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Complete Health Indicator Report of Cardiovascular Disease - Heart Disease Deaths

Definition

Diseases of the heart include a variety of conditions that may affect different parts of the heart, including the blood supply, the heart muscle, the internal lining and valves, the conduction system, and the membrane that surrounds the heart. Common causes of death from diseases of the heart include myocardial infarction (heart attack), heart failure, and cardiac arrest.

Numerator

Number of heart disease deaths

Denominator

New Mexico Population

Why Is This Important?

In 2016, heart disease was the leading cause of death in New Mexico and accounts for over 20% of all deaths.

Healthy People Objective: Reduce coronary heart disease deaths

U.S. Target: 103.4 deaths per 100,000 population

Other Objectives

New Mexico Community Health Status Indicator (CHSI)

How Are We Doing?

Generally, overall heart disease death rates have been decreasing for decades. However, heart disease and cancer deaths remain the top two leading causes of death in NM and the US. Age and Sex. As is typical with chronic diseases, death rates increased as age increased, with a steep increase in the oldest age group (85+ years). The 2016 male rates were higher than female rates in each age group. Race/Ethnicity: Heart disease mortality varied greatly by race and ethnicity. During the 3-year period 2014-2016, the rate for Black or African Americans, 187.5 per 100,000, was statistically significantly higher than that of all other race/ethnic groups. The next highest rate, that of whites, 149.7 per 100,000, was statistically significantly different than all remaining race/ethnic groups. The rates for American Indians and Hispanics were essentially the same. The population with the lowest heart disease mortality rate was the Asian/Pacific Islander group, with a 3-year age-adjusted rate of 84.4 per 100,000. This rate was statistically significantly different from those of all other groups. County: During the period 2014-2016, heart disease mortality rate varied by county. The six counties with the highest rates, all above 200 per 100,000, were Sierra, Lea, Luna, Torrance, Chaves, and Curry counties. The six counties with the lowest rates, all below 120 per 100,000, were Taos, Mora, Los Alamos, Catron, Santa Fe, and Lincoln. Urban and Rural: NM counties were designated into four groups of urbanicity and rurality, using the National Center for Health Statistics classification scheme. For 2014-2016, heart disease mortality rates were highest and similar in Mixed Urban/Rural and Rural counties, and lowest in Metro and Small Metro counties. The heart disease mortality rate for Small Metro counties was statistically significantly lower than all other Urban/Rural categories.

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

US and NM: NM rates were consistently lower than US rates. Rates continue to decrease in US, as a whole. NM rates have remained essentially flat for the past eight years but these rates are slightly lower than the rates of ten years ago. Over the past ten years, an average 3343 heart disease deaths occurred annually in NM. Rates for the nation have been decreasing since the 1950s. Decreases in mean blood pressure levels, mean blood cholesterol levels and smoking, as well as improvements in medical care have contributed to this decline in death rates. However, heart disease and stroke remain leading causes of disability and death. (Achievements in Public Health, 1900-1999: Decline in Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke -- United States, 1900-1999. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.) ]

What Is Being Done?

The NM Department of Health Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention (HDSP) Program works with health systems, health care providers, community partners, agencies and coalitions to provide awareness of and education about heart disease and stroke prevention strategies. Program strategies are focused on providing professional education to members of the health care team about the importance of reporting standardized hypertension and diabetes quality measures to reporting bodies using electronic health record (EHR) data; partnering with EHR data experts to provide technical assistance to health systems on how to extract necessary data from the EHR to be able to report quality measures; working with health systems to identify potential errors in entering EHR data that may affect quality reporting; using EHR data to identify patients with undiagnosed hypertension commonly referred to as those ?hiding in plain sight;? partnering with the NM Department of Health Diabetes Prevention and Control Program (DPCP) to provide resources and programs for patients to manage their hypertension and diabetes; promoting the value of community health workers as members of the healthcare team; promoting and educating about the importance of using a team-based healthcare model; partnering with NM Medicaid to extract and analyze prescription fill data for diabetes and hypertensive medications; use Million Hearts and American Heart Association resources to promote and educate about self-measured blood pressure monitoring tied with clinical support. The HDSP program's partners support build environment improvements so people at risk for or with cardiovascular disease and stroke can be physically active and initiatives that increase access to healthy foods. The HDSP program consults with populations that are disproportionately affected by cardiovascular disease and stroke and/or those that serve them to develop education and services that are culturally appropriate to these populations.

