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Complete Health Indicator Report of Food Insecurity

Definition

Food insecurity refers to USDA's measure of lack of access, at times, to enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members and limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate foods. Food insecure households are not necessarily food insecure all the time. Food insecurity may reflect a household's need to make trade-offs between important basic needs, such as housing or medical bills, and purchasing nutritionally adequate foods.

Numerator

The number of persons living in food-insecure households.

Denominator

The number of persons in the population.

Data Interpretation Issues

Food insecurity is based on a series of questions on the U.S. Current Population Survey called the "Core Food Security Module." The module asks about a variety of food security conditions (e.g., worried food would run out, could not afford balanced meal, did not eat for a whole day because they could not afford enough food, etc.). Food insecurity was measured by the number of food insecure conditions experienced in the household and the frequency with which each condition was experienced in that household. "Food Insecurity" includes households with low and very low food security. for more information, visit the USDA Economic Research Service, [http://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/food-security-in-the-united-states.aspx Food Security in the United States] web page.

Why Is This Important?

Inconsistent access to adequate amounts of nutritious food can have a negative impact on the health of individuals of all ages. The USDA estimates that as of 2017, 326,000 people, including over 118,000 children, in New Mexico are food insecure. That means 1 in 6 individuals (15.5%) and 1 in 4 children (24%) live in homes without consistent access to adequate to adequate food for everyone to live healthy, active lives. In the US, adults in food insecure households are much more likely than food secure adults to have hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and other chronic health problems. Although food insecurity is harmful to any individual, it can be particularly devastating among children because they are more vulnerable to potential long-term consequences for their future physical and mental health and academic achievement.

Other Objectives

New Mexico Community Health Status Indicator (CHSI)

How Are We Doing?

The USDA estimates that as of 2017, 326,000 people, including over 118,000 children, in New Mexico are food insecure. That means 1 in 6 individuals (15.5%) and 1 in 4 children (24%) live in homes without consistent access to adequate food. McKinley, Luna, and Cibola Counties had the highest percentages of food insecurity for all persons and for children.

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

In 2015, the top five states with the highest rate of food-insecure children under 18 were Mississippi, Arkansas, New Mexico, Alabama, and Arizona.

What Is Being Done?

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) play a critical role in helping low-income families break out of the cycle of hunger and diet-related disease. Both programs augment households' food budgets, allowing them to purchase more healthful foods, and provide nutrition education to participants.


Graphical Data Views

Food Insecurity Rate by Year, All Persons, New Mexico and U.S. 2009-2017

::chart - missing::

NM vs. U.S.YearPercentage in Food Insecure HouseholdsNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 18
New Mexico200917.1%348,1772,036,124
New Mexico201018.5%382,0612,065,194
New Mexico201120.1%418,3922,081,550
New Mexico201218.6%389,1582,092,246
New Mexico201317.3%362,6312,096,134
New Mexico201417.2%361,1162,099,510
New Mexico201516.0%336,4232,102,646
New Mexico201615.8%332,3672,103,586
New Mexico201715.5%325,8912,102,521
United States200916.6%
United States201016.1%
United States201116.4%
United States201215.9%
United States201315.8%
United States201415.4%
United States201513.4%
United States201612.9%
United States201712.5%

Data Sources

  • U.S. Census Bureau Current Population Survey and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service. Downloaded from https://www.ers.usda.gov/topics/food-nutrition-assistance/food-security-in-the-us/.
  • New Mexico Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.


Food Insecurity Rate by Year, Children Age 0 to 17 Years, New Mexico and U.S. 2009-2017

::chart - missing::

NM vs. U.S.YearPercentage in Food Insecure HouseholdsNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 18
New Mexico200927.3%141,628518,784
New Mexico201028.7%148,840518,608
New Mexico201130.6%158,365517,532
New Mexico201229.2%150,226514,471
New Mexico201328.3%144,355510,089
New Mexico201427.2%137,645506,046
New Mexico201525.0%125,579502,317
New Mexico201625.6%127,285497,207
New Mexico201724.1%118,466491,559
United States200923.2%
United States201021.6%
United States201122.4%
United States201221.6%
United States201321.4%
United States201420.9%
United States201517.9%
United States201617.5%
United States201717.0%

Data Sources

  • U.S. Census Bureau Current Population Survey and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service. Downloaded from https://www.ers.usda.gov/topics/food-nutrition-assistance/food-security-in-the-us/.
  • New Mexico Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.


