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Complete Health Indicator Report of Nutrition - Adolescent Fruit and Vegetable Consumption

Definition

Percentage of high school students who ate five or more servings of fruits or vegetables per day

Numerator

Number of high school students who ate a total of five or more servings of fruits and vegetables per day

Denominator

Number of students who responded to each of the questions about fruits or vegetables

Why Is This Important?

Fruits and vegetables contain essential vitamins, minerals, fiber, and other compounds that may help prevent many chronic diseases. Compared with people who consume a diet with only small amounts of fruits and vegetables, those who eat more generous amounts as part of a healthful diet are likely to have reduced risk of chronic diseases, including stroke and perhaps other cardiovascular diseases, and certain cancers (1). Fruits and vegetables also help people to achieve and maintain a healthy weight, because they are relatively low in energy density (2). To promote health and prevent chronic diseases, the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend 2 cups of fruit per day for a standard 2,000 calorie diet, with recommendations based on an individual's age, gender, and activity level (3).

Other Objectives

Similar to HP2020 objectives: NWS-14: Increase the contribution of fruits to the diets of the population aged 2 years and older Increase the contribution of fruits to the diets of the population aged 2 years and older and NWS-15.1: Increase the contribution of total vegetables to the diets of the population aged 2 years and older New Mexico Community Health Status Indicator (CHSI)

Evidence-based Practices

For persons to make healthy food choices, healthy food options must be available and accessible. Families living in low-income neighborhoods and rural areas of the state often have less access to healthier food and beverage choices than those in more urban, higher-income areas. Here are some things communities may do.(4) - Making healthy food choices available and affordable in public venues - Restricting availability of less healthy options in public venues - Improve Geographic Availability of Supermarkets in Underserved Areas - Provide Incentives to Food Retailers to Locate in and/or Offer Healthier Food and Beverage Choices in Underserved Areas - Improve Availability of Mechanisms for Purchasing Foods from Farms - Provide Incentives for the Production, Distribution, and Procurement of Foods from Local Farms- Institute Smaller Portion Size Options in Public Service Venues - Limit Advertisements of Less Healthy Foods and Beverages - Discourage Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages


Graphical Data Views

Percentage of Adolescents Who Ate Five or More Servings of Fruits and Vegetables Daily by Year, New Mexico and U.S., 2003-2017

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confidence limits

NM vs. U.S.YearPercentage Consuming Five a DayLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 18
New Mexico200317.4%14.7%20.5%1,6249,672
New Mexico200517.8%16.5%19.2%8464,900
New Mexico200717.9%15.4%20.8%3932,289
New Mexico200920.9%18.3%23.7%9884,506
New Mexico201123.8%22.2%25.6%1,3665,607
New Mexico201322.5%20.5%24.6%1,1865,211
New Mexico201520.9%19.3%22.5%1,6217,923
New Mexico201721.0%19.7%22.3%1,1535,479
United States199923.9%22.2%25.6%15,109
United States200121.4%20.1%22.8%12,894
United States200322.0%20.6%23.6%14,616
United States200520.1%18.6%21.6%13,166
United States200721.4%19.8%23.1%13,333
United States200922.3%21.1%23.7%16,057
United States2011**Data not available
United States2013**Data not available
United States2015**Data not available
United States2017**Data not available

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, New Mexico Department of Health and Public Education Department.
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey Data


Percentage of Adolescents Who Ate Five or More Servings of Fruits and Vegetables Daily by Sex and Year, New Mexico, 2003-2017

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confidence limits

Sex: Males vs. FemalesYearPercentage Consuming Five a DayLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 16
Male200319.1%16.8%21.6%2011 YRRS, dg8454,558
Male200518.9%16.9%21.1%2011 YRRS, dg4302,293
Male200719.5%17.1%22.1%2011 YRRS, dg2031,090
Male200925.3%22.8%28.1%2011 YRRS, dg5912,203
Male201127.5%25.5%29.6%2011 YRRS, dg7882,755
Male201325.1%22.4%27.9%2013 YRRS, dg6542,627
Male201523.9%21.8%26.0%2017 YRRS lmh8953,782
Male201724.4%22.5%26.4%2017 YRRS lmh6482,662
Female200315.5%12.3%19.4%2011 YRRS, dg7414,942
Female200516.7%14.2%19.4%2011 YRRS, dg4002,536
Female200716.2%12.8%20.2%2011 YRRS, dg1851,179
Female200916.2%13.3%19.7%2011 YRRS, dg3902,288
Female201119.9%17.9%22.0%2011 YRRS, dg5722,843
Female201319.8%17.2%22.7%2013 YRRS, dg5292,576
Female201517.8%16.1%19.7%2017 YRRS lmh7224,129
Female201717.5%16.2%18.9%2017 YRRS lmh4992,803

Data Source

New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, New Mexico Department of Health and Public Education Department.


