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Substance Abuse Epidemiology Profile for Tobacco Use - Youth Smoking Prevalence

Problem Statement

Nicotine exposure in any form among youth and young adults can disrupt growth of brain circuits that control attention, learning, and susceptibility to addiction to other drugs (e.g., cocaine and methamphetamine.) Effects of nicotine exposure on youth brain development can be long-lasting, and can include lower impulse control and mood disorders. Young people who smoke are also in danger of nicotine addiction, reduced lung growth and function, and early cardiovascular disease. Shortness of breath and lower stamina due to smoking can affect athletic performance in youth and teens. Smoking is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States. Smoking is initiated and established primarily during adolescence, with more than 80% of adult smokers first smoking before age 18. One in six adults and one in nine youth smoke in New Mexico. About half of all lifetime smokers will die early because of their tobacco use. In New Mexico, about 2,800 people die from tobacco use annually and another 84,000 are living with tobacco-related diseases. Annual smoking-related medical costs in New Mexico total $844 million.
The prevalence of current cigarette smoking among New Mexico and U.S. high school youth has decreased dramatically in the past decade, New Mexico's youth cigarette smoking rate in 2017 (10.6%) is at an all-time low, and it is statistically similar to that in the U.S. (8.8%). Both the New Mexico and U.S. youth cigarette smoking prevalence have met and surpassed the Healthy People 2020 goal of 16.0%.


Chart 1. Youth Cigarette Smoking Prevalence, Grades 9-12 New Mexico and U.S., 2007-2017

Youth Cigarette Smoking Prevalence, Grades 9-12 New Mexico and U.S., 2007-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Data Notes

US data source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2007-2017 Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Available at: www.cdc.gov/yrbs.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, New Mexico Department of Health and Public Education Department.
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey Data

Table 1. Youth Cigarette Smoking Prevalence, Grades 9-12 by Grade, Sex, and Race/Ethnicity, New Mexico, 2013

Percentage Current Smokers
Sex and Race/Ethnicity9th10th11th12thAll Grades
Male, American Indian13.121.719.319.618
Male, Asian/Pacific Islander********11.2
Male, Black********20.4
Male, Hispanic12.618.616.827.518.4
Male, White8.412.410.121.412.7
Male, All Races11.516.914.924.116.4
Female, American Indian11.112.816.7**13.2
Female, Asian/Pacific Islander********7.5
Female, Black**********
Female, Hispanic11.49.715.114.612.4
Female, White6.59.816.916.411.8
Female, All Races9.910.415.514.512.3
Both Sexes, American Indian12.117.917.916.715.7
Both Sexes, Asian/Pacific Islander********11.3
Both Sexes, Black********14.7
Both Sexes, Hispanic1213.915.920.515.3
Both Sexes, White7.511.213.21912.3
Both Sexes, All Races10.713.615.219.214.4


Data Notes

Age-specific rates (e.g., Ages 0-24) are per 100,000; all-ages rate is per 100,000, age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population.

Data Source

New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, New Mexico Department of Health and Public Education Department.

Problem Statement

The prevalence of smoking increases with grade, being higher among 12 graders. For 9 graders, Blacks and AI/AN present the highest rates. AI/AN of both sexes present then highest rates in grades 10 and 11, whereas male AI/AN and male Hispanics present the highest rates among the 12 graders.
In 2017, the counties with the highest prevalence of current smoking were Rio Arriba (17.8%) and Otero (17.6%). The counties with the lowest prevalence of current smoking were Curry (4.2%) and Catron (5.4%).

Table 2. Youth Cigarette Smoking Prevalence, Grades 9-12 by County, New Mexico, 2017

Percentage Current Smokers
County
Bernalillo9.1
Catron5.4
Chaves11.7
Cibola16.8
Colfax12.1
Curry4.2
De Baca**
Dona Ana11.5
Eddy9.3
Grant12
Guadalupe10.5
Harding**
Hidalgo7.6
Lea12.5
Lincoln13.7
Los Alamos10.2
Luna15.5
McKinley14.2
Mora12.3
Otero17.6
Quay8.4
Rio Arriba17.8
Roosevelt10.7
Sandoval11.4
San Juan10.3
San Miguel14.7
Santa Fe11.6
Sierra7.4
Socorro16.7
Taos14.8
Torrance16.6
Union13.7
Valencia14.6
New Mexico10.6
U.S.8.8


Data Notes

**Data are not available for some counties (DeBaca and Harding) due to lack of participation in the YRRS by one or more school districts or insufficient sample size. County-level YRRS estimates come from the larger NM sample dataset, while state-level YRRS estimates come from the smaller CDC sample.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, New Mexico Department of Health and Public Education Department.
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey Data

Chart 2. Youth Cigarette Smoking Prevalence, Grades 9-12 by County, New Mexico, 2017



Youth Cigarette Smoking Prevalence, Grades 9-12 by County, New Mexico, 2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Data Notes

**Data are not available for some counties (DeBaca and Harding) due to lack of participation in the YRRS by one or more school districts or insufficient sample size. County-level YRRS estimates come from the larger NM sample dataset, while state-level YRRS estimates come from the smaller CDC sample.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, New Mexico Department of Health and Public Education Department.
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey Data

Chart 3. Youth Cigarette Smoking Prevalence, Grades 9-12 by County, New Mexico, 2015

Youth Cigarette Smoking Prevalence, Grades 9-12 by County, New Mexico, 2015

supplemental image

Page Content Updated On 10/23/2018, Published on 10/23/2018
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Wed, 03 June 2020 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Tue, 23 Oct 2018 16:09:45 MDT