Evidence-based Practices

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites: - The Guide to Community Preventive Services - Health Indicators Warehouse - County Health Rankings - Healthy People 2020 Website Heart Disease and its complications can be prevented and managed through these strategies: # Clinical decision-support systems designed to assist healthcare providers in implementing clinical guidelines at the point of care. # Reducing out-of-pocket costs (ROPC) for patients with high blood pressure and high cholesterol. # Team-Based Care to Improve Blood Pressure Control. CDC recommends specific major activities to implement these three effective strategies. 1) Clinical decision-support systems (CDSS) designed to assist healthcare providers in implementing clinical guidelines at the point of care. * Implementation of CDSS at clinics and sites that provide healthcare services along with providing technical assistance on proper use of these systems. * CDSS for cardiovascular disease prevention (CVD) include one or more of the following: ** Reminders for overdue CVD preventive services including screening for risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes, and high cholesterol ** Assessments of patients' risk for developing CVD based on their medical history, symptoms, and clinical test results ** Recommendations for evidence-based treatments to prevent CVD, including intensification of treatment ** Recommendations for health behavior changes to discuss with patients such as quitting smoking, increasing physical activity, and reducing excessive salt intake ** Alerts when indicators for CVD risk factors are not at goal[[br]] 2) Reducing out-of-pocket costs (ROPC) for patients with high blood pressure and high cholesterol. * Reducing out-of-pocket costs involves program and policy changes that make cardiovascular disease preventive services more affordable. These services include: ** Medications ** Behavioral counseling (e.g. nutrition counseling) ** Behavioral support (e.g. community-based weight management programs, gym membership) * Encouraging the delivery of preventive services in clinical and non-clinical settings (e.g. worksite, community). * Promoting interventions that enhance patient-provider interaction such as team-based care, medication counseling, and patient education. * Increasing awareness of covered services to providers and to patients with high blood pressure and high cholesterol using targeted messages. * Work with diabetes management and tobacco cessation programs to coordinate coverage for blood pressure and cholesterol management. [[br]] 3) Team-Based Care to Improve Blood Pressure Control. * Team-based care to improve blood pressure control is a health systems-level, organizational intervention that incorporates a multidisciplinary team to improve the quality of hypertension care for patients. * Provide technical assistance to facilitate communication and coordination of care support among various team members including the patient, the patient?s primary care provider, nurses, pharmacists, dietitians, social workers, and community health workers. * Enhance the use of evidence-based guidelines by team members. * Actively engage patients and populations at risk in their own care by providing educational materials, medication adherence support, and tools and resources for self-management (including health behavior change).


Related Indicators

Related Relevant Population Characteristics Indicators:


Risk Factors

Risk factors for heart disease include: high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol, prediabetes, diabetes, tobacco use, secondhand smoke exposure, physical inactivity, poor nutrition and excess weight. Controlling and preventing these risk factors is crucial in reducing risk of developing heart disease as well as death from heart disease.

Related Risk Factors Indicators:




Graphical Data Views

Heart Disease Deaths per 100,000 population by Year, New Mexico and U.S., 1999-2016

