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Complete Health Indicator Report of Diabetes Hospitalizations

Definition

The number of hospital inpatient discharges for diabetes per 10,000 population, ICD9-CM code 250 and, after October 1, 2015, ICD10-CM codes E10-E14.

Numerator

Number of diabetes-related hospital discharges within a given year. Discharges are grouped as Primary and Any diagnosis. Primary discharges include only the discharges in which diabetes was the first diagnosis listed (coded) for the hospitalizations. "Any" discharges are all discharges in which diabetes was one of the nine possible diagnoses listed for the hospitalizations. Numerator data are from the NM Hospital Inpatient Discharge Database of the NM Department of Health.

Denominator

Number of NM residents in a given year who belong within the specified geographic or age group.

Data Interpretation Issues

The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) is a coding system that provides the rules for coding and classifying diseases and conditions. The ICD is developed collaboratively between the World Health Organization (WHO) and 10 international centers, such as the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. These data are about discharges of New Mexico residents from non-federal NM hospitals only. A discharge occurs when a patient is admitted to a hospital and stays overnight or when a hospital patient dies on the day of admission to the hospital. NM non-federal hospitals submit these data to the New Mexico Department of Health, which maintains these data in the Hospital Inpatient Discharge Database (HIDD). Data have been directly age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. These data do not include hospital discharges from federal hospitals, that is, Department of Veterans Affairs and Indian Health Service hospitals. Thus, the data presented in this report under-estimate hospitalization rates, especially for the New Mexico American Indian population and military veterans. Until federal hospitals can be included in the data, these results should not be used to make population inferences for New Mexico's American Indian populations. These data also do not include information about New Mexico residents who were hospitalized outside New Mexico or about out-of-state residents who were hospitalized in New Mexico. The accuracy of the original data is the responsibility of the submitting hospital, and the New Mexico Department of Health assumes no responsibility for any use made of or conclusions drawn from these data.

Why Is This Important?

Hospitalization is costly for individuals, families and society. Based on 2012 American Diabetes Association estimates, direct medical as well as nonmedical costs for diagnosed diabetes and undiagnosed diabetes were about $1.8 billion in New Mexico alone. This 2012 estimate includes the costs of hospitalization, office visits, prescription medications, inability to work due to disability, reduced productivity at work, and lost productivity capacity due to early mortality. This does not include costs due to prediabetes, over the counter medications, prevention programs, research programs, and productivity loss for informal caregivers. Diabetes hospitalizations are considered potentially preventable hospitalizations, that is, some proportion of these inpatient stays are preventable. According to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), "with high-quality, community-based primary care, hospitalization for these illnesses often can be avoided". AHRQ includes diabetes as one such illness. Key prevention strategies include regular physical activity and healthy nutrition; effective self-management; regular and effective management support; and, access to specialty or ambulatory care as appropriate. Environmental prevention strategies include accessible and affordable vegetables and fruits; readily accessible safe places for physical activity; and school, work and community cultures visibly supporting physical activity for all ages and abilities. To accomplish this there is a role for all sectors, from families to businesses to health systems to government. One public health role is to build supports, structures and conditions that make it easy for as many people as possible to be active, to eat a healthy diet daily, and to access primary care when needed. A vital part of this role is linking clinical systems with community supports, such as the National Diabetes Prevention Program, diabetes self-management education, and other community-based prevention programs.

Other Objectives

There are 16 Healthy People 2020 (HP 2020) diabetes objectives. The only HP 2020 objective directly related to hospitalization is Objective D-4: Reduce the rate of lower extremity amputations in persons with diagnosed diabetes. Other HP 2020 diabetes objectives include: D-5: Improve glycemic control among the population with diagnosed diabetes; D-7: Increase the proportion of the population with diagnosed diabetes whose blood pressure is under control; and Objective D-13: Increase the proportion of adults with diabetes who perform self-blood glucose monitoring at least once daily. While these three do not refer directly to hospitalization, good glycemic and blood pressure control (which are also part of self-management) and daily glucose monitoring can impact hospitalization rates. New Mexico Community Health Status Indicator (CHSI)

How Are We Doing?

The first chart shows diabetes discharge rates for the diabetes as the first-listed (primary) diagnosis and for diabetes as any-listed diagnosis, for NM and the US, and give a general view of diabetes hospitalization. The New Mexico Diabetes Hospitalization rate for Diabetes as the primary diagnosis has been relatively stable for years. However, the rate for the most recent year available, 2017, was statistically significantly higher than the preceding three years. As any diagnosis, the diabetes hospitalization rate from 2010 through 2015 had been statistically significantly higher than rates of previous years. However, rates for the two most recent years, 2016 and 2017, were statistically significantly lower than preceding years, approaching the rates seen prior to 2010. RATES by AGE: As primary diagnosis, the hospitalization rates of the youngest age group has remained stable. That of the age group 15 to 44 years of age has been stable during the current decade but these rates are statistically significantly higher than those of the previous decade. The hospitalization rate for the age group 45 to 64 years of age has remained stable. For the most part, the rate of the age group 65 or older has remained stable. However, the 2017 rate for this age group was statistically significantly higher than the preceding three years, 2014-2016. As any diagnosis, the hospitalization rate of the youngest age group, 0-14, has remained stable. The rate of the age group 15 to 44 years of age has been stable during the current decade but these rates were statistically significantly higher than those of the previous decade. The rates of the two older age groups, 45-64 and 65 or older, were statistically significantly higher during the years 2011-2014 over previous years but have been statistically significantly lower the past three years, 2015-2017. RATES by REGION: Graphs of diabetes hospitalizations show rates for primary diagnosis and for any-listed diagnosis by the five NM Health Regions. Each region has its own unique mix of factors which influence hospital and provider practice and make it tricky to compare across regions. Secondly, the lack of Indian Health Service (which affects the Northwest, Metro, and Northeast Regions) and Veterans Affairs (which affects Metro Region) records each year means some regional rates may be higher than what is shown. Only comparisons of rates across time within a region will be made. As the primary diagnosis, in 2017, the hospitalization rate for the Northwest region was statistically significantly higher than the rates for all other regions. The rate for the Northeast region was statistically significantly higher than the remaining three regions, Metro, Southeast, and Southwest. The Northwest and Northeast regions were both statistically significantly higher than the rate of the state, over all. As any diagnosis, in 2017, the hospitalization rate of the Northeast region was statistically significantly lower than that of all other regions. That of the Metro region was statistically significantly lower than the rates for the other three regions. The rate of the Northwest region was statistically significantly higher than the rates of all other regions.

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

Making area-to-area comparisons of hospital rates is not straightforward. Many factors drive the variation in hospitalization rates across states and within a state. There are area-to-area differences in medical practice, in reasons or algorithms for admitting or not admitting into a hospital, and in the resources and effectiveness of local medical and social systems in diabetes treatment and management. Lastly, US rates are from the National Hospital Discharge Survey and are based on a sample of short-stay, nonfederal hospitals in the US and are based on diabetes as any of seven diagnoses examined (rather than the nine diagnoses used in NM rates). One should keep these caveats in mind in when reading the comparisons below. US rates were higher than NM rates for primary and for any-listed diabetes hospitalizations. From 2000 to 2009 (the last year of data for the US), US any-listed rates fluctuated between 157 and 176 diabetes-related hospitalizations per 10,000 persons, compared to NM rates that were between 111 and 119. For primary diagnosis rates, the 2009 US rate was 60% higher than the corresponding NM rate. For any-listed rates, the 2009 US rate was 30% higher than the 2009 NM rate. At this time, there are no 2010 or later US rates available. The national survey of hospital discharges has been redesigned; the survey had been conducted annually from 1965-2010. Equivalent US rates subsequent years have not been published.

