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Complete Health Indicator Report of Obesity - Adult Prevalence

Definition

The adult obesity prevalence is reported as the percent of BRFSS respondents whose self-reported height and weight corresponds to a Body Mass Index (BMI) equal to or greater than 30.0.

Numerator

Number of obese adults from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey.

Denominator

Number of adults from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey.

Data Interpretation Issues

Data for this indicator report are from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), an ongoing survey of adults regarding their health-related behaviors, health conditions, and preventive services. Data are collected in all 50 states, D.C., and U.S. territories. Responses have been weighted to reflect the New Mexico adult population by age, sex, ethnicity, geographic region, marital status, education level, home ownership and type of phone ownership. The survey is conducted using scientific telephone survey methods for landline and cellular phones (with cellular since 2011). The landline phone portion of the survey excludes adults living in group quarters such as college dormitories, nursing homes, military barracks, and prisons. The cellular phone portion of the survey includes adult students living in college dormitories but excludes other group quarters. Beginning with 2011, the BRFSS updated its surveillance methods by adding in calls to cell phones and changing its weighting methods. These changes improve BRFSS' ability to take into account the increasing proportion of U.S. adults using only cellular telephones as well as to adjust survey data to improve the representativeness of the estimates generated from the survey. Results have been adjusted for the probability of selection of the respondent, and have been weighted to the adult population by age, gender, phone type, detailed race/ethnicity, renter/owner, education, marital status, and geographic area. Lastly and importantly, these changes mean that the data from years prior to 2011 are not directly comparable to data from 2011 and beyond. Please see the [https://ibis.health.state.nm.us/view/docs/Query/BRFSS/BRFSS_fact_sheet_Aug2012.pdf BRFSS Method Change Factsheet]. The "missing" and "don't know" responses are excluded when calculating a percentage.

Why Is This Important?

Obesity is associated with an increased risk for a number of other chronic diseases, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and a number of cancers (endometrial, colon, kidney, esophageal, post-menopausal breast, liver, pancreas, gallbladder, stomach, ovary, thyroid, meningioma, and multiple myeloma.) In both New Mexico and the United States, the percentage of adults who are obese, based on telephone survey data, has more than doubled since 1990. Excess weight also contributes to the development of arthritis, a chronic disease that is the leading cause of disability amongst adults in the nation and the state. Obesity has been identified as a population health priority for the New Mexico Department of Health along with diabetes, substance misuse, and unintended teen pregnancy.

Healthy People Objective: NWS-9, Reduce the proportion of adults who are obese

U.S. Target: 30.5 percent

Other Objectives

New Mexico Community Health Status Indicator (CHSI)

How Are We Doing?

After decades of climbing, New Mexico's overall rate of adult obesity has remained stable since 2014. However, certain groups of adults, such as American Indians, Hispanics, people who didn't graduate from high school, and people experiencing poverty, have significantly higher rates of obesity than some other groups. By age group, rates of obesity are higher for men and women in the 35 to 49 and 50 to 64 year age ranges than for those in older and younger age groups.

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

New Mexico's percent is consistently equal to or slightly below the national median percent of obese adult over the past decade.

What Is Being Done?

- The New Mexico Department of Health's (DOH) Obesity, Nutrition and Physical Activity Program (ONAPA) collaborates with state and local partners to implement sustainable policy, systems and environmental obesity prevention strategies to support healthy eating and physical activity. Healthy Kids Healthy Communities (HKHC), ONAPA's key program, builds state and local partnerships to expand opportunities for healthy eating and physical activity for children and low-income adults where they live, learn, play, work, eat, and shop. HKHC coalitions in 11 counties and 3 tribal communities collaborate with over 600 state and local partners to create sustainable community change through a collective impact framework; key elements include a common agenda, mutually reinforcing activities, continuous communication, shared measurements, and active coalitions to support increased healthy eating, increased physical activity, and healthy weights. - With the addition of federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) funding in 2015, the ONAPA Program expanded its reach to the low-income adult population, specifically those participating in food assistance programs within tribal communities and high-poverty counties. ONAPA, Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), and NM State University are coordinating efforts to provide nutrition education through the implementation of food tastings and cooking demos for WIC recipients using WIC eligible foods, primarily fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Targeting women and children captures a majority of SNAP-eligible recipients, many of whom also receive WIC benefits, and provides an opportunity to reinforce and build upon nutrition and physical activity education strategies across multiple programs.