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confidence limits

The New Mexico age-adjusted heart disease death rate has remained relatively stable for the past decade.
NM vs. U.S.YearDeaths per 100,000 Population - Age AdjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 36
New Mexico1999208.2201.3215.23,3671,798,161
New Mexico2000191.2184.6197.83,1831,828,596
New Mexico2001195.6189.0202.13,3391,851,525
New Mexico2002178.7172.5184.93,1491,874,593
New Mexico2003174.4168.4180.53,1451,897,658
New Mexico2004170.9165.0176.83,1611,920,756
New Mexico2005178.1172.2184.13,3761,943,827
New Mexico2006171.9166.1177.73,3311,966,890
New Mexico2007163.6158.0169.23,2631,989,996
New Mexico2008155.4150.0160.83,1742,013,064
New Mexico2009150.7145.4155.93,1522,036,124
New Mexico2010148.4143.3153.63,1862,065,194
New Mexico2011148.0142.9153.03,2752,083,725
New Mexico2012145.4140.5150.43,3062,091,432
New Mexico2013144.7139.8149.63,3852,095,156
New Mexico2014141.8137.0146.63,4082,098,381
New Mexico2015141.3136.6146.03,5082,099,856
New Mexico2016148.3143.6153.13,7772,103,586
United States1999266.5
United States2000257.6
United States2001249.5
United States2002244.6
United States2003236.3
United States2004221.6
United States2005216.8
United States2006205.5
United States2007196.1
United States2008192.1
United States2009182.8
United States2010179.1
United States2011173.7
United States2012170.5
United States2013169.8
United States2014167.0614,348318,857,056
United States2015168.5633,842

Data Notes

Heart disease mortality is defined as circulatory, Heart disease (ICD10: I00-I09, I11, I13, I20-I51). Some rows in data tables may include a note of Unstable or Very Unstable. Those rates labeled Unstable were statistically unstable (RSE >0.30 and <0.50), and may fluctuate widely across time periods due to random variation (chance). Those rates labeled Very Unstable were extremely unstable (RSE >0.50). These values should not be used to infer population risk.   Data have been directly age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. Data for the United States were obtained from the CDC/National Center for Health Statistics mortality data reports, available online at www.cdc.gov/nchs/deaths.htm.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • U.S. Data Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/.


Average Annual Heart Disease Deaths per 100,000 Population by Sex, New Mexico, 2014-2016

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confidence limits

The age-adjusted heart disease mortality rate of males was 66% higher than that of females.
Sex, M/FDeaths per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 3
Male183.4178.7188.15,9993,123,521
Female110.3107.1113.54,6943,178,302
Total143.8141.1146.610,6936,301,823

Data Notes

Heart disease mortality is defined as circulatory, Heart disease (ICD10: I00-I09, I11, I13, I20-I51). Some rows in data tables may include a note of Unstable or Very Unstable. Those rates labeled Unstable were statistically unstable (RSE >0.30 and <0.50), and may fluctuate widely across time periods due to random variation (chance). Those rates labeled Very Unstable were extremely unstable (RSE >0.50). These values should not be used to infer population risk.   3-year average age-adjusted mortality rate, directly age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.


Average Annual Heart Disease Deaths per 100,000 Population by Age Group, New Mexico, 2014-2016

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Age is associated with heart disease and death due to heart disease. Rates for each age group were statistically different from the rate for the preceding age group.
Age GroupDeaths per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 8
15-241.20.41.9Unstable10872,565
25-346.64.98.456846,562
35-4421.518.124.8158735,151
45-5474.668.580.6581779,377
55-64162.4153.7171.11,333820,964
65-74326.8312.3341.41,929590,202
75-84900.4866.2934.52,642293,437
85+3,411.63,307.23,515.93,968116,310

Data Notes

Heart disease mortality is defined as circulatory, Heart disease (ICD10: I00-I09, I11, I13, I20-I51). Some rows in data tables may include a note of Unstable or Very Unstable. Those rates labeled Unstable were statistically unstable (RSE >0.30 and <0.50), and may fluctuate widely across time periods due to random variation (chance). Those rates labeled Very Unstable were extremely unstable (RSE >0.50). These values should not be used to infer population risk.   Some rows in data tables may include a note of Unstable or Very Unstable. Those rates labeled Unstable were statistically unstable (RSE >0.30 and <0.50), and may fluctuate widely across time periods due to random variation (chance). Those rates labeled Very Unstable were extremely unstable (RSE >0.50). These values should not be used to infer population risk. Some Very Unstable rates have been suppressed.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.


