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Substance Abuse Epidemiology Profile for Smoking-Related Deaths

Problem Statement

Smoking is the leading cause of preventable death. The five leading causes of smoking-related death in New Mexico are chronic airway obstruction, lung cancer, ischemic heart disease, other heart disease, and bronchitis/emphysema. Historically, New Mexico's rates for smoking-related causes such as lung cancer have been among the lowest in the nation. Nonetheless, a comparison of New Mexico's smoking-related death rates to its alcohol and drug-related death rates shows that the burden of death associated with smoking is still considerably greater than the burden associated with these other substances. This speaks to the public health importance of smoking prevention efforts, even in a state with low rates relative to the rest of the nation.
New Mexico's smoking-related death rate is lower than the national rate. Historically, New Mexico's rates for smoking-related causes such as lung cancer have been among the lowest in the nation. Nonetheless, a comparison of New Mexico's smoking-related death rates to its alcohol and drug-related death rates shows that the burden of death associated with smoking is still considerably greater than the burden associated with these other substances. This speaks to the public health importance of smoking prevention efforts, even in a state with low rates relative to the rest of the nation.


Chart 1. Smoking-Related Deaths by Year, New Mexico and U.S., 2008-2016

Smoking-Related Deaths by Year, New Mexico and U.S., 2008-2016

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Data Notes

All rates are deaths per 100,000 population and age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.

Table 1. Smoking-Related Deaths by Age, Sex and Race/Ethnicity, New Mexico, 2012-2016

Number of DeathsDeaths per 100,000 Population
Sex and Race/EthnicityAges 0-24Ages 25-64Ages 65+All AgesAges 0-24Ages 25-64Ages 65+All Ages
Male, American Indian0101171271045.7495.397.1
Male, Asian/Pacific Islander0181634039.7240.762.9
Male, Black05079129073.9717.9137.5
Male, Hispanic06301,4582,088052.5629.7113.8
Male, White01,1303,5414,6710102.3793.4145.6
Male, All Races01,9475,2857,232073.8723.8132.2
Female, American Indian04794141019.2187.835.1
Female, Asian/Pacific Islander0102837016.9243.743.7
Female, Black0234062047.8350.264
Female, Hispanic02808791,15902330951.1
Female, White06292,5653,194056.3496.481.2
Female, All Races09923,6134,605037413.467.6
Both Sexes, American Indian0147264412031.8313.360
Both Sexes, Asian/Pacific Islander0284472027242.651
Both Sexes, Black072119191063.1531.599.9
Both Sexes, Hispanic09102,3373,247037.6452.978.9
Both Sexes, White01,7596,1077,865079.2634110.1
Both Sexes, All Races02,9408,89811,837055.3554.796.3


Data Notes

All rates are deaths per 100,000 population and age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population.   Age-specific rates (e.g., Ages 0-24) are per 100,000; all-ages rate is per 100,000, age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.

Problem Statement (continued)

Smoking-related death rates increase sharply in the oldest age group (age 65+), consistent with the fact that smoking-related causes of death are mostly chronic conditions with a long development period. This is in contrast to alcohol- and drug-related deaths, both of which show a greater proportion of "premature" deaths (deaths before age 65+). Male rates are roughly 1.5 to 3 times female rates across all race/ethnic groups. Among males, Blacks have the highest rates followed by Whites, while among females Whites have the highest rates followed by Blacks.
The counties with the highest rates and relatively heavy burdens of smoking-related death (i.e., 20 or more deaths a year) are Sierra, Quay, Torrance, Chaves, and Lea counties. The high rates in most of these counties (and in the state overall) are driven by high rates among Whites. However, there are notably elevated rates among Hispanics in Quay and Sierra counties; and a substantial burden of smoking-related death among Hispanics in several other counties (e.g., Bernalillo, Dona Ana, Santa Fe). The high rates of smoking-related death among Blacks in Curry and Lea counties are also notable. The smoking-related death rates among the American Indian and Asian/Pacific Islander population are relatively low.

Table 2. Smoking-Related Deaths by County and Race/Ethnicity, New Mexico, 2012-2016

Number of DeathsDeaths per 100,000 Population, Age-adjusted
CountyAmerican IndianAsian PIBlackHispanicWhiteAll RacesAmerican IndianAsian PIBlackHispanicWhiteAll Races
Bernalillo5939881,0322,2493,49473.351.8105.58198.492.1
Catron1005303698.20069.988.283.8
Chaves315104400514106.951.371.387.3158.6132.1
Cibola27004176145510088.1150.695.9
Colfax10041781217000103.4108.2109.4
Curry221759237316109.3112.8163.8103.6144.4134.7
De Baca0005202500088.4168.4140.5
Dona Ana55143696081,00486.656.7101.165.9108.686.5
Eddy1258236946128.594.3111.488.8170.1142
Grant1027115923447.80171.576.4101.792.5
Guadalupe00016102600063.6173.685.4
Harding000325****092.7100.196.4
Hidalgo0009253400060.7125.395.1
Lea10187134043237.60147.179.3175.9143.1
Lincoln40019141164235.50061.699.292.8
Los Alamos01146672051.247.131.361.257.3
Luna31257195257171.548.3167.181196.5142.4
McKinley12110305520658.318.9069.497.666.2
Mora0002352800079.338.570.4
Otero1441065387480104.191.889.471.1140.1119.9
Quay1102772101204.4117.40126.4145.8138.6
Rio Arriba16011395621166.8055.483.1105.586
Roosevelt10022106129161.40099.5140.7129.6
Sandoval365911646062753.846.457.665.291.181.4
San Juan85246044059150.345.597.675.2109.989.8
San Miguel031139632060161.867.9101.6111.4104.4
Santa Fe73228541571446.724.829.181.366.370.9
Sierra20123214241132.50125.9106.3197.5179.2
Socorro500397412077.60083.5133.3108.8
Taos601867516852.7058.368.361.464.3
Torrance40134106145243.10123.8109150.4138.2
Union000112031000118.982.691.2
Valencia101816131349691.239.4165.280.4138.9111.1
NM412721913,2477,86511,837605199.978.9110.196.3


Data Notes

All rates are deaths per 100,000 population and age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population.   **Data suppressed due to small numbers

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.

Chart 2. Smoking-Related Deaths by County, New Mexico, 2012-2016



Smoking-Related Deaths by County, New Mexico, 2012-2016

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Data Notes

All rates are deaths per 100,000 population and age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.

Chart 3. Smoking-Related Deaths by County, New Mexico, 2012-2016

Smoking-Related Deaths by County, New Mexico, 2012-2016

supplemental image

Data Notes

All rates are deaths per 100,000 population and age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population

Chart 4. Smoking-Related Deaths by Small Area, New Mexico, 2005-2009



Smoking-Related Deaths by Small Area, New Mexico, 2005-2009

supplemental image



Data Notes

All rates are deaths per 100,000 population and age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population.   All rates are deaths per 100,000 population and have been age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.
Page Content Updated On 09/08/2017, Published on 05/30/2018
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Fri, 04 December 2020 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Wed, 30 May 2018 17:05:12 MDT