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Health Indicator Report of Alcohol - Alcohol-Related Chronic Liver Disease Deaths

Alcohol-related chronic liver disease (AR-CLD) is a progressive disease caused by alcohol abuse. It imposes a heavy burden of morbidity and mortality in New Mexico, and it is the principal driver of New Mexico's consistently high alcohol-related chronic disease death rate. Over the past 30 years, New Mexico's AR-CLD rate has trended upward, while the national rate has decreased 20%. In 1993, AR-CLD surpassed alcohol-related motor vehicle crash death as the leading cause of alcohol-related death in New Mexico. Since 1997, New Mexico's death rate from AR-CLD has consistently been substantially higher than the death rate from alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes.

Notes

Rates are age-adjusted to the US 2000 standard population.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.

Data Interpretation Issues

According to the CDC's Alcohol-Related Disease Impact (ARDI) website (http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/ardi/Homepage.aspx), there are 54 causes of death considered to be at least partially attributable to alcohol. These include 35 alcohol-related chronic diseases (e.g., liver cirrhosis, alcohol dependence); and 19 alcohol-related injuries (e.g., motor vehicle crashes, poisonings, falls, homicide, suicide). Alcohol-related deaths are estimated by multiplying the total number of deaths in a cause-of-death category by the percent of deaths in that category that are considered to be caused by alcohol. This percent, the so-called alcohol attributable fraction (AAF), can vary from 100% for causes of death that are completely related to alcohol use (e.g., alcoholic liver disease, alcohol poisoning); to less than 100% for causes that are only sometimes related to alcohol use. For example, per CDC ARDI, the AAF for portal hypertension is 40%. This means that 40% of deaths from portal hypertension are considered to be caused by alcohol use. The AAF for homicide is 47% and for suicide is 23%. The AAF for alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes is age- and gender-specific, ranging from 49% for males ages 25-34 to 8% for females ages 65 and over. For more information on the AAFs used here see the CDC ARDI Methods webpage (http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/ardi/AboutARDIMethods.htm).

Definition

Alcohol-related chronic liver disease (AR-CLD) is a progressive chronic disease caused by chronic alcohol abuse.

Numerator

Number of alcohol-related chronic liver deaths in New Mexico

Denominator

New Mexico Population

Other Objectives

Substance Abuse Epidemiology Report Indicator

Available Services

Doctors, nurses and other health professionals should screen all adult patients and counsel those who drink too much to drink less. This is called alcohol screening and brief intervention (A-SBI). A-SBI can reduce how much alcohol a person drinks on an occasion by 25%. A-SBI is recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Community Guide), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), and the World Health Organization (WHO). For more information on A-SBI, please the CDC vital signs website: www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/alcohol-screening-counseling/index.html
Page Content Updated On 09/08/2017, Published on 05/30/2018
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Mon, 12 November 2018 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Wed, 30 May 2018 17:05:38 MDT