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Complete Health Indicator Report of Diabetes - Diagnosed Pre-diabetes Prevalence

Definition

Pre-diabetes prevalence is the estimated percentage of adult New Mexicans 18 years and older with diagnosed pre-diabetes.

Numerator

Number of New Mexico adults (18 and older) who either responded, "Yes" to the BRFSS question: "Have you ever been told by a doctor or other health professional that you have pre-diabetes or borderline diabetes?" OR responded "No, pre-diabetes or borderline diabetes" to the core Diabetes Prevalence question "Have you ever been told by a doctor or other health professional that you have diabetes?"

Denominator

Number of New Mexico adults (18 and older) who responded to the BRFSS within the survey year.

Data Interpretation Issues

Data for this indicator report are from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), an ongoing survey of adults regarding their health-related behaviors, health conditions, and preventive services. Data are collected in all 50 states, D.C., and U.S. territories. Responses have been weighted to reflect the New Mexico adult population by age, sex, ethnicity, geographic region, marital status, education level, home ownership and type of phone ownership. U.S. value is the median value of 50 states and D.C. The survey is conducted using scientific telephone survey methods for landline and cellular phones (with cellular since 2011). The landline phone portion of the survey excludes adults living in group quarters such as college dormitories, nursing homes, military barracks, and prisons. The cellular phone portion of the survey includes adult students living in college dormitories but excludes other group quarters. Beginning with 2011, the BRFSS updated its surveillance methods by adding in calls to cell phones and changing its weighting methods. These changes improve BRFSS' ability to take into account the increasing proportion of U.S. adults using only cellular telephones as well as to adjust survey data to improve the representativeness of the estimates generated from the survey. Results have been adjusted for the probability of selection of the respondent, and have been weighted to the adult population by age, gender, phone type, detailed race/ethnicity, renter/owner, education, marital status, and geographic area. Lastly and importantly, these changes mean that the data from years prior to 2011 are not directly comparable to data from 2011 and beyond. Please see the [https://ibis.health.state.nm.us/view/docs/Query/BRFSS/BRFSS_fact_sheet_Aug2012.pdf BRFSS Method Change Factsheet]. The "missing" and "don't know" responses are removed before calculating a percentage.

Why Is This Important?

People with pre-diabetes have blood glucose levels higher than normal, but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that without weight loss and physical activity, 15-30% of adults with pre-diabetes will develop diabetes within five years. People with pre-diabetes are also more likely to develop heart disease and stroke. It is very important that adults at risk of pre-diabetes be tested as there is great value in the ability to take action as early as possible. People who are diagnosed with pre-diabetes can learn about their condition and build the skills and confidence necessary to slow or prevent progression to diabetes.

Healthy People Objective: D-16, Increase prevention behaviors in persons at high risk for diabetes with pre-diabetes

U.S. Target: Not applicable, see subobjectives in this category

Other Objectives

HP2020 objectives D-16 through D-16.3 focus on prevention of progression from pre-diabetes to diabetes by promotion of physical activity, reducing body weight among those who are overweight or obese, and improved nutrition. (www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topicsobjectives2020/objectiveslist.aspx?topicId=8)

How Are We Doing?

The BRFSS data provided here only identify NM adults with diagnosed pre-diabetes prevalence. However, we know that pre-diabetes is severely under-diagnosed across the nation and in New Mexico. According to the 2012-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), one in three American adults (33.4%) had pre-diabetes (although fewer than 3 out of 10 adults with pre-diabetes had been previously diagnosed). Applying NHANES estimates to the New Mexico population, nearly half a million NM adults were estimated to have pre-diabetes in 2017. However, based on 2017 BRFSS rates of diagnosed pre-diabetes in NM (10.1%), only about 3 out of 10 NM adults with pre-diabetes were aware of their condition. The 2017 national BRFSS estimate of diagnosed pre-diabetes was 8.4%.

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

Since 2016, the prevalence of diagnosed pre-diabetes has been statistically significantly higher in New Mexico than in the U.S., as a whole. In previous years, there was no difference. As described above, about two-thirds of those with pre-diabetes are unaware that they have the condition. It is not known whether the recent increase in diagnosed pre-diabetes in NM is due to an increase in prevalence of the condition or simply improvements in testing and diagnosis. It will be very important to continue to monitor diagnosed pre-diabetes and NHANES estimates of the true prevalence. It is expected that improvements in testing and diagnosis will eventually bring the two estimates together, and, most importantly, will provide adults the information they need to make lifestyle changes that will delay or prevent progression to diabetes.