What Is Being Done?

The NM Department of Health Diabetes Prevention and Control Program (DPCP) works with health care providers and community partners, agencies and coalitions to provide multiple diabetes prevention and management services and programs. Services and programs include: professional development trainings and resources for diabetes prevention and management; the National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP), a proven community-based physical activity and nutrition intervention to prevent or delay diabetes in persons at high risk; community resources to help people manage their diabetes through skill building, such as the Chronic Disease Self-Management and Diabetes Self-Management Education Programs; Kitchen Creations cooking schools; and health system disease management interventions that improve blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol. The DPCP provides education, information, and resources about prediabetes and diabetes, particularly to health care providers, to increase screening, testing and referral to prevention and management programs. This includes a centralized referral and data system that helps providers easily make referrals to the above programs. DPCP?s partners support built environment improvements so people at risk for or with diabetes can be physically active and initiatives that increase access to healthy foods. Both are essential components of effective population-based diabetes prevention and control. The DPCP consults with populations that are disproportionately affected by diabetes and/or those that serve them to develop programs and services that are culturally appropriate for these populations.

Evidence-based Practices

Diabetes and its complications can be prevented, delayed and/or managed through participation in evidence-based programs, including the National Diabetes Prevention Program or NDPP (provided in a clinical, community, or web-based setting), the Diabetes Self-Management Education Program or DSMEP (provided in a community or web-based setting), and Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support programs or DSME/S (usually provided in a clinical setting). Improving the quality of clinical care for people with and at risk for diabetes is also an evidence-based practice. The following DPCP activities are in alignment with these accepted programs and practices: 1. Increase use of the NDPP to prevent or delay onset of type 2 diabetes among people at high risk by raising awareness about prediabetes and the NDPP, increasing delivery sites, facilitating the screening and referral process, and working to obtain health insurance coverage (including Medicaid) for the program. 2. Increase access to sustainable self-management education and support services (DSMEP and DSME/S) to improve control of A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol, and to promote tobacco cessation, by increasing delivery sites, facilitating the referral process, and working to obtain health insurance coverage (including Medicaid) for the programs. 3. Implement evidence-based worksite programs and policies that help people prevent or manage diabetes and related chronic conditions, promote tobacco cessation, and help employees improve control of their A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol. 4. Improve health outcomes for people with and at risk for diabetes by supporting health care organizations to improve quality of care through use of the Planned Care Model, Patient Centered Medical Home, and Electronic Health Record. Within these organizations, support policy and protocol implementation that institutionalize and help sustain quality care improvements. 5. Promote the sustainability of Community Health Workers (CHWs) involved in providing diabetes prevention and management services.

Available Services

-Professional development opportunities provided by the New Mexico Diabetes Advisory Council, with continuing education credits, focusing on prediabetes and diabetes, and other related chronic health conditions such as obesity, smoking, and cardiovascular disease. -Technical assistance to clinics and primary care providers to support system changes that improve health outcomes (e.g. AIC, blood pressure, LDL cholesterol and smoking cessation) -Support for community-based prevention and management initiatives such as the National Diabetes Prevention Program, Diabetes and Chronic Disease Self-Management Programs, and Kitchen Creations cooking schools for people with diabetes. -Technical assistance with data, surveillance, and epidemiology For more information on programs or services provided by the NM Department of Health, Diabetes Prevention and Control Program, call (505) 841-5859.


Related Indicators

Relevant Population Characteristics

Age is a major risk factor for chronic disease. NM's population, like the nation's population, is aging. In 1990, NM's population of 65 years and older was 10.7% of the state population; in 2013, this age group constituted 14% of the state population, and by 2017, the most recent population estimates available, this age group constituted 16.8% of the population. This proportion of older adults is projected to increase for NM and for the US. In addition, NM's total population is growing, just like the rest of the country. In 2010, about 171,000 New Mexico residents were over 65; in 2013, this group numbered slightly under 294,000; and in 2017, over 355,000 New Mexico residents were over age 65. The rate of diabetes is highest in the 65 and older age group. Based on these demographic shifts, chronic diseases, such as diabetes, will continue to be a significant and increasing concern for the state and nation. Those who are poor or live in poor areas are most vulnerable to social isolation. Conditions of poverty or social isolation expose people to inadequate quantity and quality of services and to unhealthy places to live or work. Many factors drive the use of health care, including the presence of nearby services that are affordable and a family's ability to pay for services to stay healthy without undue stress on meeting other essential needs. NM has had decades of higher levels of poverty than the US. Taken together, these factors--an aging population, high levels of poverty, and lack of access to necessary resources for staying healthy--have substantial bearing on which groups and areas of our state have the highest or lowest rates of potentially preventable diabetes hospitalizations.

Related Relevant Population Characteristics Indicators:


Health Care System Factors

Effective treatment, nutritional counseling, diabetes self-management education and medical supplies for self-management that are affordable and accessible, near where people live or work, are crucial to preventing hospitalization. These may be delivered in clinical and/or community settings. Lack of or inadequate health insurance coverage or the fact that some support services are not reimbursable, are major barriers to many of these services. Active support from medical providers, families, and communities around healthy eating and adequate physical activity helps individuals with diabetes to stay healthier longer.

Related Health Care System Factors Indicators:


Risk Factors

Many inter-related risk factors contribute to diabetes-related hospitalizations, ranging from individual behaviors to socio-economic and environmental conditions that influence individual behavior. Individual behaviors include inadequate physical activity, poor nutrition/unhealthy eating, and not maintaining a healthy weight. Critical social and environmental factors include poverty, lack of safe public places for physical activity, community norms that do not encourage regular or daily physical activity, schools and work sites that do not actively support healthy behaviors, and healthy food and effective treatments that are not routinely accessible.

Related Risk Factors Indicators:


Related Health Status Outcomes Indicators:




Graphical Data Views

Hospitalizations with Diabetes as Primary and Any Diagnosis, New Mexico 2000-2017 and U.S. 2000-2009