Heart Disease Deaths per 100,000 Population* by Age Group and Sex, New Mexico, 2014-2016

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confidence limits

Age and sex are associated with heart disease mortality rates. The heart disease mortality rate for males was higher than that of females. Aside from the youngest age group presented, the heart disease mortality rate is higher for each older age group. Within each age group, the heart disease mortality rate for males was higher than the respective rate for females.
Sex: Males vs. FemalesAge GroupDeaths per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 24
Male15-241.10.12.1Unstable5452,836
Male25-3410.17.113.044436,884
Male35-4433.427.539.2123368,800
Male45-54110.6100.1121.2423382,287
Male55-64242.7227.3358.1951391,795
Male65-74458.5433.4483.51,284280,070
Male75-841,124.11,067.41,180.91,488132,367
Male85+3,833.63,653.44,013.71,67343,641
Female15-241.20.22.2Unstable5419,729
Female25-342.91.34.612409,678
Female35-449.66.412.735366,351
Female45-5439.833.646.0158397,090
Female55-6489.080.197.9382429,168
Female65-74208.0191.9224.0645310,132
Female75-84716.5675.3757.61,154161,069
Female85+3,158.13,031.03,285.32,29572,669
All15-241.20.41.9Unstable10872,565
All25-346.64.98.456846,562
All35-4421.518.124.8158735,151
All45-5474.668.580.6581779,377
All55-64162.4153.7171.11,333820,964
All65-74326.8312.3341.41,929590,202
All75-84900.4866.2934.52,642293,437
All85+3,411.63,307.23,515.93,968116,310

Data Notes

Heart disease mortality is defined as circulatory, Heart disease (ICD10: I00-I09, I11, I13, I20-I51). Some rows in data tables may include a note of Unstable or Very Unstable. Those rates labeled Unstable were statistically unstable (RSE >0.30 and <0.50), and may fluctuate widely across time periods due to random variation (chance). Those rates labeled Very Unstable were extremely unstable (RSE >0.50). These values should not be used to infer population risk.   Some rows in data tables may include a note of Unstable or Very Unstable. Those rates labeled Unstable were statistically unstable (RSE >0.30 and <0.50), and may fluctuate widely across time periods due to random variation (chance). Those rates labeled Very Unstable were extremely unstable (RSE >0.50). These values should not be used to infer population risk. Some Very Unstable rates have been suppressed.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.


Heart Disease Deaths per 100,000 Population by Race/Ethnicity, New Mexico, 2014-2016

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Heart disease mortality varied greatly by race and ethnicity. During the 3-year period 2014-2016, the rate for Black or African Americans, 187.5 per 100,000, was statistically significantly higher than that of all other race/ethnic groups. The next highest rate, that of whites, 149.7 per 100,000, was statistically significantly different than all remaining race/ethnic groups. The rates for American Indians and Hispanics were essentially the same. The population with the lowest heart disease mortality rate was the Asian/Pacific Islander group, with a 3-year age-adjusted rate of 84.4 per 100,000. This rate was statistically significantly different from those of all other groups.
Race/EthnicityDeaths per 100,000 Population - Age AdjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 7
American Indian/Alaska Native127.6116.4138.8518553,273
Asian/Pacific Islander84.464.1104.869105,837
Black/African American187.5162.0213.0215138,751
Hispanic133.9129.4138.53,3753,027,587
White149.7146.0153.56,4612,476,375
New Mexico143.8141.1146.610,6936,301,823
United States168.5U.S. value is from 2015

Data Notes

Heart disease mortality is defined as circulatory, Heart disease (ICD10: I00-I09, I11, I13, I20-I51). Some rows in data tables may include a note of Unstable or Very Unstable. Those rates labeled Unstable were statistically unstable (RSE >0.30 and <0.50), and may fluctuate widely across time periods due to random variation (chance). Those rates labeled Very Unstable were extremely unstable (RSE >0.50). These values should not be used to infer population risk.   Data have been directly age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. Some rows in data tables may include a note of Unstable or Very Unstable. Those rates labeled Unstable were statistically unstable (RSE >0.30 and <0.50), and may fluctuate widely across time periods due to random variation (chance). Those rates labeled Very Unstable were extremely unstable (RSE >0.50). These values should not be used to infer population risk. Some Very Unstable rates have been suppressed.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • U.S. Data Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/.