What Is Being Done?

The NM Department of Health Diabetes Prevention and Control Program (DPCP) works with health care providers, community partners, agencies and coalitions to increase delivery of the National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) throughout our state. The NDPP, a one-year lifestyle balance curriculum developed by the CDC for adults with pre-diabetes, is based on the original Diabetes Prevention Program study that demonstrated that 5-7% weight loss achieved and maintained through regular, moderate physical activity and improved nutrition, prevented or delayed the progression of pre-diabetes to diabetes by 58% (71% for adults 60 years and older) compared to standard lifestyle recommendations. The DPCP is working to increase access to, and participation in, the NDPP across New Mexico by focusing on the following four strategies: 1) awareness; 2) availability and support; 3) screening, testing and referrals; and 4) coverage.

Evidence-based Practices

Diabetes and its complications can be prevented, delayed and/or managed through participation in evidence-based programs, including the National Diabetes Prevention Program or NDPP (provided in a clinical, community, or web-based setting), the Diabetes Self-Management Education Program or DSMEP (provided in a community or web-based setting), and Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support programs or DSME/S (usually provided in a clinical setting). Improving the quality of clinical care for people with and at risk for diabetes is also an evidence-based practice. The following DPCP activities are in alignment with these accepted programs and practices: 1. Increase use of the NDPP to prevent or delay onset of type 2 diabetes among people at high risk by raising awareness about pre-diabetes and the NDPP, increasing delivery sites, facilitating the screening and referral process, and working to obtain health insurance coverage (including Medicaid) for the program. 2. Increase access to sustainable self-management education and support services (DSMEP and DSME/S) to improve control of A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol, and to promote tobacco cessation, by increasing delivery sites, facilitating the referral process, and working to obtain health insurance coverage (including Medicaid) for the programs. 3. Implement evidence-based worksite programs and policies that help people prevent or manage diabetes and related chronic conditions, promote tobacco cessation, and help employees improve control of their A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol. 4. Improve health outcomes for people with and at risk for diabetes by supporting health care organizations to improve quality of care through use of the Planned Care Model, Patient Centered Medical Home, and Electronic Health Record. Within these organizations, support policy and protocol implementation that institutionalize and help sustain quality care improvements. 5. Promote the sustainability of Community Health Workers (CHWs) involved in providing diabetes prevention and management services.

Available Services

-Professional development opportunities provided by the New Mexico Diabetes Advisory Council, with continuing education credits, focusing on prediabetes and diabetes, and other related chronic health conditions such as obesity, smoking, and cardiovascular disease. -Technical assistance to clinics and primary care providers to support system changes that improve health outcomes (e.g. AIC, blood pressure, LDL cholesterol and smoking cessation) -Support for community-based prevention and management initiatives such as the National Diabetes Prevention Program, Diabetes and Chronic Disease Self-Management Programs, and Kitchen Creations cooking schools for people with diabetes. -Technical assistance with data, surveillance, and epidemiology For more information on programs or services provided by the NM Department of Health, Diabetes Prevention and Control Program, call (505) 841-5859.


Related Indicators

Related Relevant Population Characteristics Indicators:


Related Health Care System Factors Indicators:


Related Risk Factors Indicators:


Related Health Status Outcomes Indicators:




Graphical Data Views

Diagnosed Pre-diabetes Prevalence in Adults Ages 18 and Over by Year, New Mexico and U.S., Age-adjusted 2011-2017

