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Risk Factors for Cancer Incidence - Cervical Cancer

Risk Factors

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, almost all cervical cancers are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), a common virus that can be passed from one person to another during sex. There are many types of HPV. Some HPV types can cause changes on a woman's cervix that can lead to cervical cancer over time, while other types can cause genital or skin warts. HPV is so common that most people get it at some time in their lives. HPV usually causes no symptoms so you can't tell that you have it. For most women, HPV will go away on its own; however, if it does not, there is a chance that over time it may cause cervical cancer. Other factors can also increase your risk of cervical cancer, including: smoking; having HIV (the virus that causes AIDS) or another condition that makes it hard for your body to fight off health problems; using birth control pills for a long time (five or more years); having given birth to three or more children; and having several sexual partners.

Related Risk Factors Indicators:


The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Tue, 18 June 2019 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Thu, 3 Jan 2019 11:44:19 MST