Evidence-based Practices

To help communities in this effort, CDC initiated the Common Community Measures for Obesity Prevention Project (the Measures Project). The objective of the Measures Project was to identify and recommend a set of strategies and associated measurements that communities and local governments can use to plan and monitor environmental and policy-level changes for obesity prevention. This report describes the expert panel process that was used to identify 24 recommended strategies for obesity prevention and a suggested measurement for each strategy that communities can use to assess performance and track progress over time. The 24 strategies are divided into six categories: 1) strategies to promote the availability of affordable healthy food and beverages), 2) strategies to support healthy food and beverage choices, 3) a strategy to encourage breastfeeding, 4) strategies to encourage physical activity or limit sedentary activity among children and youth, 5) strategies to create safe communities that support physical activity, and 6) a strategy to encourage communities to organize for change. For more information, please see Kahn, et al., Recommended Community Strategies and Measurements to Prevent Obesity in the United States, [http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5807a1.htm http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5807a1.htm].

Available Services

- ONAPA (and HKHC) provides ongoing technical assistance on how to implement obesity prevention strategies that support healthy eating and physical activity in communities across New Mexico. - The Double Up Food Bucks Program allows SNAP participants to stretch their food dollars at 35 farmers' markets across the state that process SNAP transactions. This initiative improves fresh food access for nearly 400,000 SNAP participants in 18 counties and gives a boost to local economies by recirculating food dollars: [http://www.doubleupnm.org/ http://www.doubleupnm.org/].

Health Program Information

NM Department of Healthy Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Program: https://nmhealth.org/about/phd/cdb/hknm/


Related Indicators

Related Relevant Population Characteristics Indicators:


Related Health Care System Factors Indicators:


Related Risk Factors Indicators:


Related Health Status Outcomes Indicators:




Graphical Data Views

Obesity Among Adults New Mexico and U.S., 1998-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

BRFSS by weighting method by NM vs. U.S.YearPercentage Who Were ObeseLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 40
New Mexico, Old Weighting Method199815.2%13.9%16.5%
New Mexico, Old Weighting Method199917.7%16.3%19.2%
New Mexico, Old Weighting Method200019.4%17.9%20.9%
New Mexico, Old Weighting Method200119.7%18.2%21.3%
New Mexico, Old Weighting Method200219.7%18.3%21.2%
New Mexico, Old Weighting Method200320.3%19.0%21.6%
New Mexico, Old Weighting Method200421.5%20.2%22.8%1,3226,177
New Mexico, Old Weighting Method200521.7%20.3%23.2%1,2125,352
New Mexico, Old Weighting Method200622.9%21.4%24.4%1,5406,330
New Mexico, Old Weighting Method200725.1%23.6%26.7%1,6286,397
New Mexico, Old Weighting Method200825.7%24.1%27.4%1,5805,993
New Mexico, Old Weighting Method200925.6%24.2%27.0%2,2078,532
New Mexico, Old Weighting Method201025.6%24.0%27.3%1,7566,746
New Mexico, New Weighting Method201126.3%25.1%27.6%2,3108,981
New Mexico, New Weighting Method201227.1%25.9%28.3%2,2268,385
New Mexico, New Weighting Method201326.4%25.1%27.7%2,4058,910
New Mexico, New Weighting Method201428.4%27.0%30.0%2,2908,284
New Mexico, New Weighting Method201528.8%27.1%30.6%1,7326,206
New Mexico, New Weighting Method201628.3%26.6%30.1%1,5865,531
New Mexico, New Weighting Method201728.4%26.8%30.0%1,7586,046
U.S., Old Weighting Method199818.3%
U.S., Old Weighting Method199919.6%
U.S., Old Weighting Method200020.0%
U.S., Old Weighting Method200120.9%
U.S., Old Weighting Method200221.9%
U.S., Old Weighting Method200322.9%
U.S., Old Weighting Method200423.2%
U.S., Old Weighting Method200524.4%
U.S., Old Weighting Method200625.1%
U.S., Old Weighting Method200726.3%
U.S., Old Weighting Method200826.7%
U.S., Old Weighting Method200926.9%
U.S., Old Weighting Method201027.5%
U.S., New Weighting Method201127.7%
U.S., New Weighting Method201228.1%
U.S., New Weighting Method201328.9%
U.S., New Weighting Method201429.5%
U.S., New Weighting Method201529.8%
U.S., New Weighting Method201629.9%
U.S., New Weighting Method201731.6%