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confidence limits

The prevalence of diagnosed pre-diabetes was statistically significantly higher in 2016 and 2017 than in earlier years. As pre-diabetes continues to be under-diagnosed, the increase in prevalence may be due to a true increase in the prevalence of pre-diabetes or simply an improvement in testing and diagnosis, or some combination of the two. The prevalence of diagnosed pre-diabetes in NM has been similar to that of the U.S., as a whole.
BRFSS by weighting method by NM vs. U.S.YearPercentage Diagnosed with Pre-diabetes, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 14
New Mexico, New Weighting Method20116.55.97.2-6769,263
New Mexico, New Weighting Method20127.16.47.9-6398,604
New Mexico, New Weighting Method20136.65.97.4-7159,140
New Mexico, New Weighting Method20147.66.88.5-7718,713
New Mexico, New Weighting Method20157.36.48.4-5716,539
New Mexico, New Weighting Method20169.28.210.3-6615,811
New Mexico, New Weighting Method201710.19.011.3-7036,316
U.S., New Weighting Method20114.72011 Crude Median
U.S., New Weighting Method20126.02012 Crude Median
U.S., New Weighting Method20136.62013 Crude Median
U.S., New Weighting Method20147.12014 Crude Median
U.S., New Weighting Method20158.42015 Crude Median
U.S., New Weighting Method20167.32016 Crude Median
U.S., New Weighting Method20178.42017 Crude Median

Data Notes

Age-adjusted to U.S. 2000 population (except for rates by age group). The estimates are adjusted by several weighting factors which adjust for probability of selection of the given survey respondent and for demographic differences between the sample an.   Pre-diabetes prevalence for New Mexico and the U.S. is a weighted percent, age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. Census population.

Data Sources

  • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, together with New Mexico Department of Health, Injury and Behavioral Epidemiology Bureau.
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Chronic Disease Indicators BRFSS Data, [https://www.cdc.gov/cdi/].


Diagnosed Pre-diabetes Prevalence in Adults by Age Group and Sex, New Mexico, 2016-2017

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confidence limits

Diagnosed pre-diabetes is associated with age. The prevalence of diagnosed pre-diabetes was statistically significantly higher in the four older age groups, 45-54 through 75+ than the three younger age groups. However, there was not a statistically significant difference between the four older age groups. The prevalence of diagnosed pre-diabetes was similar across the four older age groups. Within each age group, there was not a statistically significant difference between males and females.
Sex: Males vs. FemalesAge GroupPercentage Diagnosed with Pre-diabetesLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 21
Male18-242.41.15.2Unstable9304
Male25-346.03.89.3-29532
Male35-446.13.99.3-41623
Male45-5410.88.314.0-90801
Male55-6413.711.116.7-1491,188
Male65-7413.811.316.8-1571,155
Male75+10.27.713.5-75696
Female18-245.22.510.6Unstable11241
Female25-348.96.312.5-47632
Female35-449.06.811.8-67763
Female45-5412.29.715.3-126989
Female55-6416.313.819.2-2261,564
Female65-7415.212.918.0-2271,555
Female75+10.68.113.7-1101,082
All18-243.72.16.4-20545
All25-347.45.69.7-761,164
All35-447.55.99.6-1081,386
All45-5411.59.713.6-2161,791
All55-6415.113.217.1-3752,753
All65-7414.612.816.5-3842,710
All75+10.48.612.6-1851,778

Data Notes

Age-adjusted to U.S. 2000 population (except for rates by age group). The estimates are adjusted by several weighting factors which adjust for probability of selection of the given survey respondent and for demographic differences between the sample an.   2016-2017 multi-year NM BRFSS.

Data Source

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, together with New Mexico Department of Health, Injury and Behavioral Epidemiology Bureau.


Diagnosed Pre-diabetes Prevalence by Race/Ethnicity, New Mexico, Age-adjusted 2015-2017

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confidence limits

The American Indian/Alaska Native rate was statistically significantly higher than that of white adults. There was no significant difference between other Race/Ethnic groups.
Race/EthnicityPercentage Diagnosed with Pre-diabetes, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 7
American Indian/Alaska Native12.19.914.8-2211,869
Asian/Pacific Islander5.52.511.5Unstable10137
Black/African American7.64.413-17208
Hispanic9.48.510.4-6426,002
White7.86.98.8-99610,004
New Mexico8.98.39.5-1,93518,666
United States7.32016 Crude Median

Data Notes

Age-adjusted to U.S. 2000 population (except for rates by age group). The estimates are adjusted by several weighting factors which adjust for probability of selection of the given survey respondent and for demographic differences between the sample an.   Source: 2015-2017 multi-year NM BRFSS, age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. Census.

Data Sources

  • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, together with New Mexico Department of Health, Injury and Behavioral Epidemiology Bureau.
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Chronic Disease Indicators BRFSS Data, [https://www.cdc.gov/cdi/].