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

The New Mexico Diabetes Hospitalization rate for Diabetes as the primary diagnosis has been relatively stable for years. However, the rate for the most recent year available, 2017, was statistically significantly higher than the preceding three years. As any diagnosis, the diabetes hospitalization rate from 2010 through 2015 had been statistically significantly higher than rates of previous years. However, rates for the two most recent years, 2016 and 2017, were statistically significantly lower than preceding years, approaching the rates seen prior to 2010.
Diagnosis: Primary vs Any Diagnosis, NM & USYearHospitalizations per 10,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 56
Primary Diagnosis, NM200012.111.612.62,1601,828,560
Primary Diagnosis, NM200113.112.613.62,3741,851,512
Primary Diagnosis, NM200211.611.112.12,1541,874,575
Primary Diagnosis, NM200311.511122,1681,897,640
Primary Diagnosis, NM200412.211.712.72,3541,920,743
Primary Diagnosis, NM200512.512132,4431,943,810
Primary Diagnosis, NM200612.211.812.72,4441,966,863
Primary Diagnosis, NM200712.311.812.82,4721,989,979
Primary Diagnosis, NM20081312.613.62,6652,013,046
Primary Diagnosis, NM200913.513142,7962,036,112
Primary Diagnosis, NM201013.813.314.3-2,8972,065,194
Primary Diagnosis, NM201113.813.214.3-2,9192,081,550
Primary Diagnosis, NM201214.413.915-3,0732,092,246
Primary Diagnosis, NM201315.414.916-3,3202,096,134
Primary Diagnosis, NM201413.813.314.3-2,9602,099,510
Primary Diagnosis, NM201513.112.613.6-2,8392,102,646
Primary Diagnosis, NM20161312.513.5-2,8272,103,586
Primary Diagnosis, NM201715.214.615.73,3312,102,521
Any Diagnosis, NM2000110.7109.2112.219,3961,828,560
Any Diagnosis, NM2001114.6113116.120,6071,851,512
Any Diagnosis, NM2002111.3109.8112.820,5511,874,575
Any Diagnosis, NM2003114.4112.9115.921,6201,897,640
Any Diagnosis, NM2004116.511511822,5761,920,743
Any Diagnosis, NM2005118.6117.1120.123,4761,943,810
Any Diagnosis, NM2006116.511511823,6051,966,863
Any Diagnosis, NM2007115.7114.2117.223,9441,989,979
Any Diagnosis, NM2008127.4125.9128.926,7622,013,046
Any Diagnosis, NM2009132.9131.4134.528,5902,036,112
Any Diagnosis, NM2010155.1153.5156.7-34,1202,065,194
Any Diagnosis, NM2011156.7155.1158.3-35,1622,081,550
Any Diagnosis, NM2012154.6153156.2-35,3402,092,246
Any Diagnosis, NM2013159.5157.9161.1-37,0882,096,134
Any Diagnosis, NM2014153151.4154.6-36,0352,099,510
Any Diagnosis, NM2015145.3143.7146.8-34,7422,102,646
Any Diagnosis, NM2016122.4121123.9-29,2612,103,586
Any Diagnosis, NM2017122.5121123.929,6272,102,521
Primary Diagnosis, U.S.200019.94,395,000
Primary Diagnosis, U.S.200119.74,602,000
Primary Diagnosis, U.S.2002204,851,000
Primary Diagnosis, U.S.200320.45,148,000
Primary Diagnosis, U.S.200420.15,209,000
Primary Diagnosis, U.S.200519.45,230,000
Primary Diagnosis, U.S.200619.15,267,000
Primary Diagnosis, U.S.200720.25,182,000
Primary Diagnosis, U.S.200819.85,355,000
Primary Diagnosis, U.S.200921.55,518,000
Any Diagnosis, U.S.2000157.44,395,000
Any Diagnosis, U.S.2001162.34,602,000
Any Diagnosis, U.S.2002168.24,851,000
Any Diagnosis, U.S.2003175.75,148,000
Any Diagnosis, U.S.2004175.35,209,000
Any Diagnosis, U.S.2005173.25,230,000
Any Diagnosis, U.S.2006171.45,267,000
Any Diagnosis, U.S.2007165.55,182,000
Any Diagnosis, U.S.2008168.15,355,000
Any Diagnosis, U.S.2009170.25,518,000

Data Notes

Diseases listed on hospital discharge records are assigned specific ICD codes. Under the ICD, the primary condition/ disease leading to the hospitalization is listed first. There may also be up to eight additional conditions which contributed to the hospitalization, for a total of nine possible conditions. These data are based on the ICD codes listed on the hospital discharge records, and thus are about the number of discharges, not the number of persons hospitalized, over the course of the year. This means a person admitted to a hospital multiple times over the year will be counted each time as a separate discharge from the hospital. Except for age-specific rates, rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 US Standard Populations.   US rates for 2010 and later are currently not available, due to a redesign of the national hospital discharge sample.

Data Sources

  • Hospital Inpatient Discharge Data, New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • U.S. Health and Human Services, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (ARHQ), Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP), National Inpatient Sample


Hospitalizations with Diabetes as Primary Diagnosis, by Age Group and Year, 2000 to 2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

The hospitalization rates of the youngest age group has remained stable. That of the age group 15 to 44 years of age has been stable during the current decade but these rates are statistically significantly higher than those of the previous decade. The hospitalization rate for the age group 45 to 64 years of age has remained stable. For the most part, the rate of the age group 65 or older has remained stable. However, the 2017 rate for this age group was statistically significantly higher than the preceding three years, 2014-2016.
Age: Four Age Groups, 0-14, 15-44, 45-64, 65+YearHospitalizations per 10,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 112
1. 0-14 Years20103.12.53.6132430,325
1. 0-14 Years201132.43.5128431,241
1. 0-14 Years20122.92.43.4123429,496
1. 0-14 Years20132.21.82.795426,141
1. 0-14 Years20142.21.82.693421,754
1. 0-14 Years20152.72.23.2114417,268
1. 0-14 Years20162.522.9101411,919
1. 0-14 Years20172.92.43.5120402,339
2. 15-44 Years20007.678.2595785,302
2. 15-44 Years20018.27.68.8646787,547
2. 15-44 Years200287.48.6634789,817
2. 15-44 Years20038.789.3688792,086
2. 15-44 Years20048.98.29.5704794,368
2. 15-44 Years200510.19.410.8803796,638
2. 15-44 Years20069.58.810.2758798,908
2. 15-44 Years200710.19.410.8810801,190
2. 15-44 Years200810.71011.4858803,459
2. 15-44 Years200911.811.112.6952805,729
2. 15-44 Years201012.111.412.9984810,544
2. 15-44 Years20111312.213.81,063817,142
2. 15-44 Years201213.913.114.71,138819,805
2. 15-44 Years201315.114.3161,240820,638
2. 15-44 Years201413.312.514.11,093819,886
2. 15-44 Years201512.912.113.71,056818,947
2. 15-44 Years201612.71213.51,041817,930
2. 15-44 Years201714.213.4151,156816,228
3. 45-64 Years200018.517.219.8749405,411
3. 45-64 Years200119.818.521.2832419,757
3. 45-64 Years200217.115.918.3742434,110
3. 45-64 Years200316.415.217.6737448,462
3. 45-64 Years200418.31719.5846462,823
3. 45-64 Years200517.716.518.9843477,175
3. 45-64 Years200619.518.220.7957491,527
3. 45-64 Years200717.316.118.4874505,888
3. 45-64 Years200818.617.419.8969520,241
3. 45-64 Years20091816.919.2965534,595
3. 45-64 Years201018.817.7201,035550,230
3. 45-64 Years201118.617.419.71,026552,833
3. 45-64 Years201220.118.921.31,099546,739
3. 45-64 Years20132321.824.31,247541,392
3. 45-64 Years201420.519.321.71,099536,828
3. 45-64 Years201519.21820.41,027534,353
3. 45-64 Years201618.817.620996530,186
3. 45-64 Years201722.421.123.61,171523,887
4. 65+ Years200032.830.435.2710216,549
4. 65+ Years200134.732.237.1770222,035
4. 65+ Years200228.926.731.1657227,609
4. 65+ Years200327.825.730649233,186
4. 65+ Years200428.626.430.7682238,775
4. 65+ Years20052825.930683244,353
4. 65+ Years2006242225.9599249,931
4. 65+ Years200725.423.427.3648255,529
4. 65+ Years200827.325.329.3713261,108
4. 65+ Years200926.924.928.8717266,681
4. 65+ Years201027.225.329.2746274,161
4. 65+ Years201124.82326.7702282,568
4. 65+ Years201224.122.325.8713296,138
4. 65+ Years20132422.225.7738308,023
4. 65+ Years201421.119.522.7677320,748
4. 65+ Years201519.317.820.8642332,077
4. 65+ Years201620.118.621.6689343,551
4. 65+ Years201724.923.326.5884355,067

Data Notes

Diseases listed on hospital discharge records are assigned specific ICD codes. Under the ICD, the primary condition/ disease leading to the hospitalization is listed first. There may also be up to eight additional conditions which contributed to the hospitalization, for a total of nine possible conditions. These data are based on the ICD codes listed on the hospital discharge records, and thus are about the number of discharges, not the number of persons hospitalized, over the course of the year. This means a person admitted to a hospital multiple times over the year will be counted each time as a separate discharge from the hospital. Except for age-specific rates, rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 US Standard Populations.   Estimates are crude estimates, as age-adjustment is not necessary when stratifying by age.