Data Notes

Obesity is defined as having a Body Mass Index (BMI) equal to or greater than 30.0 kg/m2. BMI is calculated as: [[weight (in pounds) / [height (in inches)]2] x 703]. BMI is a measure of a person's weight in relationship to height. Obesity refers to excessive body fat. For most adults, BMI is strongly correlated with total body fat, and serves as a good surrogate measure for obesity.   U.S. value is the median value for all states and the District of Columbia. Estimates for 2011 and forward should not be compared to earlier years (please refer to Data Interpretation Issues, below).

Data Sources

  • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, together with New Mexico Department of Health, Injury and Behavioral Epidemiology Bureau.
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), BRFSS Prevalence and Trends Data, [https://www.cdc.gov/brfss/brfssprevalence].


Obesity Among Adults by Year and Sex, New Mexico, 2011-2017

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confidence limits

Sex: Males vs. FemalesYearPercentage Who Were ObeseLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 14
Male201126.3%24.5%28.3%9503,742
Male201226.7%24.9%28.5%9053,546
Male201325.6%23.7%27.7%1,0013,886
Male201427.5%25.4%29.7%9763,586
Male201529.2%26.6%31.9%7612,713
Male201629.1%26.5%31.8%7222,485
Male201727.4%25.2%29.8%7752,768
Female201126.3%24.8%27.9%1,3605,239
Female201227.5%26.0%29.2%1,3214,839
Female201327.1%25.4%28.9%1,4045,028
Female201429.4%27.3%31.5%1,3144,698
Female201528.5%26.2%30.9%9713,493
Female201627.6%25.3%30.0%8643,046
Female201729.4%27.1%31.7%9833,275

Data Notes

Obesity is defined as having a Body Mass Index (BMI) equal to or greater than 30.0 kg/m2. BMI is calculated as: [[weight (in pounds) / [height (in inches)]2] x 703]. BMI is a measure of a person's weight in relationship to height. Obesity refers to excessive body fat. For most adults, BMI is strongly correlated with total body fat, and serves as a good surrogate measure for obesity.

Data Source

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, together with New Mexico Department of Health, Injury and Behavioral Epidemiology Bureau.


Obesity Among Adults by Age and Sex, New Mexico, 2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Sex: Males vs. FemalesAge GroupPercentage Who Were ObeseLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 8
Male18-3423.9%19.3%29.1%118474
Male35-4935.0%30.0%40.4%182496
Male50-6432.2%28.1%36.6%264793
Male65+19.3%16.4%22.7%209986
Female18-3425.5%20.7%31.0%122430
Female35-4935.0%30.2%40.2%213543
Female50-6434.5%30.4%38.9%329995
Female65+23.8%20.6%27.3%3151,286

Data Notes

Obesity is defined as having a Body Mass Index (BMI) equal to or greater than 30.0 kg/m2. BMI is calculated as: [[weight (in pounds) / [height (in inches)]2] x 703]. BMI is a measure of a person's weight in relationship to height. Obesity refers to excessive body fat. For most adults, BMI is strongly correlated with total body fat, and serves as a good surrogate measure for obesity.

Data Source

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, together with New Mexico Department of Health, Injury and Behavioral Epidemiology Bureau.


Obesity Among Adults by Race/Ethnicity, New Mexico, 2015-2017

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confidence limits

Race/EthnicityPercentage Who Were ObeseLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 7
American Indian/Alaska Native38.0%34.7%41.4%7391,761
Asian/Pacific Islander13.4%7.6%22.6%18136
Black/African American30.2%22.4%39.3%67199
Hispanic31.3%29.6%33.0%1,7895,551
White24.5%23.3%25.8%2,3599,714
New Mexico28.5%27.5%29.5%5,07617,783
United States31.3%U.S. value is for 2017

Data Notes

Obesity is defined as having a Body Mass Index (BMI) equal to or greater than 30.0 kg/m2. BMI is calculated as: [[weight (in pounds) / [height (in inches)]2] x 703]. BMI is a measure of a person's weight in relationship to height. Obesity refers to excessive body fat. For most adults, BMI is strongly correlated with total body fat, and serves as a good surrogate measure for obesity.