Heart Disease Deaths per 100,000 Population by Race/Ethnicity and Sex, New Mexico, 2014-2016

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Within each male/female gender group, the relationship of Race/Ethnicity looked much like the over-all Race/Ethnicity heart disease mortality, with Black/African Americans having the highest rate, whites next, American Indian and Hispanics having similar rates, and Asian/Pacific Islander males or females having the lowest rates. Across all Race/Ethnicity groups, males had higher rates than females.
Sex: Males vs. FemalesRace/EthnicityDeaths per 100,000 Population - Age AdjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 17
MaleAmerican Indian/Alaska Native186.4164.5208.3307265,711
MaleAsian/Pacific Islander101.764.4138.93248,518
MaleBlack/African American228.4186.3270.613077,534
MaleHispanic171.4163.7179.21,9411,503,942
MaleWhite187.6181.2193.93,5461,227,816
FemaleAmerican Indian/Alaska Native88.376.3100.4211287,562
FemaleAsian/Pacific Islander73.449.697.23757,318
FemaleBlack/African American142.7112.1173.38561,217
FemaleHispanic102.096.7107.31,4341,523,645
FemaleWhite117.0112.6121.42,9151,248,559
AllAmerican Indian/Alaska Native127.6116.4138.8518553,273
AllAsian/Pacific Islander84.464.1104.869105,837
AllBlack/African American187.5162.0213.0215138,751
AllHispanic133.9129.4138.53,3753,027,587
AllWhite149.7146.0153.56,4612,476,375
AllNew Mexico143.8141.1146.62014-2016 rate10,6936,301,823
AllUnited States168.52015 rate633,842

Data Notes

Heart disease mortality is defined as circulatory, Heart disease (ICD10: I00-I09, I11, I13, I20-I51). Some rows in data tables may include a note of Unstable or Very Unstable. Those rates labeled Unstable were statistically unstable (RSE >0.30 and <0.50), and may fluctuate widely across time periods due to random variation (chance). Those rates labeled Very Unstable were extremely unstable (RSE >0.50). These values should not be used to infer population risk.   Data have been directly age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. Some rows in data tables may include a note of Unstable or Very Unstable. Those rates labeled Unstable were statistically unstable (RSE >0.30 and <0.50), and may fluctuate widely across time periods due to random variation (chance). Those rates labeled Very Unstable were extremely unstable (RSE >0.50). These values should not be used to infer population risk. Some Very Unstable rates have been suppressed.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • U.S. Data Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/.


Heart Disease Deaths per 100,000 Population by County, New Mexico, 2014-2016

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

The heart disease mortality rate varied by county, from a high of 242.8 per 100,000 in Sierra County to a low of 99.1 per 100,000 in Taos County. The six counties with the highest rates, all above 200 per 100,000, in descending order, were Sierra, Lea, Luna, Torrance, Chaves, and Curry counties. The six counties with the lowest rates, all below 120 per 100,000, in ascending order, were Taos, Mora, Los Alamos, Catron, Santa Fe, and Lincoln.
CountyDeaths per 100,000 Population - Age AdjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 35
Bernalillo138.0133.2142.83,2212,039,545
Catron111.062.8159.32610,920
Chaves209.4190.8227.9496198,570
Cibola151.5126.0177.113882,854
Colfax155.1124.0186.210438,834
Curry205.0181.8228.3295152,020
De Baca196.3111.6281.0205,706
Dona Ana120.4112.4128.4866649,891
Eddy195.0175.2214.7378171,440
Grant160.1139.2181.024887,603
Guadalupe138.584.1192.82613,495
Harding**Very Unstable2,075
Hidalgo120.474.0166.82613,662
Lea216.0194.4237.6386209,683
Lincoln117.895.7139.912360,168
Los Alamos108.285.0131.48554,118
Luna214.7186.8242.623774,368
McKinley129.7113.2146.2242223,347
Mora107.262.2152.12514,124
Otero168.5152.0185.0403196,554
Quay161.4122.8200.16825,694
Rio Arriba132.0112.7151.3186119,620
Roosevelt162.8130.4195.29859,205
Sandoval128.8118.3139.2593148,999
San Juan128.1117.0139.2515372,857
San Miguel168.5144.4192.619384,896
Santa Fe113.2104.6121.7695444,981
Sierra242.8202.9282.818734,292
Socorro171.3138.1204.410652,450
Taos99.183.0115.1156100,299
Torrance211.8173.6249.912547,166
Union138.187.7188.52913,164
Valencia150.9135.8166.1389229,243
NM143.8141.1146.610,6936,301,823
US168.52015633,842