Data Sources

  • Hospital Inpatient Discharge Data, New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.


Hospitalizations with Diabetes as Primary Diagnosis, by Age Group and Sex, 2015-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

The rate of hospitalization was higher among the two older age groups within each sex, and within all but the youngest age group the rate for males was higher than that of the respective age group for females.
Sex: Males vs. FemalesAge GroupHospitalizations per 10,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 12
Male0 to 142.72.33.1-168630,096
Male15 to 4414.61415.3-1,8371,255,163
Male45 to 6424.523.425.6-1,880767,721
Male65 and over25.824.427.3-1,216470,946
Female0 to 142.82.33.2-167606,430
Female15 to 4411.811.212.4-1,4161,197,943
Female45 to 641615.216.9-1,314820,706
Female65 and over17.816.719-999559,749
All0 to 142.72.43-3351,236,526
All15 to 4413.312.813.7-3,2532,453,105
All45 to 6420.119.420.8-3,1941,588,427
All65 and over21.520.622.4-2,2151,030,695

Data Notes

Diseases listed on hospital discharge records are assigned specific ICD codes. Under the ICD, the primary condition/ disease leading to the hospitalization is listed first. There may also be up to eight additional conditions which contributed to the hospitalization, for a total of nine possible conditions. These data are based on the ICD codes listed on the hospital discharge records, and thus are about the number of discharges, not the number of persons hospitalized, over the course of the year. This means a person admitted to a hospital multiple times over the year will be counted each time as a separate discharge from the hospital. Except for age-specific rates, rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 US Standard Populations.   Estimates are crude estimates as age adjustment isn't necessary when stratifying by age.

Data Sources

  • Hospital Inpatient Discharge Data, New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.


Hospitalizations with Diabetes as Any Diagnosis, by Age Group, 2000 to 2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

The hospitalization rate of the youngest age group, 0-14, has remained stable. The rate of the age group 15 to 44 years of age has been stable during the current decade but these rates were statistically significantly higher than those of the previous decade. The rates of the two older age groups, 45-64 and 65 or older, were statistically significantly higher during the years 2011-2014 over previous years but have been statistically significantly lower the past three years, 2015-2017.
Age: Four Age Groups, 0-14, 15-44, 45-64, 65+YearHospitalizations per 10,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 83
1. 0-14 Years20104.13.54.7-175430,325
1. 0-14 Years20113.93.34.5-167431,241
1. 0-14 Years20123.634.2-154429,496
1. 0-14 Years20132.92.43.4-122426,141
1. 0-14 Years201432.53.6-128421,754
1. 0-14 Years20153.534.1-148417,268
1. 0-14 Years20163.73.14.3-152411,919
1. 0-14 Years20173.73.14.3-150407,339
2. 15-44 Years200029.628.430.82,321785,302
2. 15-44 Years200132.130.933.42,531787,547
2. 15-44 Years200231.730.5332,505789,817
2. 15-44 Years200335.233.936.52,790792,086
2. 15-44 Years200436.835.538.22,927794,368
2. 15-44 Years200539.538.240.93,149796,638
2. 15-44 Years200638.837.440.13,096798,908
2. 15-44 Years200741.239.842.63,297801,195
2. 15-44 Years200845.343.846.83,641803,466
2. 15-44 Years200948.547503,910805,735
2. 15-44 Years201053.251.654.7-4,309810,546
2. 15-44 Years201153.65255.2-4,370815,432
2. 15-44 Years201253.752.155.3-4,400819,227
2. 15-44 Years201353.952.355.5-4,420820,174
2. 15-44 Years20145452.455.6-4,425820,043
2. 15-44 Years20155250.553.6-4,261818,947
2. 15-44 Years20165351.454.6-4,337817,930
2. 15-44 Years201752.851.254.4-4,309816,228
3. 45-64 Years2000163.3159.4167.26,619405,411
3. 45-64 Years2001167.7163.8171.67,040419,757
3. 45-64 Years2002167163.2170.97,252434,110
3. 45-64 Years2003171.9168.1175.77,708448,462
3. 45-64 Years2004179.3175.5183.28,300462,823
3. 45-64 Years2005180.2176.51848,601477,175
3. 45-64 Years2006179.7176183.48,833491,527
3. 45-64 Years2007177.6174181.38,983505,889
3. 45-64 Years2008183.6179.9187.29,551520,241
3. 45-64 Years2009222.9219226.9-11,918534,595
3. 45-64 Years2010220.9217224.8-12,150550,118
3. 45-64 Years2011230.3226.4234.3-12,732552,766
3. 45-64 Years2012231.6227.6235.6-12,688547,803
3. 45-64 Years2013240.1236244.2-13,024542,429
3. 45-64 Years2014237.4233.4241.5-12,775538,057
3. 45-64 Years2015229.3225.2233.3-12,251534,353
3. 45-64 Years2016201.9198.1205.6-10,702530,186
3. 45-64 Years2017203.8200207.6-10,677523,887
4. 65+ Years2000476.7467.7485.710,323216,549
4. 65+ Years2001489.8480.9498.810,876222,035
4. 65+ Years2002467.3458.747610,637227,609
4. 65+ Years2003471.4462.848010,993233,186
4. 65+ Years2004468.8460.3477.311,194238,775
4. 65+ Years2005473.7465.3482.211,576244,353
4. 65+ Years2006460451.8468.211,497249,931
4. 65+ Years2007449441457.111,472255,529
4. 65+ Years2008513.3504.8521.813,403261,108
4. 65+ Years2009524515.6532.513,975266,681
4. 65+ Years2010637.7628.6646.8-17,486274,205
4. 65+ Years2011634.3625.3643.2-17,893282,111
4. 65+ Years2012612603.4620.6-18,098295,719
4. 65+ Years2013635.1626.5643.7-19,522307,390
4. 65+ Years2014585.2577.1593.4-18,707319,657
4. 65+ Years2015544.5536.8552.2-18,082332,077
4. 65+ Years2016409.5402.9416.2-14,070343,551
4. 65+ Years2017408.1401.6414.6-14,491355,067

Data Notes

Diseases listed on hospital discharge records are assigned specific ICD codes. Under the ICD, the primary condition/ disease leading to the hospitalization is listed first. There may also be up to eight additional conditions which contributed to the hospitalization, for a total of nine possible conditions. These data are based on the ICD codes listed on the hospital discharge records, and thus are about the number of discharges, not the number of persons hospitalized, over the course of the year. This means a person admitted to a hospital multiple times over the year will be counted each time as a separate discharge from the hospital. Except for age-specific rates, rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 US Standard Populations.   Estimates are crude estimates, as age-adjustment is not necessary when stratifying by age.