Data Sources

  • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, together with New Mexico Department of Health, Injury and Behavioral Epidemiology Bureau.
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), BRFSS Prevalence and Trends Data, [https://www.cdc.gov/brfss/brfssprevalence].


Obesity Among Adults by County, New Mexico, 2015-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

CountyPercentage Who Were ObeseLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 35
Bernalillo27.3%25.1%29.5%6822,649
Catron23.0%11.6%40.4%1683
Chaves37.3%32.5%42.5%210564
Cibola30.2%24.3%36.8%168587
Colfax26.2%18.4%35.8%35133
Curry34.1%28.4%40.4%122394
De Baca**Rate was suppressed due to small sample size.39
Dona Ana31.7%28.9%34.6%5141,655
Eddy36.9%32.2%42.0%216572
Grant27.2%21.4%33.8%86307
Guadalupe**Rate was suppressed due to small sample size.32
Harding**Rate was suppressed due to small sample size.14
Hidalgo**Rate was suppressed due to small sample size.37
Lea33.3%28.6%38.3%191544
Lincoln26.4%20.9%32.7%85357
Los Alamos17.2%11.6%24.7%31176
Luna32.6%24.0%42.5%62187
McKinley35.6%31.8%39.6%4151,120
Mora29.3%17.0%45.5%1462
Otero30.7%26.2%35.6%200608
Quay29.8%19.8%42.2%35119
Rio Arriba30.3%25.3%35.9%175590
Roosevelt30.6%22.8%39.7%56191
Sandoval26.1%21.7%31.1%197776
San Juan34.2%31.6%37.0%7712,513
San Miguel28.3%22.0%35.5%89299
Santa Fe18.4%15.9%21.3%2391,483
Sierra23.8%17.0%32.4%38150
Socorro30.2%21.0%41.4%45134
Taos20.5%14.4%28.4%55334
Torrance20.3%11.0%34.5%1576
Union28.8%16.6%45.2%1758
Valencia30.2%24.0%37.2%139448
New Mexico28.5%27.5%29.5%5,07617,783
U.S.31.3%U.S. value is for 2017

Data Notes

Obesity is defined as having a Body Mass Index (BMI) equal to or greater than 30.0 kg/m2. BMI is calculated as: [[weight (in pounds) / [height (in inches)]2] x 703]. BMI is a measure of a person's weight in relationship to height. Obesity refers to excessive body fat. For most adults, BMI is strongly correlated with total body fat, and serves as a good surrogate measure for obesity.   U.S. value is the median percentage across participating States and the District of Columbia (DC). **Data were not available for some counties due to insufficient numbers of survey respondents (fewer than 50) from those counties who were surveyed in the BRFSS. The county-level BRFSS data used for this indicator report were weighted to be representative of the New Mexico Health Region populations. Had the data been weighted to be representative of each county population, the results would likely have been different.

Data Sources

  • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, together with New Mexico Department of Health, Injury and Behavioral Epidemiology Bureau.
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), BRFSS Prevalence and Trends Data, [https://www.cdc.gov/brfss/brfssprevalence].


Obesity Among Adults by Household Income, New Mexico, 2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Household IncomePercentage Who Were ObeseLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 5
<$15,00035.9%31.2%40.9%298792
$15,000 to $24,99928.6%25.0%32.5%3481,132
$25,000 to $49,99927.8%24.4%31.4%3811,347
$50,000 to 74,99928.5%24.2%33.1%228776
$75,000 or more27.3%24.1%30.7%3511,300

Data Notes

Obesity is defined as having a Body Mass Index (BMI) equal to or greater than 30.0 kg/m2. BMI is calculated as: [[weight (in pounds) / [height (in inches)]2] x 703]. BMI is a measure of a person's weight in relationship to height. Obesity refers to excessive body fat. For most adults, BMI is strongly correlated with total body fat, and serves as a good surrogate measure for obesity.

Data Source

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, together with New Mexico Department of Health, Injury and Behavioral Epidemiology Bureau.