Data Notes

Heart disease mortality is defined as circulatory, Heart disease (ICD10: I00-I09, I11, I13, I20-I51). Some rows in data tables may include a note of Unstable or Very Unstable. Those rates labeled Unstable were statistically unstable (RSE >0.30 and <0.50), and may fluctuate widely across time periods due to random variation (chance). Those rates labeled Very Unstable were extremely unstable (RSE >0.50). These values should not be used to infer population risk.   Data have been directly age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. Some rows in data tables may include a note of Unstable or Very Unstable. Those rates labeled Unstable were statistically unstable (RSE >0.30 and <0.50), and may fluctuate widely across time periods due to random variation (chance). Those rates labeled Very Unstable were extremely unstable (RSE >0.50). These values should not be used to infer population risk. Some Very Unstable rates have been suppressed.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • U.S. Data Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/.


Average Annual Heart Disease Deaths per 100,000 Population by Urban and Rural Counties, New Mexico, 2014-2016

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Heart disease mortality rates were highest and similar in Mixed Urban/Rural and Rural counties, and lowest in Metro and Small Metro counties. The heart disease mortality rate for Small Metro counties was statistically significantly lower than all other Urban/Rural categories.
Urban Versus Rural CountiesDeaths per 100,000 Population - Age AdjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 6
Metropolitan Counties138.8134.7143.04,3282,734,953
Small Metro Counties119.2114.0124.32,0761,467,729
Mixed Urban-Rural169.5163.8175.13,5141,814,577
Rural Counties155.9144.2167.6745284,564
New Mexico143.8141.1146.610,6936,301,823
U.S.168.52015 rate633,842

Data Notes

Heart disease mortality is defined as circulatory, Heart disease (ICD10: I00-I09, I11, I13, I20-I51). Some rows in data tables may include a note of Unstable or Very Unstable. Those rates labeled Unstable were statistically unstable (RSE >0.30 and <0.50), and may fluctuate widely across time periods due to random variation (chance). Those rates labeled Very Unstable were extremely unstable (RSE >0.50). These values should not be used to infer population risk.   Data have been directly age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. Data for the United States were obtained from the CDC/National Center for Health Statistics mortality data reports, available online at www.cdc.gov/nchs/deaths.htm.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • U.S. Data Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/.


Average Annual Heart Disease Deaths per 100,000 Population by Urban and Rural Counties, New Mexico, 2008-2011