Data Sources

  • Hospital Inpatient Discharge Data, New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.


Hospitalizations with Diabetes as Primary Diagnosis, by NM Health Regions, Age-adjusted 2008 to 2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

In 2017, the hospitalization rate for the Northwest region was statistically significantly higher than the rates for all other regions. The rate for the Northeast region was statistically significantly higher than the remaining three regions, Metro, Southeast, and Southwest. The Northwest and Northeast regions were both statistically significantly higher than the rate of the state, over all.
Year: Consecutive calendar years 1980-2020New Mexico Health RegionHospitalizations per 10,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 66
2009Northwest16.214.417.9345227,357
2009Northeast12.711.414.1380291,812
2009Metro12.111.412.91,074871,721
2009Southeast17.61619.2489282,160
2009Southwest13.512.314.7508363,062
2010Northwest15.313.617-332229,176
2010Northeast13.41214.7-418293,648
2010Metro12.511.813.3-1,133891,136
2010Southeast18.917.220.5-530284,374
2010Southwest12.611.413.7-484366,860
2010New Mexico13.813.314.3-2,8972,065,194
2011Northwest14.412.816-317231,529
2011Northeast12.711.414.1-401294,658
2011Metro12.912.113.6-1,187898,788
2011Southeast18.116.519.7-501286,518
2011Southwest13.21214.3-513370,058
2011New Mexico13.813.214.3-2,9192,081,550
2012Northwest15.814.117.5-352231,545
2012Northeast1210.713.3-369295,401
2012Metro13.412.714.2-1,250904,475
2012Southeast20.118.421.9-556288,658
2012Southwest14.513.215.7-546372,166
2012New Mexico14.413.915-3,0732,092,246
2013Northwest19.617.721.5-439231,694
2013Northeast13.612.315-438294,972
2013Metro1413.214.8-1,317905,371
2013Southeast2119.322.7-600291,804
2013Southwest14.212.915.4-526372,294
2013New Mexico15.414.916-3,3202,096,134
2014Northwest14.212.615.8-320231,803
2014Northeast10.79.511.9-333294,456
2014Metro1312.313.8-1,221907,218
2014Southeast17.515.919-497292,839
2014Southwest15.814.517.1-589373,195
2014New Mexico13.813.314.3-2,9602,099,510
2015Northwest16.414.718.1-364231,701
2015Northeast10.99.712.1-331294,178
2015Metro12.912.213.7-1,221909,447
2015Southeast14.713.216.1-422294,625
2015Southwest12.811.714-501372,695
2015New Mexico13.112.613.6-2,8392,102,646
2016Northwest15.313.616.9-349229,320
2016Northeast13.612.214.9-435295,201
2016Metro12.411.713.2-1,168913,150
2016Southeast12.811.514.2-371293,367
2016Southwest12.811.714-504372,548
2016New Mexico1312.513.5-2,8272,103,586
2017Northwest21.419.423.3-486228,057
2017Northeast17.716.119.3-568295,220
2017Metro14.313.515-1,353914,050
2017Southeast13.712.315-405293,454
2017Southwest13.412.214.6-519371,741
2017New Mexico15.214.615.7-3,3312,102,521

Data Notes

Diseases listed on hospital discharge records are assigned specific ICD codes. Under the ICD, the primary condition/ disease leading to the hospitalization is listed first. There may also be up to eight additional conditions which contributed to the hospitalization, for a total of nine possible conditions. These data are based on the ICD codes listed on the hospital discharge records, and thus are about the number of discharges, not the number of persons hospitalized, over the course of the year. This means a person admitted to a hospital multiple times over the year will be counted each time as a separate discharge from the hospital. Except for age-specific rates, rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 US Standard Populations.   NM Health Regions comprise three to ten counties.

Data Sources

  • Hospital Inpatient Discharge Data, New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • U.S. Health and Human Services, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (ARHQ), Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP), National Inpatient Sample


Hospitalizations with Diabetes as Any Diagnosis, by NM Health Regions, Age-adjusted 2008 to 2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

In 2017, the hospitalization rate of the Northeast region was statistically significantly lower than that of all other regions. That of the Metro region was statistically significantly lower than the rates for the other three regions. The rate of the Northwest region was statistically significantly higher than the rates of all other regions.
Year: Consecutive calendar years 1980-2020New Mexico Health RegionHospitalizations per 10,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 60
2009Northwest160.4155165.83,366227,364
2009Northeast121.4117.6125.24,143291,812
2009Metro116113.7118.210,380871,721
2009Southeast160.8156.3165.44,754282,165
2009Southwest149145.2152.85,947363,062
2010Northwest183.3177.6189-3,916229,176
2010Northeast136.8132.8140.7-4,818293,648
2010Metro142.3139.9144.7-13,071891,136
2010Southeast179.8175184.5-5,351284,374
2010Southwest170.3166.3174.3-6,964366,860
2010New Mexico155.1153.5156.7-34,1202,065,194
2011Northwest199.4193.6205.3-4,330231,529
2011Northeast140.7136.8144.7-5,038294,658
2011Metro144141.6146.4-13,606898,788
2011Southeast166.3161.7170.8-5,047286,518
2011Southwest172.9168.9176.9-7,141370,058
2011New Mexico156.7155.1158.3-35,1622,081,550
2012Northwest197.3191.5203-4,396231,545
2012Northeast140.9136.9144.8-5,197295,401
2012Metro142.7140.3145.1-13,789904,475
2012Southeast167.5162.9172.1-5,051288,658
2012Southwest165.9161.9169.8-6,907372,166
2012New Mexico154.6153156.2-35,3402,092,246
2013Northwest206.7200.9212.5-4,679231,694
2013Northeast136.1132.3140-5,143294,972
2013Metro149.3146.9151.7-14,730905,371
2013Southeast180.1175.3184.8-5,496291,804
2013Southwest166.6162.6170.5-7,040372,294
2013New Mexico159.5157.9161.1-37,0882,096,134
2014Northwest187.3181.8192.9-4,306231,803
2014Northeast126.9123.1130.6-4,810294,456
2014Metro147.1144.8149.5-14,752907,218
2014Southeast159.8155.3164.3-4,916292,839
2014Southwest170.8166.8174.8-7,251373,195
2014New Mexico153151.4154.6-36,0352,099,510
2015Northwest183.5178189-4,231231,701
2015Northeast126.5122.8130.2-4,914294,178
2015Metro138.2136140.5-14,187909,447
2015Southeast146.2141.9150.5-4,529294,625
2015Southwest160.5156.6164.4-6,881372,695
2015New Mexico145.3143.7146.8-34,7422,102,646
2016Northwest162.4157.2167.6-3,780229,320
2016Northeast104.8101.3108.2-4,039295,201
2016Metro108.1106.1110.2-11,118913,150
2016Southeast131.5127.4135.6-4,069293,367
2016Southwest146.6142.8150.3-6,255372,548
2016New Mexico122.4121123.9-29,2612,103,586
2017Northwest162.4157.2167.5-3,816228,057
2017Northeast102.499105.9-3,983295,220
2017Metro109.6107.6111.7-11,411914,050
2017Southeast130.3126.3134.4-4,116293,454
2017Southwest147.1143.3150.8-6,301371,741
2017New Mexico122.5121123.9-29,6272,102,521

Data Notes

Diseases listed on hospital discharge records are assigned specific ICD codes. Under the ICD, the primary condition/ disease leading to the hospitalization is listed first. There may also be up to eight additional conditions which contributed to the hospitalization, for a total of nine possible conditions. These data are based on the ICD codes listed on the hospital discharge records, and thus are about the number of discharges, not the number of persons hospitalized, over the course of the year. This means a person admitted to a hospital multiple times over the year will be counted each time as a separate discharge from the hospital. Except for age-specific rates, rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 US Standard Populations.   NM Health Regions comprise three to ten counties.