Diagnosed Pre-diabetes Prevalence in Adults by Race/Ethnicity and Sex, New Mexico, Age-adjusted 2015-2017

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confidence limits

Within each Race/Ethnic group, the rates for males and females were statistically similar with the exception of Hispanic adults. In this group, the prevalence of diagnosed pre-diabetes was statistically significantly higher in females than males.
Sex: Males vs. FemalesRace/EthnicityPercentage Diagnosed with Pre-diabetes, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 18
MaleAmerican Indian/Alaska Native12.38.916.7-84762
MaleAsian/Pacific Islander2.30.68.6Very Unstable367
MaleBlack/African American8.84.217.8Unstable995
MaleHispanic7.86.69.2-2372,611
MaleWhite7.26.18.5-4094,289
MaleNew Mexico8.07.18.9-7658,051
FemaleAmerican Indian/Alaska Native11.99.414.8-1371,107
FemaleAsian/Pacific Islander8.33.319.0Unstable770
FemaleBlack/African American6.32.813.6Unstable8113
FemaleHispanic10.99.612.4-4053,391
FemaleWhite8.47.110.0-5875,713
FemaleNew Mexico9.88.910.7-1,17010,613
AllAmerican Indian/Alaska Native12.19.914.8-2211,869
AllAsian/Pacific Islander5.52.511.5Unstable10137
AllBlack/African American7.64.413.0-17208
AllHispanic9.48.510.4-6426,002
AllWhite7.86.98.8-99610,004
AllNew Mexico8.98.39.5-1,93518,666

Data Notes

Age-adjusted to U.S. 2000 population (except for rates by age group). The estimates are adjusted by several weighting factors which adjust for probability of selection of the given survey respondent and for demographic differences between the sample an

Data Sources

  • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, together with New Mexico Department of Health, Injury and Behavioral Epidemiology Bureau.
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Chronic Disease Indicators BRFSS Data, [https://www.cdc.gov/cdi/].


Diagnosed Pre-diabetes Prevalence by County, New Mexico, Age-adjusted 2014-2017

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confidence limits

County rates: In the combined period 2014-2017, there was little difference between counties. Three county rates were statistically significantly lower than the statewide age-adjusted prevalence rate of 8.3%: Grant, Lea, and Lincoln.
CountyPercentage Diagnosed with Pre-diabetes, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 34
Bernalillo8.87.79.9-3933,882
Catron6.83.413.1Unstable11126
Chaves10.68.413.4-117962
Cibola10.3714.9-87829
Colfax5.53.29.2-18226
Curry7.45.310.3-51655
De Baca13.14.930.3Unstable459
Dona Ana8.87.510.3-2542,514
Eddy7.769.9-91897
Grant5.13.47.6-35496
Guadalupe114.624Unstable759
Harding**Unstable25
Hidalgo9.33.920.5Unstable761
Lea4.43.26-51923
Lincoln3.72.36.1-33525
Los Alamos8.54.515.4Unstable24304
Luna7.84.712.9-27309
McKinley9.7811.5-2011,737
Mora11.6621.2Unstable1598
Otero6.758.8-88930
Quay9.14.816.6Unstable17198
Rio Arriba9.2711.8-110874
Roosevelt7.14.411.2-26317
Sandoval9.87.412.8-1401,160
San Juan8.17.19.3-3743,906
San Miguel8.45.812-51451
Santa Fe9.68.211.2-2532,362
Sierra7.84.214.1Unstable19230
Socorro138.419.5-29223
Taos7.74.313.5-43536
Torrance10.65.619.2Unstable14124
Union3.50.715.6Very Unstable294
Valencia6.64.39.9-65665
New Mexico8.5892,70627,379

Data Notes

Age-adjusted to U.S. 2000 population (except for rates by age group). The estimates are adjusted by several weighting factors which adjust for probability of selection of the given survey respondent and for demographic differences between the sample an.   The BRFSS data used for this indicator report were weighted to be representative of the five New Mexico Region populations. A given county's population demographics may differ from the demographics of the region in which the county is located.

Data Sources

  • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, together with New Mexico Department of Health, Injury and Behavioral Epidemiology Bureau.
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Chronic Disease Indicators BRFSS Data, [https://www.cdc.gov/cdi/].