Obesity Among Adults by Education Level, New Mexico, 2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Education LevelPercentage Who Were ObeseLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 4
Less Than High School33.6%28.9%38.7%243662
H.S. Grad or G.E.D.29.1%26.2%32.2%5161,693
Some Post High School28.1%25.2%31.2%4941,644
College Graduate24.3%21.8%27.0%5032,041

Data Notes

Obesity is defined as having a Body Mass Index (BMI) equal to or greater than 30.0 kg/m2. BMI is calculated as: [[weight (in pounds) / [height (in inches)]2] x 703]. BMI is a measure of a person's weight in relationship to height. Obesity refers to excessive body fat. For most adults, BMI is strongly correlated with total body fat, and serves as a good surrogate measure for obesity.

Data Source

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, together with New Mexico Department of Health, Injury and Behavioral Epidemiology Bureau.


Obesity Among Adults by Sexual Orientation, New Mexico, 2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Sexual OrientationPercentage Who Were ObeseLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 3
Straight28.2%26.6%30.0%1,6075,558
Gay or Lesbian33.0%21.4%47.0%34104
Bisexual33.3%21.7%47.3%3392

Data Notes

Obesity is defined as having a Body Mass Index (BMI) equal to or greater than 30.0 kg/m2. BMI is calculated as: [[weight (in pounds) / [height (in inches)]2] x 703]. BMI is a measure of a person's weight in relationship to height. Obesity refers to excessive body fat. For most adults, BMI is strongly correlated with total body fat, and serves as a good surrogate measure for obesity.

Data Source

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, together with New Mexico Department of Health, Injury and Behavioral Epidemiology Bureau.


Obesity Among Adults by U.S. States, 2017

::chart - missing::

StatePercentage Who Were Obese
Record Count: 52
Alabama36.3%
Alaska34.2%
Arizona29.5%
Arkansas35.0%
California25.1%
Colorado22.6%
Connecticut26.9%
Delaware31.8%
District of Columbia22.9%
Florida28.4%
Georgia31.6%
Hawaii23.8%
Idaho29.3%
Illinois31.1%
Indiana33.6%
Iowa36.4%
Kansas32.4%
Kentucky34.3%
Louisiana36.2%
Maine29.1%
Maryland31.3%
Massachucetts25.9%
Michigan32.3%
Minnesota28.4%
Mississippi37.3%
Missouri32.5%
Montana25.3%
Nebraska32.8%
Nevada26.7%
New Hampshire28.1%
New Jersey27.3%
New Mexico28.4%
New York25.7%
North Carolina32.1%
North Dakota33.2%
Ohio33.8%
Oklahoma36.5%
Oregon29.4%
Pennsylvania31.6%
Rhode Island30.0%
South Carolina34.1%
South Dakota31.9%
Tennessee32.8%
Texas33.0%
Utah25.3%
Vermont27.6%
Virginia30.1%
Washington27.7%
West Virginia38.1%
Wisconsin32.0%
Wyoming28.8%
United States31.3%

Data Notes

Obesity is defined as having a Body Mass Index (BMI) equal to or greater than 30.0 kg/m2. BMI is calculated as: [[weight (in pounds) / [height (in inches)]2] x 703]. BMI is a measure of a person's weight in relationship to height. Obesity refers to excessive body fat. For most adults, BMI is strongly correlated with total body fat, and serves as a good surrogate measure for obesity.

Data Source

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), BRFSS Prevalence and Trends Data, [https://www.cdc.gov/brfss/brfssprevalence].

References and Community Resources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity: [http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/obesity/index.htm http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/obesity/index.htm] NM Department of Healthy Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Program: https://nmhealth.org/about/phd/cdb/hknm/ USDA Food and Nutrition Service: [http://www.fns.usda.gov/ http://www.fns.usda.gov/] Double Up Food Bucks - New Mexico: [http://www.doubleupnm.org/ http://www.doubleupnm.org/] National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Obesity Education Initiative: [http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/oei/index.htm http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/oei/index.htm] National Cancer Institute: https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/obesity/obesity-fact-sheet#q3 U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agriculture Library, Food and Nutrition Information Center: [http://fnic.nal.usda.gov/ http://fnic.nal.usda.gov/] Laura Kettel Khan, PhD. Recommended Community Strategies and Measurements to Prevent Obesity in the United States. CDC, MMWR July 24, 2009 / 58(RR07);1-26. [Online Access] http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5807a1.htm?s_cid=rr5807a1_e.

More Resources and Links

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

Page Content Updated On 12/19/2018, Published on 12/27/2018
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Fri, 15 November 2019 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Thu, 27 Dec 2018 08:57:04 MST