Data Sources

  • Hospital Inpatient Discharge Data, New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • U.S. Health and Human Services, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (ARHQ), Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP), National Inpatient Sample


Hospitalizations with Diabetes as Primary Diagnosis, by NM County, 2015-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

In the 3-year period 2015-2017, there were statistically significant differences in county rates. The hospitalization rates for the six counties with the highest rates were all above 20.0 per 100,000. The hospitalization rates for the six counties with the lowest stable rates were all below 11.0 per 100,000, most of them below 10.0 per 100,000.
CountyHospitalizations per 10,000 Population, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 34
Bernalillo13.112.613.6-2,7612,038,559
Catron6.11.810.3Unstable1410,821
Chaves191721-371197,816
Cibola22.919.626.2-19682,162
Colfax18.814.223.4-7638,039
Curry12.310.414.1-176151,004
De Baca9.30.518.2Unstable55,616
Dona Ana12.311.413.1-803649,518
Eddy14.712.916.6-260172,579
Grant15.712.818.5-13686,329
Guadalupe26.918.135.7-3813,406
Harding**Very Unstable2,071
Hidalgo7.93.812.1-1513,440
Lea10.69.112-206210,827
Lincoln12.79.615.8-8659,430
Los Alamos9.56.912.2-5554,939
Luna18.415.121.6-14374,006
McKinley11.39.812.8-229220,906
Mora13.88.319.4-2913,926
Otero10.89.312.2-220196,675
Quay13.28.617.7-3925,506
Rio Arriba22.920.225.7-291118,846
Roosevelt9.46.812-5558,666
Sandoval13.612.514.8-617422,825
San Juan20.118.721.6-774386,010
San Miguel21.217.924.5-18184,349
Santa Fe10.89.811.8-516446,484
Sierra19.614.225-7534,089
Socorro20.716.824.5-11852,106
Taos13.110.715.6-13599,587
Torrance8.65.911.2-4547,081
Union8.63.313.9Unstable1112,953
Valencia13.912.315.4-319228,182
New Mexico13.813.5148,9976,308,753

Data Notes

Diseases listed on hospital discharge records are assigned specific ICD codes. Under the ICD, the primary condition/ disease leading to the hospitalization is listed first. There may also be up to eight additional conditions which contributed to the hospitalization, for a total of nine possible conditions. These data are based on the ICD codes listed on the hospital discharge records, and thus are about the number of discharges, not the number of persons hospitalized, over the course of the year. This means a person admitted to a hospital multiple times over the year will be counted each time as a separate discharge from the hospital. Except for age-specific rates, rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 US Standard Populations.

Data Sources

  • Hospital Inpatient Discharge Data, New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.


Hospitalizations with Diabetes as Any Diagnosis, by NM County, 3-Year Rolling Age-adjusted Averages, 2007-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

