849.550.0150,750295,312,662
United States200648.348.048.5148,944298,379,912
United States200747.146.847.3148,395301,231,207
United States200845.845.646.1147,467304,093,966
United States200943.743.544.0143,584306,771,529
United States201041.741.542.0139,873309,348,193
United States201140.940.641.1139,540311,663,358
United States201239.739.539.9138,546313,998,379
United States201339.038.839.2139,292316,204,908
United States201438.838.639.0141,581318,563,456
United States201538.037.838.2140,788320,896,618

Data Notes

Colorectal cancer incidence is defined as new cases of malignant neoplasm of the colon, rectosigmoid junction, or rectum.   Data have been age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Sources

  • Numerator: The New Mexico Tumor Registry, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, http://hsc.unm.edu/som/nmtr/.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).


Average Annual New Cases of Colorectal Cancer per 100,000 Population by Sex, New Mexico 2011-2015

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Sex, M/FCases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 3
Total33.132.134.23,98510,472,086
Male38.136.439.72,1365,181,012
Female28.827.530.21,848529,107

Data Notes

Colorectal cancer incidence is defined as new cases of malignant neoplasm of the colon, rectosigmoid junction, or rectum.   Data are age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Sources

  • Numerator: The New Mexico Tumor Registry, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, http://hsc.unm.edu/som/nmtr/.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.


Average Annual New Colorectal Cancer Cases per 100,000 Population by Race/Ethnicity, New Mexico, 2011-2015

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Race/EthnicityCases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 7
American Indian/Alaska Native4338.247.8328937,291
Asian/Pacific Islander3121.840.247166,826
Black/African American3425.442.663218,767
Hispanic33.531.735.21,4244,970,891
White32.330.833.82,1074,178,310
New Mexico33.132.134.23,98510,472,086
United States39.239.139.3U.S. data from CDC Wonder: 2011-2015699,7471,581,326,719

Data Notes

Colorectal cancer incidence is defined as new cases of malignant neoplasm of the colon, rectosigmoid junction, or rectum.   Data have been age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Sources

  • Numerator: The New Mexico Tumor Registry, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, http://hsc.unm.edu/som/nmtr/.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).


Average Annual New Colorectal Cancer Cases per 100,000 Population by County, New Mexico, 2011-2015

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

CountyCases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 35
Bernalillo33.231.335.11,2363,377,733
Catron26.410.542.2*Unstable1218,435
Chaves29.023.434.5109330,206
Cibola49.237.860.674137,152
Colfax36.725.647.84366,550
Curry32.725.240.275250,245
De Baca32.86.459.2*Unstable69,788
Dona Ana32.729.336.13671,074,788
Eddy31.625.338.098278,485
Grant33.025.240.877146,532
Guadalupe38.316.659.91222,923
Harding50.50.0101.1**Very Unstable43,456
Hidalgo56.027.384.81623,447
Lea35.128.541.7110339,602
Lincoln28.018.937.146101,720
Los Alamos27.817.837.83189,968
Luna41.331.451.172124,464
McKinley38.631.845.4130370,246
Mora28.610.946.4*Unstable1123,960
Otero32.827.038.6128326,076
Quay43.927.960.03143,736
Rio Arriba39.331.247.496199,982
Roosevelt35.923.548.234100,662
Sandoval35.431.239.7279683,852
San Juan29.925.634.1200650,875
San Miguel40.631.449.978143,791
Santa Fe26.723.330.0271734,498
Sierra30.819.342.43758,311
Socorro35.323.946.63988,354
Taos27.120.533.770166,193
Torrance35.123.347.03879,740
Union9.30.019.9**Very Unstable322,343
Valencia34.628.940.3149383,974
New Mexico33.132.134.23,98510,472,086
U.S.39.239.139.3U.S. data from CDC Wonder: 2011-2015699,7471,581,326,719

Data Notes

Colorectal cancer incidence is defined as new cases of malignant neoplasm of the colon, rectosigmoid junction, or rectum.   Data are age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. *This rate is statistically unstable (.30 < RSE <= 0.50), and may fluctuate widely across time periods due to random variation (chance). **This count or rate is extremely unstable (RSE >0.50). This value should not be used to infer population risk.

Data Sources

  • Numerator: The New Mexico Tumor Registry, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, http://hsc.unm.edu/som/nmtr/.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).


Average Annual New Colorectal Cancer Cases per 100,000 Population by Age Group, New Mexico, 2011-2015

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Age GroupCases per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 5
Age 0-341.20.91.6624,988,316
Age 35-4918.616.720.63491,873,261
Age 50-6466.563.070.01,3792,073,555
Age 65-79124.2117.8130.61,4471,165,465
Age 80+201.4186.9215.8748371,490

Data Notes

Colorectal cancer incidence is defined as new cases of malignant neoplasm of the colon, rectosigmoid junction, or rectum.

Data Sources

  • Numerator: The New Mexico Tumor Registry, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, http://hsc.unm.edu/som/nmtr/.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.


Average Annual New Colorectal Cancer Cases per 100,000 Population by Health Region, New Mexico, 2011-2015

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

New Mexico Health RegionCases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 7
Northwest35.131.638.64041,158,273
Northeast30.227.732.66191,473,665
Metro33.632.035.31,7024,525,298
Southeast32.329.435.25091,454,443
Southwest33.731.236.17481,860,407
New Mexico33.132.134.23,98510,472,086
US39.239.139.3U.S. data from CDC Wonder: 2011-2015699,7471,581,326,719

Data Notes

Colorectal cancer incidence is defined as new cases of malignant neoplasm of the colon, rectosigmoid junction, or rectum.   Data are age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Sources

  • Numerator: The New Mexico Tumor Registry, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, http://hsc.unm.edu/som/nmtr/.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).