Food Insecurity Rate by County, All Persons, New Mexico 2017

::chart - missing::

CountyPercentage in Food Insecure HouseholdsNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 35
Bernalillo14.9%101,294679,827
Catron18.7%6703,581
Chaves14.8%9,72865,727
Cibola19.8%5,37827,160
Colfax16.3%2,02112,399
Curry18.0%9,00450,024
De Baca16.0%2971,859
Dona Ana15.5%33,579216,637
Eddy13.1%7,58557,901
Grant15.3%4,31028,168
Guadalupe9.4%4214,474
Harding16.7%117698
Hidalgo14.9%6574,412
Lea13.3%9,37270,463
Lincoln15.4%3,01919,601
Los Alamos12.7%2,38118,749
Luna20.7%5,06224,456
McKinley26.0%18,92172,772
Mora11.4%5244,593
Otero17.9%11,78965,858
Quay16.8%1,4238,469
Rio Arriba13.2%5,19439,350
Roosevelt18.8%3,64919,409
Sandoval14.2%20,264142,705
San Juan19.6%25,113128,125
San Miguel14.6%4,09328,037
Santa Fe12.4%18,562149,694
Sierra19.0%2,14811,305
Socorro16.4%2,84117,323
Taos15.0%4,94632,975
Torrance18.5%2,91015,728
Union14.1%5994,250
Valencia13.4%10,15675,790
New Mexico15.5%325,8912,102,521
U.S.12.5%40,044,000

Data Sources

  • U.S. Census Bureau Current Population Survey and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service, modeled and presented in the Feeding America, Map the Meal Gap Report. Downloaded from http://www.feedingamerica.org/hunger-in-america.
  • New Mexico Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.


Food Insecurity Rate by County, Children Age 0 to 17 Years, New Mexico 2017

::chart - missing::

CountyPercentage in Food Insecure HouseholdsNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 35
Bernalillo22.5%3,383150,362
Catron28.4%13444
Chaves24.6%43017,470
Cibola30.4%1986,506
Colfax25.9%602,308
Curry25.1%33513,353
De Baca20.8%9413
Dona Ana27.1%1,45953,842
Eddy21.2%32315,256
Grant25.0%1445,748
Guadalupe20.6%19945
Harding27.8%394
Hidalgo25.9%261,013
Lea22.0%46621,195
Lincoln21.4%783,640
Los Alamos17.1%734,252
Luna33.4%2166,456
McKinley33.5%71121,225
Mora24.2%20832
Otero25.9%40015,439
Quay27.1%501,830
Rio Arriba24.7%2319,337
Roosevelt26.7%1254,677
Sandoval22.0%73933,584
San Juan26.6%92334,715
San Miguel27.1%1435,264
Santa Fe20.9%57727,610
Sierra27.8%501,782
Socorro26.6%1053,935
Taos24.9%1485,958
Torrance27.2%913,356
Union23.1%18795
Valencia24.1%43217,925
New Mexico24.1%11,847491,559
U.S.17.0%12,540,000

Data Sources

  • U.S. Census Bureau Current Population Survey and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service, modeled and presented in the Feeding America, Map the Meal Gap Report. Downloaded from http://www.feedingamerica.org/hunger-in-america.
  • New Mexico Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.