The diabetes hospitalization rate varies widely by county. The statewide rate for the most recent 3-year period, 2015-2017, is statistically significantly lower than that of previous 3-year periods. Though the differences across 3-year periods is not always statistically significantly different, there does appear to be a trend to lower rates over recent years.
3-Year Groups from 1990CountyHospitalizations per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 272
2008-2010Bernalillo128.6127.1130.2-25,7081,959,310
2008-2010Catron50.438.362.4-10311,155
2008-2010Chaves195189.1201-4,074195,961
2008-2010Cibola231.2221.1241.3-1,95481,277
2008-2010Colfax167.6156.7178.4-95641,396
2008-2010Curry159.2152.6165.9-2,153144,243
2008-2010De Baca118.795.1142.3-1096,129
2008-2010Dona Ana156.9153.8160.1-9,427618,343
2008-2010Eddy229.4222.4236.4-4,068161,005
2008-2010Grant161.9154.2169.6-1,91089,005
2008-2010Guadalupe223.9201.7246.2-37514,067
2008-2010Harding110.861.2160.4-292,116
2008-2010Hidalgo155.5137.2173.8-27714,967
2008-2010Lea131.7126.4137-2,314191,834
2008-2010Lincoln88.581.795.3-76861,235
2008-2010Los Alamos59.453.465.4-39353,966
2008-2010Luna258.3247.9268.8-2,44675,319
2008-2010McKinley167.7161.8173.6-3,070215,597
2008-2010Mora185.9165.3206.5-33414,734
2008-2010Otero154.7149.5159.9-3,323191,092
2008-2010Quay145.2131.8158.5-50627,440
2008-2010Rio Arriba197.1189.6204.6-2,586121,079
2008-2010Roosevelt190.7179.3202.2-1,03359,033
2008-2010Sandoval132.7129.1136.3-5,220383,520
2008-2010San Juan168.7164.5172.9-6,040385,638
2008-2010San Miguel220.5211.2229.7-2,19888,433
2008-2010Santa Fe90.587.893.2-4,514428,391
2008-2010Sierra160147.9172-96336,328
2008-2010Socorro202.1190.5213.8-1,16053,729
2008-2010Taos145.9138.9152.9-1,75298,088
2008-2010Torrance111.3102.3120.3-61149,321
2008-2010Union102.787.5118-17613,555
2008-2010Valencia133.9129.2138.5-3,181227,076
2008-2010New Mexico145.2144.3146.1-93,7316,114,382
2009-2011Bernalillo140.3138.7141.9-28,7011,988,507
2009-2011Catron54.14167.2-11011,178
2009-2011Chaves200194206.1-4,216196,848
2009-2011Cibola278.8267.8289.7-2,38681,737
2009-2011Colfax163152.1173.9-92741,222
2009-2011Curry166.6159.8173.3-2,271145,491
2009-2011De Baca122.296.9147.5-1056,048
2009-2011Dona Ana168.2165171.4-10,409628,709
2009-2011Eddy232.9225.9239.9-4,168161,708
2009-2011Grant159151.2166.7-1,85888,499
2009-2011Guadalupe226.4204.2248.6-38414,036
2009-2011Harding64.533.695.4-232,091
2009-2011Hidalgo139.3121.8156.7-24914,684
2009-2011Lea136.8131.4142.2-2,428194,341
2009-2011Lincoln10496.6111.5-91161,494
2009-2011Los Alamos66.460.172.7-44454,111
2009-2011Luna267.1256.5277.6-2,55375,316
2009-2011McKinley181.6175.6187.6-3,409217,037
2009-2011Mora192.6171.3213.9-34614,615
2009-2011Otero168.6163.2174-3,661191,923
2009-2011Quay152.3138.5166.1-52527,140
2009-2011Rio Arriba209.7202217.5-2,781120,792
2009-2011Roosevelt183.5172.4194.6-1,02359,987
2009-2011Sandoval144140.3147.6-5,907394,379
2009-2011San Juan177.4173.1181.6-6,481389,294
2009-2011San Miguel226216.7235.4-2,28388,146
2009-2011Santa Fe100.297.4102.9-5,185432,786
2009-2011Sierra151.1139.3162.9-91836,017
2009-2011Socorro216.2204.2228.2-1,25553,653
2009-2011Taos145.6138.6152.6-1,77698,722
2009-2011Torrance125.5116135-70049,133
2009-2011Union114.398.2130.3-19813,596
2009-2011Valencia145.3140.5150.1-3,540229,625
2009-2011New Mexico154.8153.8155.7-102,1316,182,868
2010-2012Bernalillo141.9140.3143.5-29,7452,011,439
2010-2012Catron44.432.556.3-9011,192
2010-2012Chaves196.6190.6202.5-4,152197,640
2010-2012Cibola290.7279.5301.8-2,51482,027
2010-2012Colfax148.1137.7158.5-85440,930
2010-2012Curry181.5174.5188.6-2,476146,983
2010-2012De Baca136.9109.2164.7-1155,993
2010-2012Dona Ana171.1168174.3-10,845637,576
2010-2012Eddy218211.2224.8-3,921162,838
2010-2012Grant146.9139.4154.4-1,72788,191
2010-2012Guadalupe204.1182.9225.4-34714,007
2010-2012Harding59.435.983-272,079
2010-2012Hidalgo132.7115.1150.3-23114,492
2010-2012Lea137.6132.3143-2,460196,741
2010-2012Lincoln109.6102117.3-96561,659
2010-2012Los Alamos66.259.972.5-44454,322
2010-2012Luna256.4246266.8-2,45475,333
2010-2012McKinley188.9182.8195-3,605218,695
2010-2012Mora193.3172.1214.5-36014,521
2010-2012Otero162.6157.3167.9-3,538192,985
2010-2012Quay144.3130.8157.7-50126,830
2010-2012Rio Arriba213.2205.4220.9-2,882120,677
2010-2012Roosevelt151.9141.8162-85960,866
2010-2012Sandoval147.2143.5150.8-6,273402,760
2010-2012San Juan174.3170.1178.5-6,523391,528
2010-2012San Miguel233.3223.8242.7-2,38487,804
2010-2012Santa Fe106.7103.9109.6-5,714436,597
2010-2012Sierra142.7131.2154.2-86635,799
2010-2012Socorro213.8201.9225.7-1,26153,515
2010-2012Taos145.3138.4152.3-1,82299,157
2010-2012Torrance136.3126.4146.2-77348,866
2010-2012Union124.6108141.3-21913,613
2010-2012Valencia147.8143152.6-3,675231,334
2010-2012New Mexico155.4154.5156.4-104,6226,238,990
2011-2013Bernalillo143.1141.5144.7-30,6372,021,935
2011-2013Catron49.437.161.7-10011,178
2011-2013Chaves199.7193.7205.7-4,244198,026
2011-2013Cibola314.6303.1326.1-2,76782,132
2011-2013Colfax141.8131152.5-77240,530
2011-2013Curry185.3178.2192.4-2,536149,003
2011-2013De Baca159129.3188.7-1325,950
2011-2013Dona Ana167.9164.7171-10,814642,738
2011-2013Eddy225.2218.4232.1-4,081164,758
2011-2013Grant141.6134.4148.9-1,72588,009
2011-2013Guadalupe173.4153.8193.1-29713,921
2011-2013Harding59.537.981.1-302,078
2011-2013Hidalgo166.6146.4186.7-28614,264
2011-2013Lea133.2127.9138.4-2,413199,899
2011-2013Lincoln107.6100.1115.1-98161,570
2011-2013Los Alamos73.666.980.2-49254,263
2011-2013Luna277.9267.2288.7-2,69475,016
2011-2013McKinley200.8194.6207-3,914221,167
2011-2013Mora188.1167.7208.6-37214,488
2011-2013Otero151.5146.3156.6-3,321194,549
2011-2013Quay140.4126.9153.9-47926,559
2011-2013Rio Arriba216.2208.4223.9-2,977120,486
2011-2013Roosevelt127.6118.3136.9-72861,215
2011-2013Sandoval153.3149.6156.9-6,807407,039
2011-2013San Juan176.3172.1180.5-6,724391,469
2011-2013San Miguel240.3230.8249.8-2,51887,143
2011-2013Santa Fe107.3104.5110.1-5,922439,123
2011-2013Sierra138.5126.8150.1-82635,418
2011-2013Socorro223.1211235.3-1,32253,345
2011-2013Taos139.3132.5146.1-1,79199,456
2011-2013Torrance146.3136.1156.5-84048,307
2011-2013Union118.2101.8134.6-20713,543
2011-2013Valencia150.9146.1155.7-3,841231,353
2011-2013New Mexico156.9156157.9-107,5906,269,930
2012-2014Bernalillo144.5143146.1-31,5022,027,982
2012-2014Catron43.332.554.2-8811,106
2012-2014Chaves203.7197.7209.8-4,348198,321
2012-2014Cibola292281303-2,62482,214
2012-2014Colfax121.4111.3131.4-66939,970
2012-2014Curry179.1172.1186.1-2,449150,767
2012-2014De Baca173.4142.8204-1445,902
2012-2014Dona Ana167.2164.1170.3-10,913645,638
2012-2014Eddy215.3208.6221.9-3,935167,017
2012-2014Grant148140.7155.3-1,85087,943
2012-2014Guadalupe166.9148185.8-29413,798
2012-2014Harding57.33678.7-292,073
2012-2014Hidalgo176.6155.6197.7-30414,054
2012-2014Lea131.7126.5137-2,399203,293
2012-2014Lincoln116.4108.6124.3-1,05361,227
2012-2014Los Alamos70.764.177.3-47353,907
2012-2014Luna274.6263.8285.4-2,64074,578
2012-2014McKinley201.6195.5207.8-3,997221,809
2012-2014Mora167.3148.1186.4-34414,425
2012-2014Otero145140150.1-3,233196,350
2012-2014Quay140.8127154.6-47426,196
2012-2014Rio Arriba215.8208223.5-3,008120,093
2012-2014Roosevelt116107.1124.9-66160,578
2012-2014Sandoval154.4150.8158-7,060410,797
2012-2014San Juan173.6169.5177.8-6,760391,020
2012-2014San Miguel234.4225243.8-2,48886,278
2012-2014Santa Fe102.399.5105-5,786440,915
2012-2014Sierra151.3138.3164.4-83134,921
2012-2014Socorro222.8210.7234.9-1,33953,063
2012-2014Taos143.1136.2149.9-1,88699,913
2012-2014Torrance139.5129.7149.3-82847,712
2012-2014Union99.984.6115.2-17313,456
2012-2014Valencia149.1144.4153.8-3,881230,573
2012-2014New Mexico155.6154.7156.6-108,4636,287,890
2013-2015Bernalillo142.4140.8144-31,6122,031,712
2013-2015Catron49.338.759.9-11010,972
2013-2015Chaves206.5200.4212.6-4,434198,313
2013-2015Cibola275.6265286.3-2,50382,401
2013-2015Colfax116106.2125.7-64939,358
2013-2015Curry161.3154.6168-2,218151,701
2013-2015De Baca164.8134.7194.9-1345,812
2013-2015Dona Ana163.7160.6166.8-10,854647,153
2013-2015Eddy200.2193.8206.6-3,694169,521
2013-2015Grant152.2144.8159.6-1,89387,815
2013-2015Guadalupe189.8169.4210.1-33013,602
2013-2015Harding52.932.273.7-272,069
2013-2015Hidalgo184.8162.9206.7-31913,824
2013-2015Lea120.9115.9125.9-2,230207,794
2013-2015Lincoln115.5107.7123.3-1,05460,584
2013-2015Los Alamos7265.478.6-48953,582
2013-2015Luna271.4260.7282.2-2,59974,224
2013-2015McKinley198.1192204.1-3,987223,084
2013-2015Mora132.6115.9149.3-28414,313
2013-2015Otero145.4140.4150.4-3,288196,982
2013-2015Quay134.5121147.9-45825,918
2013-2015Rio Arriba213.7206221.4-3,028119,537
2013-2015Roosevelt125.4116.2134.6-71959,624
2013-2015Sandoval155.8152.2159.4-7,345413,628
2013-2015San Juan171166.9175-6,726389,713
2013-2015San Miguel217.5208.5226.6-2,32785,358
2013-2015Santa Fe98.595.8101.1-5,691442,456
2013-2015Sierra148.9135.6162.1-78434,468
2013-2015Socorro220.8208.7233-1,32552,745
2013-2015Taos141.8135148.6-1,911100,044
2013-2015Torrance128.6119.2138-78147,242
2013-2015Union78.864.992.8-13113,287
2013-2015Valencia148.1143.5152.8-3,931229,454
2013-2015New Mexico152.5151.5153.4-107,8656,298,290
2014-2016Bernalillo129.1127.6130.6-29,0312,035,715
2014-2016Catron4433.154.9-9810,900
2014-2016Chaves204.4198.4210.4-4,417198,197
2014-2016Cibola239.4229.4249.5-2,18382,471
2014-2016Colfax111.1101.6120.5-63738,762
2014-2016Curry133.5127.4139.6-1,844151,735
2014-2016De Baca135.7106.5164.8-1035,695
2014-2016Dona Ana164.5161.4167.6-11,035648,671
2014-2016Eddy162.9157.1168.7-3,036171,118
2014-2016Grant137.8130.7145-1,71387,439
2014-2016Guadalupe211.2189.3233-36313,470
2014-2016Harding46.628.464.7-252,060
2014-2016Hidalgo157.5137.9177-28413,637
2014-2016Lea109104.3113.8-2,024209,290
2014-2016Lincoln110.4102.6118.2-99960,055
2014-2016Los Alamos64.258.170.4-44454,016
2014-2016Luna222212.1232-2,08074,228
2014-2016McKinley185.9180191.7-3,789222,428
2014-2016Mora107.192122.3-23114,098
2014-2016Otero142.2137.2147.2-3,231196,984
2014-2016Quay122109.1134.8-41525,646
2014-2016Rio Arriba198.4191205.8-2,857119,298
2014-2016Roosevelt117.1108.3126-67659,094
2014-2016Sandoval141137.6144.4-6,809418,209
2014-2016San Juan159.8155.8163.7-6,345387,924
2014-2016San Miguel194185.3202.7-2,05884,737
2014-2016Santa Fe89.186.591.7-5,198444,145
2014-2016Sierra142.9130155.9-75634,228
2014-2016Socorro198.6186.9210.2-1,19052,352
2014-2016Taos134.6128141.2-1,830100,111
2014-2016Torrance104.896.4113.2-65847,078
2014-2016Union72.158.885.4-12013,139
2014-2016Valencia132.4127.9136.8-3,559228,813
2014-2016New Mexico140139.1140.9-100,0386,305,742
2015-2017Bernalillo115.2113.8116.6-26,2402,038,559
2015-2017Catron40.229.950.6-9610,821
2015-2017Chaves199.2193.3205.2-4,342197,816
2015-2017Cibola219.9210.3229.6-2,00982,162
2015-2017Colfax136.7126.1147.3-77038,039
2015-2017Curry121.7115.9127.5-1,695151,004
2015-2017De Baca10780.9133.1-825,616
2015-2017Dona Ana165.4162.3168.5-11,232649,518
2015-2017Eddy150.9145.4156.5-2,840172,579
2015-2017Grant119.1112.3125.9-1,45086,329
2015-2017Guadalupe198.6177220.3-33713,406
2015-2017Harding45.227.562.9-252,071
2015-2017Hidalgo142123.5160.6-25513,440
2015-2017Lea99.494.9103.9-1,885210,827
2015-2017Lincoln97.890.3105.2-88759,430
2015-2017Los Alamos58.252.564-41554,939
2015-2017Luna193.9184.5203.3-1,80774,006
2015-2017McKinley181.4175.6187.2-3,717220,906
2015-2017Mora85.472.298.6-18913,926
2015-2017Otero125.5120.8130.1-2,857196,675
2015-2017Quay97.586.1108.8-33725,506
2015-2017Rio Arriba188.8181.6196-2,763118,846
2015-2017Roosevelt111.9103.2120.6-64658,666
2015-2017Sandoval132.9129.6136.2-6,549422,825
2015-2017San Juan152148.2155.8-6,101386,010
2015-2017San Miguel168.7160.5176.9-1,79984,349
2015-2017Santa Fe82.880.385.3-4,837446,484
2015-2017Sierra125.3113.5137-69834,089
2015-2017Socorro177165.7188.2-1,04252,106
2015-2017Taos120.6114.3126.9-1,66799,587
2015-2017Torrance97.289.1105.3-60847,081
2015-2017Union80.466.394.4-13412,953
2015-2017Valencia123.4119.1127.7-3,319228,182
2015-2017New Mexico129.9129130.7-93,6306,308,753