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Small AreaDeaths per 100,000 Population - Age AdjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 110
1-Bernalillo County, Central Penn239.0206.2271.8206109,290
2-Bernalillo County, Central Tabo168.8144.9192.6191120,797
3-Bernalillo County, East Gateway112.992.6133.212076,410
4-Bernalillo County, Lomas San Mateo139.5118.9160.120181,735
5-Bernalillo County, Lomas Girard136.2106.1166.48559,630
6-Bernalillo County, Gibson University157.2116.0198.55851,269
7-Bernalillo County, Rio Bravo Second119.578.6160.43438,201
8-Bernalillo County, Lomas Broadway252.6218.2287.020781,615
9-Military Bases139.30.0323.4Very Unstable244,240
10-Bernalillo County, Isleta Gun Club170.3131.8208.88154,479
11-Bernalillo County, Arenal Unser166.597.7235.33163,948
12-Bernalillo County, Chavez OneEighteenth217.0158.4275.67093,722
13-Bernalillo County, Southwest97.153.8140.42246,534
14-Bernalillo County, Arenal Tapia167.0138.4195.712978,004
15-Bernalillo County, Central Coors163.2135.6190.913389,440
16-Bernalillo County, So. Ninetyeight147.9109.7186.169109,835
17-Bernalillo County, No. Ninetyeight135.9105.4166.38098,959
18-Bernalillo County, Montano Rio Grande101.176.9125.36949,306
19-Bernalillo County, Candelaria Second154.7126.7182.611768,874
20-Bernalillo County, Comanche Carlysle174.3142.6206.011569,621
21-Bernalillo County, Indian School Pennsylvania162.5143.3181.7301103,665
22-Bernalillo County, Indian School Juan Tabo147.5123.5171.514479,520
23-Bernalillo County, Montgomery Louisiana129.5109.4149.616286,402
24-Bernalillo County, Montgomery Moon139.8112.0167.69751,604
25-Bernalillo County, Comanche Juan Tabo158.7133.4183.915072,247
26-Bernalillo County, Paseo Louisiana125.1104.5145.714179,828
27-Bernalillo County, Paseo Ventura126.2107.6144.8177111,051
28-Bernalillo County, East Mountain114.387.3141.48276,200
29-Bernalillo County, Del Norte141.2107.5174.96976,746
30-Bernalillo County, Montano Coors91.763.6119.84451,605
31-Bernalillo County, Alameda Coors143.8110.1177.57489,362
32-Bernalillo County, Alameda Edith169.9143.8196.016279,757
33-Bernalillo County, Academy Tramway131.9115.9147.8283110,302
34-Bernalillo County, Irving Unser134.1106.6161.694106,249
35-Chaves County, Roswell N.W.165.6146.6184.6304127,366
36-Chaves County, Roswell S.E.208.4173.7243.213664,796
37-Chaves County, Other144.7112.8176.78269,769
38-Cibola County158.5134.0182.9164108,677
39-Colfax/Union Counties165.8140.6191.017373,196
40-Curry County, Clovis West217.8179.7255.812362,757
41-Curry County, Clovis East196.0167.1224.917482,868
42-Dona Ana County, Anthony Berino Chaparral135.4106.4164.29190,631
43-Dona Ana County, Central Las Cruces158.7131.8185.513573,117
44-Dona Ana County, Dona Ana Fort Selden122.898.9146.810491,608
45-Dona Ana County, Hatch and Surrounding Area101.173.2129.05146,514
46-Dona Ana County, Las Alturas Talavera104.683.4125.89451,331
47-Dona Ana County, Mesilla Picacho Mesilla Park122.691.3153.86048,082
48-Dona Ana County, Northwest Las Cruces165.2140.0190.5165100,045
49-Dona Ana County, Sonoma Butterfield Moongate134.7112.2157.3140107,616
50-Dona Ana County, South Valley116.787.1146.36159,139
51-Dona Ana County, Sunland Park95.868.5123.14973,893
52-Dona Ana County, South Las Cruces138.3108.2168.48283,075
53-Eddy County, Carlsbad189.2167.7210.6300114,009
54-Eddy County, Other198.3170.3226.3189101,299
55-Grant County, Silver City141.7118.3165.114567,824
56-Hidalgo County/Grant County, Other155.0131.6178.416870,383
57-Lea County, Hobbs No.171.4142.0200.912880,102
58-Lea County, Hobbs So.215.5168.5262.68253,822
59-Lea County, Other172.8148.4197.1191123,609
60-Lincoln County131.5110.1152.815681,847
61-Los Alamos County83.064.2101.77672,231
62-Luna County241.0214.8267.2331100,491
63-McKinley County, Gallup141.5115.7167.311696,759
64-McKinley County, NW109.379.1139.45264,785
65-McKinley County, SW71.647.995.33777,421
66-McKinley County, Other153.3112.6194.05750,197
67-San Miguel County, Las Vegas196.2164.4228.214464,638
68-San Miguel County, Pecos/Villanueva98.362.3134.43135,492
69-Mora/Guadalupe/San Miguel East139.8111.6167.99755,973
70-Otero County, Alamogordo N.E.223.3194.7251.923372,153
71-Otero County, Alamogordo S.W.189.2156.4222.112962,452
72-Otero County, Other173.7147.0200.4175108,746
73-Quay/DeBaca/Harding Counties153.8125.8181.711847,362
74-Rio Arriba, Espanola and Pueblos149.7127.7171.6178113,290
75-Rio Arriba, North131.398.0164.76148,045
76-Roosevelt County/Curry County, Other201.9175.2228.6216117,747
77-San Juan County, Farmington North106.882.5131.27466,315
78-San Juan County, Farmington Southeast168.7133.9203.59060,749
79-San Juan County, Farmington West/Kirtland/La Plata171.5143.0199.914293,947
80-San Juan County, North/Aztec150.9125.8176.0140100,590
81-San Juan County, Northeast/Bloomfield155.0121.8188.38563,021
82-San Juan County, South104.975.2134.55062,952
83-San Juan County, West124.291.5156.95866,450
84-Sandoval County, Rio Rancho Blvd, No.141.2112.6169.8102111,282
85-Sandoval County, Rio Rancho Blvd, So.148.4125.7171.119257,045
86-Sandoval County, Rio Rancho West157.7115.5200.06695,140
87-Sandoval County, Rio Rancho So.171.2140.3202.112088,727
88-Sandoval County, Bernalillo/Placitas129.5100.6158.58357,612
89-Sandoval County, Corrales104.869.9139.63833,210
90-Sandoval County Other East137.690.8184.53436,063
91-Sandoval County Other West172.1130.1214.16839,003
92-Santa Fe County, East Foothills + Eldorado86.667.6105.68891,599
93-Santa Fe County, Opera Vicinity93.170.4115.96756,163
94-Santa Fe County, Pueblos Plus97.675.5119.77976,980
95-Santa Fe Co., Agua Fria Neighborhood + Downtown128.4110.8146.122094,577
96-Santa Fe County, Agua Fria Village98.062.6133.53353,673
97-Santa Fe, Bellamah/Stamm131.1107.2155.011571,546
98-Santa Fe County, Airport Road107.359.0155.52669,287
99-Santa Fe County, South137.199.7174.56160,452
101-Sierra/Catron Counties184.7161.4208.024763,187
102-Socorro County168.5138.9198.012771,613
103-Torrance County171.7139.6203.811565,677
104-Taos County, Northwest126.091.7160.45537,229
105-Taos County, Downtown and High Road94.977.5112.211693,968
106-Valencia County, Los Lunas161.1126.2196.08463,567
107-Valencia County, NE145.9115.8176.09264,450
108-Valencia County, SE160.6132.7188.513091,338
109-Valencia County, West and Belen205.7175.3236.117885,092
New Mexico150.4147.8153.012,7878,198,108
United States169.8U.S. value is from 2013.

