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Complete Health Indicator Report of Physical Activity - Adolescent Prevalence

Definition

Students who were physically active for a total of at least 60 minutes per day

Numerator

Number of students who answered, "7 days", to the question, "During the past 7 days, on how many days were you physically active for a total of at least 60 minutes per day? (Add up all the time you spent in any kind of physical activity that increased your heart rate and made you breathe hard some of the time.)"

Denominator

Number of students who answered the question, "During the past 7 days, on how many days were you physically active for a total of at least 60 minutes per day?

Why Is This Important?

Physical activity is crucial to maintaining physical health. Among adolescents, regular physical activity helps improve bone health, body weight and composition, physical fitness and mental health. In addition, active adolescents are more likely to become active adults.

Healthy People Objective: PA-3.1, Increase the proportion of adolescents who meet current Federal physical activity guidelines for aerobic physical activity and for muscle-strengthening activity: Aerobic physical activity

U.S. Target: 20.2 percent

Other Objectives

New Mexico Community Health Status Indicator (CHSI)

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

Compared to the US, a higher percentage of New Mexico high school students report meeting physical activity recommendations.

What Is Being Done?

NM Healthier Weight Council's Community and Regional Planning Advisory Group is working to increase awareness among elected officials, health professionals, community planners, and other key stakeholders on the impact of the built environment on physical activity.

Evidence-based Practices

To increase physical activity using informational approaches, the Task Force on Community Preventive Services recommends community-wide campaigns and point-of-decision prompts. To increase physical activity using behavioral or social approaches, the Task Force recommends school-based physical education, individually-adapted health behavior change programs, and social support interventions in community settings. To increase physical activity using environmental or policy approaches, the Task Force recommends creation of or enhanced access to places for physical activity combined with informational outreach activities, and point-of-decision prompts. For more information, please see the Guide to Community Preventive SErvices: Waht Works to Promote Health? Chapter 2, Physical Activity, http://www.thecommunityguide.org/library/book/index.html.

Available Services

New Mexico Safe Routes to School - http://nmshtd.state.nm.us/main.asp?secid=15411


Related Indicators

Health Status Outcomes

Regular physical activity during adolescence can be protective against numerous chronic health conditions during adolescence and into adulthood.

Related Health Status Outcomes Indicators:




Graphical Data Views

Adolescent Physical Activity by Year, New Mexico and U.S., 2013-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

NM vs. U.S.YearPercentage with Daily ActivityLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 10
New Mexico200722.1%19.9%24.6%6302,305
New Mexico200923.4%21.0%26.1%1,0794,510
New Mexico201126.3%24.8%27.9%1,6855,624
New Mexico201331.1%28.8%33.6%1,6165,236
New Mexico201530.9%29.1%32.7%2,4147,924
New Mexico201730.8%28.4%33.3%1,6815,508
United States201128.7%15,048
United States201327.1%13,310
United States201527.1%15,245
United States201726.1%14,238

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, New Mexico Department of Health and Public Education Department.
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey Data


Adolescent Physical Activity by Race/Ethnicity, New Mexico, 2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Race/EthnicityPercentage with Daily ActivityLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 7
American Indian/Alaska Native28.4%23.7%33.5%2961,018
Asian/Pacific Islander28.7%20.0%39.4%50180
Black/African American38.5%32.7%44.6%80201
Hispanic28.3%25.2%31.6%7232,545
White35.4%32.8%38.0%5211,522
New Mexico30.8%28.4%33.3%1,6815,466
United States26.1%24.1%28.3%14,238

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, New Mexico Department of Health and Public Education Department.
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey Data


Adolescent Physical Activity by County, New Mexico, 2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

CountyPercentage with Daily ActivityLower LimitUpper LimitNoteNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 35
Bernalillo27.2%25.5%29.0%9343,564
Catron46.0%27.8%65.3%3164
Chaves28.3%23.4%33.7%159520
Cibola32.2%27.1%37.8%260814
Colfax28.9%21.8%37.2%86273
Curry40.0%29.1%52.0%83226
De Baca39.9%27.7%53.5%DeBaca County data are from 2015.2770
Dona Ana26.1%22.9%29.5%251982
Eddy30.7%24.0%38.3%77229
Grant34.6%27.7%42.2%124372
Guadalupe31.1%27.2%35.2%56182
Harding**Data suppressed due to small sample size.
Hidalgo37.9%26.8%50.6%52146
Lea35.4%28.7%42.6%237662
Lincoln33.3%28.4%38.6%201599
Los Alamos22.6%17.3%29.0%79348
Luna21.8%14.3%31.9%31123
McKinley30.8%22.0%41.2%108363
Mora26.9%23.1%31.1%2278
Otero29.5%23.6%36.1%171536
Quay34.2%23.7%46.6%84254
Rio Arriba28.9%19.4%40.7%146444
Roosevelt40.3%26.1%56.3%70174
Sandoval34.2%30.1%38.6%4521,259
San Juan30.1%26.9%33.6%2901,034
San Miguel33.5%26.9%40.8%155454
Santa Fe24.1%21.7%26.5%4541,926
Sierra38.7%32.6%45.2%56143
Socorro31.8%25.2%39.2%71224
Taos26.4%22.8%30.4%199764
Torrance36.8%34.3%39.4%136358
Union48.8%41.9%55.8%63129
Valencia27.4%22.7%32.7%116430
New Mexico29.2%28.1%30.3%5,26017,690
U.S.26.1%24.1%28.3%14,238

Data Notes

Rates for Chaves County, Harding County, and Union County were supressed because of inadequate response rates from those counties. The NM rate was calculated from the standard CDC YRRS dataset and is consistent with the rates found on the CDC Website. The county rates were calculated from a special New Mexico dataset that has a larger survey sample size.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, New Mexico Department of Health and Public Education Department.
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey Data


Adolescent Physical Activity by Grade Level and Sex, New Mexico and U.S., 2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Sex: Males vs. FemalesGrade Level in SchoolPercentage with Daily ActivityLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 8
Male9th Grade41.8%39.4%44.3%1,0052,435
Male10th Grade39.6%37.2%42.1%1,6165,236
Male11th Grade37.4%35.2%39.7%2,4147,924
Male12th Grade34.6%31.6%37.7%1,6815,508
Female9th Grade28.5%26.1%31.1%7452,524
Female10th Grade22.6%20.5%24.8%1,6162,742
Female11th Grade19.8%18.2%21.6%2,4142,282
Female12th Grade20.2%17.8%22.8%1,6811,920

Data Source

New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, New Mexico Department of Health and Public Education Department.

References and Community Resources

http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/everyone/

More Resources and Links

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

Page Content Updated On 01/07/2019, Published on 01/07/2019
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Sat, 24 August 2019 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Mon, 7 Jan 2019 16:46:32 MST