Data Notes

Diseases listed on hospital discharge records are assigned specific ICD codes. Under the ICD, the primary condition/ disease leading to the hospitalization is listed first. There may also be up to eight additional conditions which contributed to the hospitalization, for a total of nine possible conditions. These data are based on the ICD codes listed on the hospital discharge records, and thus are about the number of discharges, not the number of persons hospitalized, over the course of the year. This means a person admitted to a hospital multiple times over the year will be counted each time as a separate discharge from the hospital. Except for age-specific rates, rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 US Standard Populations.

Data Sources

  • Hospital Inpatient Discharge Data, New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.

References and Community Resources

For more information on programs or services provided by the NM Department of Health, Diabetes Prevention and Control Program, call (505) 841-5859. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Diabetes Prevention Program www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention/about.htm CDC Registry of Recognized (NPPP) Programs https://nccd.cdc.gov/DDT_DPRP/Registry.aspx CDC Registry of Recognized (NPPP) Programs: Virtual or Online Programs https://nccd.cdc.gov/DDT_DPRP/State.aspx?STATE=OTH Healthy People 2020 Diabetes Objectives: http://healthypeople.gov/2020/topicsobjectives2020/objectiveslist.aspx?topicId=8 The Community Guide- Guide to Community Preventive Services: www.thecommunityguide.org/diabetes/index.html American Diabetes Association: www.diabetes.org/home.jsp US Preventive Services Task Force www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Name/tools-and-resources-for-better-preventive-care; www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Tools/ConsumerInfo/Index/information-for-consumers Costs for Diabetes and Prediabetes in New Mexico, 2012, American Diabetes Association, 2014.

More Resources and Links

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

Page Content Updated On 12/19/2018, Published on 12/19/2018
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Tue, 18 June 2019 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Wed, 19 Dec 2018 15:10:12 MST