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Complete Health Indicator Report of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease - Persons Aged 65 Years and Older

Definition

Rate per 100,000 of invasive pneumococcal disease in adults aged 65 years and older in New Mexico. Number of ''Streptococcus pneumoniae'' in New Mexico adults aged 65 years and older divided by the population of New Mexico residents adults aged 65 years and older x 100,000.

Numerator

The number of invasive, culture-confirmed cases of ''Streptococcus pneumoniae'' in adults aged 65 years and older in New Mexico in one calendar year time.

Denominator

Population of New Mexico resident adults aged 65 years and older in one calendar year time period.

Data Interpretation Issues

The rate of ''S. pneumoniae'' cases might be affected by healthcare access, healthcare testing practices, laboratory testing capacity, reporting practices, and/or surveillance deficiencies.

Why Is This Important?

''Streptococcus pneumoniae'' (pneumococcus) remains a leading infectious cause of serious illness, including bacteremia, meningitis, and pneumonia, among older adults in the United States. Use of a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) since 2000 and PCV13 since 2010 among children in the United States has reduced pneumococcal infections directly and indirectly among children, and indirectly among adults. By 2013, the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) caused by serotypes unique to PCV13 among adults aged 65 years and older had declined by approximately 50% compared with 2010, when PCV13 replaced PCV7 in the pediatric immunization schedule. However, in 2013 an estimated 13,500 cases of IPD occurred among adults aged 65 years and older. Approximately, 20% to 25% of IPD cases and 10% of community-acquired pneumonia cases in adults aged 65 years and older are caused by PCV13 serotypes and are potentially preventable with the use of PCV13 in this population. Additionally, New Mexico consistently has higher rates of IPD among adults aged 65 years and older when compared to national rates. The greatest burden of disease is seen in the American Indians/Alaska Natives (AIAN). The rate of disease among AIAN adults aged 65 years and older in 2013 was 137.6 per 100,000 compared to 34.1 per 100,000 among non- AIAN adults aged 65 years and older.

Healthy People Objective: IID-4.2, New invasive pneumococcal infections among adults aged 65 years and older

U.S. Target: 31 new cases per 100,000 adults aged 65 years and older

Other Objectives

New Mexico Community Health Status Indicator (CHSI)

How Are We Doing?

Rates of IPD have decreased across all ages, including those adults aged 65 years and older, since the introduction of PCV7 in children in 2000 and PCV13 in 2010.

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

While both the national and New Mexico rates of IP in adults aged 65 years and older are dropping, New Mexico has consistently had higher rates of IPD. In 2013, the rate of IPD adults aged 65 years and older in New Mexico was 39.5 per 100,000. The US rate was lower at 23.9 per 100,000 population.

What Is Being Done?

On August 13, 2014, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended routine use of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 [Prevnar 13, Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a subsidiary of Pfizer Inc.]) among adults aged 65 years and older. PCV13 should be administered in series with the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23 [Pneumovax23, Merck & Co., Inc.]), the vaccine currently recommended for adults aged 65 years and older. Additionally, New Mexico is one of ten national sites that participates in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Emerging Infectious Programs (EIP), Active Bacterial Core Surveillance (ABCs) which includes conducting active population-based surveillance for invasive ''Streptococcus pneumoniae''. Also, as a part of the CDC EIP ABCs network, New Mexico is participating in a study evaluating the effectiveness of PCV13 in adults aged 65 years and older.


Graphical Data Views

Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Persons Aged 65 Years and Older by Year, New Mexico and U.S., 2006-2016

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

NM vs. U.S.YearCases per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 21
New Mexico200648.840.257.5122249,939
New Mexico200747.438.955.8121255,529
New Mexico200851.342.660134261,108
New Mexico200946.538.354.7124266,681
New Mexico201040.53348111274,161
New Mexico201143.235.550.8122282,568
New Mexico201234.427.841.1102296,138
New Mexico201337.730.844.5116308,023
New Mexico201435.228.741.7111320,748
New Mexico201531.525.537.6105333,028
New Mexico20162822.433.697346,172
United States200640.21,268
United States200739.31,263
United States200840.41,338
United States200938.71,317
United States201036.41,292
United States2011351,282
United States201229.61,136
United States201330.51,224
United States201423.9994
United States2015251,158

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Data Source, 2006 and later: New Mexico Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NM-EDSS), Infectious Disease Epidemiology Bureau, New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.


Invasive Pneumococcal Disease - Persons Aged 65 Years and Older by County, New Mexico, 2012-2016

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

CountyCases per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 35
Bernalillo31.426.436.4151480,303
Catron00006,542
Chaves4526.263.82248,894
Cibola45.915.975.9919,595
Colfax12.9030.8Unstable215,504
Curry61.232.989.41829,437
De Baca00002,354
Dona Ana28.219.836.643152,541
Eddy30.213.147.21239,794
Grant28.110.745.51035,631
Guadalupe00004,185
Harding00001,132
Hidalgo00004,480
Lea43.922.465.41636,465
Lincoln18.82.335.3526,612
Los Alamos6.7019.7Unstable115,026
Luna42.617.467.81125,827
McKinley120.486154.94739,021
Mora18.4054.5Very Unstable15,427
Otero35.619.651.71953,299
Quay9.8028.9Unstable110,227
Rio Arriba18.13.632.6633,143
Roosevelt15.8037.8Unstable212,627
Sandoval25.916.135.727104,183
San Juan67.950.185.75682,484
San Miguel192.435.6526,319
Santa Fe17.310.524.125144,462
Sierra35.89.362.3719,555
Socorro13.6032.5214,675
Taos29.712.247.31136,997
Torrance28.10.655.7Unstable414,225
Union00004,422
Valencia23.811.436.31458,720
NM33.230.4365331,604,110
US25U.S. Data from 2015.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Data Source, 2006 and later: New Mexico Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NM-EDSS), Infectious Disease Epidemiology Bureau, New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.


Invasive Pneumococcal Disease - Persons Aged 65 Years and Older by Health Region, New Mexico, 2014-2016

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

New Mexico Health RegionCases per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 6
Northwest78.459.996.96987,989
Northeast17.211.123.231180,517
Metro30.42535.7125411,571
Southeast29.419.938.837125,973
Southwest26.819.534.152193,899
New Mexico31.52835315999,949

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Data Source, 2006 and later: New Mexico Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NM-EDSS), Infectious Disease Epidemiology Bureau, New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.


Invasive Pneumococcal Disease - Persons Aged 65 Years and Older by Race/Ethnicity, New Mexico, 2012-2016

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Race/EthnicityCases per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 6
American Indian/Alaska Native9069.8110.37684,402
Asian/Pacific Islander220.443.6Unstable418,185
Black/African American26.85.448.2Unstable622,383
Hispanic21.917.925.9113515,971
White21.418.524.3206963,168
New Mexico33.230.4365331,604,110

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Data Source, 2006 and later: New Mexico Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NM-EDSS), Infectious Disease Epidemiology Bureau, New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.

References and Community Resources

For more information, visit the CDC's Active Bacterial Core surveillance website: [http://www.cdc.gov/abcs/index.html]

More Resources and Links

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

Page Content Updated On 08/25/2017, Published on 08/30/2017
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Fri, 06 December 2019 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Wed, 30 Aug 2017 17:33:43 MDT