Food Insecurity Rate for Households by U.S. States, 2015-2017

::chart - missing::

17.9% of New Mexico households experienced Low or Very Low food security during the period 2015-2017. New Mexico had the highest level of household food insecurity of all states, followed by Arkansas, Louisiana and Mississippi.
StatePercentage of Households
Record Count: 52
Alabama16.3%
Alaska11.6%
Arizona13.1%
Arkansas17.4%
California11.2%
Colorado9.2%
Connecticut12.2%
Delaware11.1%
District of Columbia11.2%
Florida11.9%
Georgia13.0%
Hawaii7.4%
Idaho11.0%
Illinois11.2%
Indiana13.6%
Iowa10.5%
Kansas13.3%
Kentucky14.7%
Louisiana17.3%
Maine14.4%
Maryland10.4%
Massachucetts10.2%
Michigan13.6%
Minnesota9.5%
Mississippi17.2%
Missouri12.8%
Montana11.4%
Nebraska13.5%
Nevada12.4%
New Hampshire9.4%
New Jersey8.6%
New Mexico17.9%
New York10.9%
North Carolina14.4%
North Dakota9.0%
Ohio13.7%
Oklahoma15.0%
Oregon12.9%
Pennsylvania12.1%
Rhode Island12.4%
South Carolina11.7%
South Dakota11.4%
Tennessee12.9%
Texas14.0%
Utah10.7%
Vermont9.8%
Virginia10.1%
Washington10.8%
West Virginia14.9%
Wisconsin10.0%
Wyoming13.2%
United States12.3%

Data Source

U.S. Census Bureau Current Population Survey and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service. Downloaded from https://www.ers.usda.gov/topics/food-nutrition-assistance/food-security-in-the-us/.


Food Security: Percentage of Adults with Chronic Disease by Food Security Status, U.S., 2011-2015

::chart - missing::

Food Security StatusChronic ConditionPercentage of Adults with Chronic Condition
Record Count: 40
High Food SecurityHypertension19.7%
High Food SecurityCoronary Heart Disease2.0%
High Food SecurityHepatitis2.6%
High Food SecurityStroke1.6%
High Food SecurityCancer3.3%
High Food SecurityAsthma7.4%
High Food SecurityDiabetes6.8%
High Food SecurityArthritis13.5%
High Food SecurityChronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease4.9%
High Food SecurityKidney disease1.3%
Marginal Food SecurityHypertension23.6%
Marginal Food SecurityCoronary Heart Disease2.9%
Marginal Food SecurityHepatitis2.8%
Marginal Food SecurityStroke2.0%
Marginal Food SecurityCancer3.8%
Marginal Food SecurityAsthma9.6%
Marginal Food SecurityDiabetes8.7%
Marginal Food SecurityArthritis17.2%
Marginal Food SecurityChronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease7.2%
Marginal Food SecurityKidney disease2.0%
Low Food SecurityHypertension28.0%
Low Food SecurityCoronary Heart Disease3.7%
Low Food SecurityHepatitis3.8%
Low Food SecurityStroke3.4%
Low Food SecurityCancer4.7%
Low Food SecurityAsthma11.5%
Low Food SecurityDiabetes11.1%
Low Food SecurityArthritis21.6%
Low Food SecurityChronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease8.9%
Low Food SecurityKidney disease2.6%
Very low Food SecurityHypertension36.1%
Very low Food SecurityCoronary Heart Disease5.6%
Very low Food SecurityHepatitis5.0%
Very low Food SecurityStroke5.0%
Very low Food SecurityCancer5.8%
Very low Food SecurityAsthma16.5%
Very low Food SecurityDiabetes14.0%
Very low Food SecurityArthritis30.0%
Very low Food SecurityChronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease15.0%
Very low Food SecurityKidney disease5.0%

Data Notes

From the publication: Christian A. Gregory, Alisha Coleman-Jensen. Food Insecurity, Chronic Disease, and Health Among Working-Age Adults, ERR-235, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, July 2017.

Data Source

U.S. Census Bureau Current Population Survey and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service, modeled and presented in the Feeding America, Map the Meal Gap Report. Downloaded from http://www.feedingamerica.org/hunger-in-america.

References and Community Resources

[https://www.ers.usda.gov/topics/food-nutrition-assistance/food-security-in-the-us/key-statistics-graphics Food Security Status of U.S. Households in 2016] [http://map.feedingamerica.org/ Map of Food Insecurity in The United States]

More Resources and Links

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

Page Content Updated On 04/29/2019, Published on 04/29/2019
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Fri, 06 December 2019 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Mon, 29 Apr 2019 16:17:40 MDT