Average Annual New Colorectal Cancer Cases per 100,000 Population by Urban and Rural Counties, New Mexico, 2011-2015

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Urban Versus Rural CountiesCases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 6
Metropolitan Counties33.632.035.31,7024,525,298
Small Metro Counties29.827.731.98382,460,161
Mixed Urban-Rural34.832.836.91,1823,003,604
Rural Counties33.028.737.2260483,023
New Mexico33.132.134.23,98510,472,086
U.S.39.239.139.3U.S. data from CDC Wonder: 2011-2015699,7471,581,326,719

Data Notes

Colorectal cancer incidence is defined as new cases of malignant neoplasm of the colon, rectosigmoid junction, or rectum.   Data are age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Sources

  • Numerator: The New Mexico Tumor Registry, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, http://hsc.unm.edu/som/nmtr/.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).


Average Annual New Colorectal Cancer Cases per 100,000 Population by U.S. States, 2015

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

StateCases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 52
Alabama42.741.044.52,4934,853,875
Alaska42.537.448.0294737,709
Arizona31.830.633.12,5836,817,565
Arkansas45.042.847.41,5822,977,853
California35.034.435.614,62038,993,940
Colorado32.931.434.51,8925,448,819
Connecticut35.333.537.11,5783,584,730
Delaware39.435.743.3457944,076
District of Columbia31.026.835.7202670,377
Florida34.934.235.69,69620,244,914
Georgia41.740.443.04,47710,199,398
Hawaii41.338.244.67131,425,157
Idaho35.332.538.26451,652,828
Illinois42.841.743.96,25112,839,047
Indiana41.640.143.13,1336,612,768
Iowa43.641.545.81,6723,121,997
Kansas38.336.240.61,2682,906,721
Kentucky48.446.550.42,5154,424,611
Louisiana44.442.646.32,3104,668,960
Maine35.732.938.66691,329,453
Maryland36.034.537.52,4445,994,983
Massachucetts35.534.236.92,8726,784,240
Michigan35.434.336.54,2749,917,715
Minnesota38.436.840.02,4085,482,435
Mississippi48.145.750.51,6582,989,390
Missouri39.838.341.32,8966,076,204
Montana38.935.542.65071,032,073
Nebraska42.840.045.79191,893,765
Nevada32.330.434.41,0552,883,758
New Hampshire36.033.139.25941,330,111
New Jersey40.539.341.84,3148,935,421
New Mexico31.729.434.07942,080,328
New York38.737.939.58,96419,747,183
North Carolina37.336.238.54,37710,035,186
North Dakota42.437.947.2354756,835
Ohio42.341.243.55,99311,605,090
Oklahoma40.838.942.71,7983,907,414
Oregon31.930.333.61,5644,024,634
Pennsylvania41.940.942.96,87212,791,904
Rhode Island31.828.735.24111,055,607
South Carolina39.738.041.42,3204,894,834
South Dakota40.036.144.3400857,919
Tennessee39.738.341.23,1066,595,056
Texas37.536.838.310,13727,429,639
Utah27.925.930.17122,990,632
Vermont33.829.838.3277626,088
Virginia33.732.534.93,1828,367,587
Washington33.532.334.92,7047,160,290
West Virginia47.144.350.01,1461,841,053
Wisconsin35.834.437.32,4865,767,891
Wyoming30.326.135.0200586,555
United States38.037.838.2U.S. data from CDC Wonder: 2015140,788320,896,618

Data Notes

Colorectal cancer incidence is defined as new cases of malignant neoplasm of the colon, rectosigmoid junction, or rectum.

Data Source

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC WONDER Online Database (http://wonder.cdc.gov).

References and Community Resources

New Mexico Department of Health Comprehensive Cancer Program (http://archive.cancernm.org/ccp/) United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) (https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/UpdateSummaryFinal/colorectal-cancer-screening2) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal/index.htm) National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (http://nccrt.org/) Surveillance Epidemiology and End Result (SEER) Program (http://seer.cancer.gov/) New Mexico Tumor Registry (NMTR), University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, School of Medicine (http://nmtrweb.unm.edu/) National Cancer Institute (NCI) (www.cancer.gov) American Cancer Society (ACS) (www.cancer.org) New Mexico Cancer Council (NMCC) (http://www.nmcancercouncil.org/) Albuquerque Cancer Coalition (ACC) (https://acc.nmcca.org/) The National Library of Medicine (NLM) MedlinePlus (www.medlineplus.gov) Commission on Cancer (www.facs.org/quality-programs/cancer) Cancer Control P.L.A.N.E.T. (http://cancercontrolplanet.cancer.gov/) The Guide to Community Preventive Services (http://www.thecommunityguide.org/cancer/index.html) Research-tested Intervetion Programs (RTIPs) (http://rtips.cancer.gov/rtips/index.do)

More Resources and Links

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

Page Content Updated On 01/02/2019, Published on 01/03/2019
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Sat, 17 August 2019 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Thu, 3 Jan 2019 13:18:42 MST