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Substance Abuse Epidemiology Profile for Youth Current Heroin Use

Problem Statement

Substance abuse among youth remains a major public health problem. Substance use and abuse can increase the risk for injuries, violence, HIV infection, and other diseases (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/alcoholdrug).
The rate of lifetime heroin use by youth has not significantly varied in recent years, neither in New Mexico nor the US. The NM rate for lifetime heroin use has been consistently higher than the US rate. This remained true in 2015, with a rate of 3.5% for NM and 2.1% for the US. For current heroin use, there is no apparent trend in the New Mexico rate. There is no national comparison for current heroin use.


Chart 1. Youth Current Heroin Use, Grades 9-12 by Year, New Mexico and U.S., 2003-2017

Youth Current Heroin Use, Grades 9-12 by Year, New Mexico and U.S., 2003-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Data Notes

There is no national comparison for current heroin use.

Data Source

New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, New Mexico Department of Health and Public Education Department.

Table 1. Youth Current Heroin Use, Grades 9-12 by Grade, Sex, and Race/Ethnicity, New Mexico, 2017

Percentage that Used Heroin
Sex and Race/Ethnicity9th10th11th12thAll Grades
Male, American Indian1.72.902.81.9
Male, Asian/Pacific Islander********7.3
Male, Black********9.2
Male, Hispanic3.95.12.25.14.2
Male, White1.72.82.23.32.5
Male, All Races3.54.12.64.33.6
Female, American Indian5.54.90.32.53.5
Female, Asian/Pacific Islander********5.2
Female, Black********0.4
Female, Hispanic0.91.90.52.71.9
Female, White1.101.81.21
Female, All Races1.61.612.11.9
Both Sexes, American Indian43.80.12.62.9
Both Sexes, Asian/Pacific Islander**6.49.3**6.4
Both Sexes, Black7.82.2****6
Both Sexes, Hispanic2.63.41.33.83.1
Both Sexes, White1.41.422.31.8
Both Sexes, All Races2.72.91.83.22.8


Data Notes

**Data have been suppressed due to small numbers

Data Source

New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, New Mexico Department of Health and Public Education Department.

Problem Statement

Asian or Pacific Islander (9.3%) and Black (8.9%) students were more likely to be current heroin users than Hispanic (3.0%), American Indian (2.1%), or White (1.5%) students. The prevalence of current heroin use was not associated with grade level. Males were more likely to report current heroin use (4.3%) than females (1.2%), this difference was statistically significant.
In 2015, the highest rates for lifetime heroin use were in Mora (9.3%), Roosevelt (6.8%), Luna (6.1%), and Hidalgo (5.7%) counties, and the lowest in Union (0.7%), Eddy (0.9%), and Los Alamos (0.9%) counties.

Table 2. Youth Current Heroin Use, Grades 9-12 by County, New Mexico, 2017

Percentage that Used Heroin
County
Bernalillo2.6
Catron0
Chaves3.2
Cibola3.2
Colfax2.2
Curry0
De Baca**
Dona Ana4.5
Eddy1
Grant5.1
Guadalupe2.9
Harding**
Hidalgo0.7
Lea3.1
Lincoln2.3
Los Alamos1.3
Luna1.7
McKinley0.6
Mora3
Otero2.5
Quay0.6
Rio Arriba5.4
Roosevelt0.9
Sandoval1.9
San Juan2
San Miguel2.8
Santa Fe3.3
Sierra6
Socorro3.6
Taos2.5
Torrance2.5
Union0
Valencia5.5
New Mexico2.8
U.S.**


Data Notes

**Data suppressed due to small numbers

Data Source

New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, New Mexico Department of Health and Public Education Department.

Chart 2. Youth Current Heroin Use, Grades 9-12 by County, New Mexico, 2017



Youth Current Heroin Use, Grades 9-12 by County, New Mexico, 2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Data Notes

**Data suppressed due to small numbers

Data Source

New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, New Mexico Department of Health and Public Education Department.

Chart 3. Youth Current Heroin Use, Grades 9-12 by County, New Mexico, 2015

Youth Current Heroin Use, Grades 9-12 by County, New Mexico, 2015

supplemental image

Page Content Updated On 11/30/2018, Published on 12/19/2018
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Wed, 03 June 2020 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Wed, 19 Dec 2018 08:42:08 MST