Data Notes

Heart disease mortality is defined as circulatory, Heart disease (ICD10: I00-I09, I11, I13, I20-I51). Some rows in data tables may include a note of Unstable or Very Unstable. Those rates labeled Unstable were statistically unstable (RSE >0.30 and <0.50), and may fluctuate widely across time periods due to random variation (chance). Those rates labeled Very Unstable were extremely unstable (RSE >0.50). These values should not be used to infer population risk.   Data have been directly age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. Some rows in data tables may include a note of Unstable or Very Unstable. Those rates labeled Unstable were statistically unstable (RSE >0.30 and <0.50), and may fluctuate widely across time periods due to random variation (chance). Those rates labeled Very Unstable were extremely unstable (RSE >0.50). These values should not be used to infer population risk. Some Very Unstable rates have been suppressed.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • U.S. Data Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/.

References and Community Resources

1. Achievements in Public Health, 1900-1999: Decline in Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke -- United States, 1900-1999. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly, August6, 1999 / 48(30);649-656. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm4830a1.htm 2. Chronic Disease Prevention Council (http://www.chronicdiseasenm.org) 3. American Heart Association (www.heart.org) 4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention (http://www.cdc.gov/dhdsp)

More Resources and Links

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

For an on-line medical dictionary, click on this Dictionary link.

Page Content Updated On 09/10/2017, Published on 09/12/2017
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Sun, 24 September 2017 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 16:31:41 MDT