Diagnosed Pre-diabetes Prevalence by Household Income, New Mexico, Age-adjusted 2015-2017

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confidence limits

Household Income: Income and wealth influence the health of communities and individuals. Pre-diabetes prevalence was statistically significantly higher among the two income categories, $15,000-$24,999 and $25,000-$49,999, than the highest income category.
IncomePercentage Diagnosed with Pre-diabetes, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 5
Less Than $15,0009.0%7.5%10.7%-2532,355
$15,000 to $24,9999.9%8.5%11.5%-3763,525
$25,000 - $49,9999.5%8.2%11.0%-4684,096
$50,000 - $74,9998.4%7.1%10.0%-2462,279
$75,000 and Over6.9%5.9%8.1%-3523,760

Data Notes

Age-adjusted to U.S. 2000 population (except for rates by age group). The estimates are adjusted by several weighting factors which adjust for probability of selection of the given survey respondent and for demographic differences between the sample an

Data Source

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, together with New Mexico Department of Health, Injury and Behavioral Epidemiology Bureau.


Diagnosed Pre-diabetes Prevalence by Education Level, New Mexico, Age-adjusted 2015-2017

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confidence limits

The 2015-2017 age-adjusted prevalence of diagnosed pre-diabetes education level.
Education LevelPercentage Diagnosed with Pre-diabetes, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 4
Less Than High School9.0%6.9%11.5%-1892,187
H.S. Grad or G.E.D.9.3%8.3%10.5%-5395,195
Some Post High School9.1%8.2%10.2%-5605,127
College Graduate8.4%7.3%9.8%-6466,121

Data Notes

Age-adjusted to U.S. 2000 population (except for rates by age group). The estimates are adjusted by several weighting factors which adjust for probability of selection of the given survey respondent and for demographic differences between the sample an

Data Source

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, together with New Mexico Department of Health, Injury and Behavioral Epidemiology Bureau.


Diagnosed Pre-diabetes Prevalence in Adults Ages 18 and Over by Urban and Rural Counties, New Mexico, 2015-2017

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confidence limits

Urban and Rural: There was no statistically significant difference in Urban/Rural groups of counties.
Urban Versus Rural CountiesPercentage Diagnosed with Pre-diabetes, Age-adjustedLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 6
Metropolitan Counties9.18.010.3-4524,170
Small Metro Counties9.78.710.8-6426,067
Mixed Urban-Rural8.17.39.0-7116,929
Rural Counties8.76.711.2-1181,284
New Mexico8.98.39.5-1,93518,666
U.S.7.32016 Crude Median

Data Notes

Age-adjusted to U.S. 2000 population (except for rates by age group). The estimates are adjusted by several weighting factors which adjust for probability of selection of the given survey respondent and for demographic differences between the sample an

Data Sources

  • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, together with New Mexico Department of Health, Injury and Behavioral Epidemiology Bureau.
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Chronic Disease Indicators BRFSS Data, [https://www.cdc.gov/cdi/].

References and Community Resources

NM Department of Health, Diabetes Prevention and Control Program, call (505) 841-5859. National Diabetes Prevention Program Evidence-based lifestyle interventions for preventing type 2 diabetes for communities www.cdc.gov/diabetes/projects/prevention_program.htm Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: 1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Dept of Health and Human Services; 2017. 2. Diabetes Public Health Resource: www.cdc.gov/diabetes/consumer/index.htm Fact Sheets on Physical Activity: www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/sgr/fact.htm Diabetes Data and Trends: http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/ddtstrs/FactSheet.aspx 3. Guide To Community Preventive Services [information on community-level evidence-based practices]: Diabetes www.thecommunityguide.org/diabetes/index.html Obesity www.thecommunityguide.org/obesity/index.html Physical Activity www.thecommunityguide.org/pa/index.html American Diabetes Association: www.diabetes.org National Diabetes Education Program www.ndep.nih.gov/ US Preventive Health Task Force (clinical preventive services) www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/bv.fcgi?rid=hstat3.chapter.26340 Joslin Diabetes Center: www.joslin.org 4. 2012-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, National Center for Health Statistics. 5. New Mexico Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2011 through 2017.

More Resources and Links

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

Page Content Updated On 12/18/2018, Published on 01/03/2019
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Fri, 23 August 2019 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Thu, 3 Jan 2019 13:20:29 MST