Percentage of Adolescents Who Ate Five or More Servings of Fruits and Vegetables Daily by County, New Mexico, 2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

CountyPercentage Consuming Five a DayLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 34
Bernalillo17.8%16.4%19.2%6473,544
Catron22.2%14.6%32.2%1464
Chaves19.9%15.3%25.5%106518
Cibola23.0%19.9%26.3%186808
Colfax21.6%17.1%26.9%61270
Curry11.5%7.1%17.9%27225
De Baca**Data suppressed due to small sample size.
Dona Ana20.2%17.6%23.2%201982
Eddy15.6%11.2%21.2%39230
Grant19.0%15.7%22.8%74368
Guadalupe24.9%21.5%28.7%42181
Harding**Data suppressed due to small sample size.
Hidalgo10.3%7.0%14.8%15144
Lea13.8%11.2%16.9%114654
Lincoln21.6%18.4%25.1%126592
Los Alamos19.7%15.5%24.8%68344
Luna14.9%8.0%25.9%Unstable21124
McKinley28.3%21.2%36.7%114359
Mora23.2%16.1%32.3%1878
Otero17.1%12.1%23.5%107534
Quay11.8%8.8%15.7%30253
Rio Arriba26.6%23.5%30.0%101440
Roosevelt16.1%10.1%24.7%31176
Sandoval22.7%18.6%27.4%2961,255
San Juan24.2%21.5%27.2%2731,021
San Miguel27.4%24.5%30.5%115448
Santa Fe18.4%15.9%21.2%3801,920
Sierra25.7%20.1%32.2%35141
Socorro22.2%17.5%27.9%50222
Taos21.5%18.7%24.7%163758
Torrance16.7%13.9%20.1%67353
Union13.9%10.2%18.8%18128
Valencia23.0%18.4%28.3%96427
New Mexico19.8%18.9%20.7%3,63917,577

Data Notes

Rates for Chaves County, Harding County, and Union County were supressed because of inadequate response rates from those counties. The NM rate was calculated from the standard CDC YRRS dataset and is consistent with the rates found on the CDC Website. The county rates were calculated from a special New Mexico dataset that has a larger survey sample size.

Data Source

New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, New Mexico Department of Health and Public Education Department.


Percentage of Adolescents Who Ate Five or More Servings of Fruits and Vegetables Daily by Race/Ethnicity, New Mexico, 2017

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confidence limits

Race/EthnicityPercentage Consuming Five a DayLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 6
American Indian/Alaska Native29.2%26.7%31.9%2941,008
Asian/Pacific Islander29.8%22.4%38.4%49180
Black/African American23.1%17.8%29.4%43198
Hispanic19.4%17.7%21.2%4702,536
White18.7%16.4%21.3%2861,519
New Mexico21.0%19.7%22.3%1,1535,441

Data Source

New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, New Mexico Department of Health and Public Education Department.

References and Community Resources

Refrences: 1. World Cancer Research Fund, American Institute for Cancer Research. Food, nutrition, physical activity and the prevention of cancer: a global perspective. November 2007. [Online Access] http://www.dietandcancerreport.org 2. CDC. Can eating fruits and vegetables help people to manage their weight? (Research to Practice Series No. 1) [Online Access] http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/nutrition/pdf/rtp_practitioner_10_07.pdf 3. Report of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2005 http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/report 4. Recommended Community Strategies and Measurements to Prevent Obesity in the United States, Laura Kettel Khan, PhD. CDC, MMWR July 24, 2009 / 58(RR07);1-26. Accessed online on 12/9/2010 at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5807a1.htm?s_cid=rr5807a1_e.

More Resources and Links

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

Page Content Updated On 01/08/2019, Published on 01/08/2019
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Fri, 23 August 2019 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Tue, 8 Jan 2019 10:48:14 MST