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Health Indicator Report of Alcohol - Alcohol-related Chronic Disease Deaths

Chronic heavy drinking (defined as drinking, on average, more than two drinks per day for men, and more than one drink per day for women) often is associated with alcoholism or alcohol dependence, and can cause or contribute to a number of diseases, including alcoholic liver cirrhosis. For the past 15 years, New Mexico's death rate from alcohol-related chronic disease has consistently been first or second in the nation, and 1.5 to two times the national rate. The national death rate from alcohol-related chronic disease in 2015 (13.9) was the same as that in 1990. In contrast, New Mexico's rate increased 52 percent from 1990 to 2015.

Notes

Rates are age-adjusted to the US 2000 standard population. Alcohol-related deaths for 1990-1998 were defined by underlying cause of death based on International Classification of Disease version 9 (ICD-9) codes; and alcohol-related deaths for 1999 and later were defined by underlying cause of death based on International Classification of Disease version 10 (ICD-10) codes.

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Death Data: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics (BVRHS), New Mexico Department of Health.
  • Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • U.S. Data Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, ]http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/]

Data Interpretation Issues

According to the CDC's Alcohol-Related Disease Impact (ARDI) website (http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/ardi/Homepage.aspx), there are 54 causes of death considered to be at least partially attributable to alcohol. These include 35 alcohol-related chronic diseases (e.g., liver cirrhosis, alcohol dependence); and 19 alcohol-related injuries (e.g., motor vehicle crashes, poisonings, falls, homicide, suicide). Alcohol-related deaths are estimated by multiplying the total number of deaths in a cause-of-death category by the percent of deaths in that category that are considered to be caused by alcohol. This percent, the so-called alcohol attributable fraction (AAF), can vary from 100% for causes of death that are completely related to alcohol use (e.g., alcoholic liver disease, alcohol poisoning); to less than 100% for causes that are only sometimes related to alcohol use. For example, per CDC ARDI, the AAF for portal hypertension is 40%. This means that 40% of deaths from portal hypertension are considered to be caused by alcohol use. The AAF for homicide is 47% and for suicide is 23%. The AAF for alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes is age- and gender-specific, ranging from 49% for males ages 25-34 to 8% for females ages 65 and over. For more information on the AAFs used here see the CDC ARDI Methods webpage (http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/ardi/AboutARDIMethods.htm).

Definition

Alcohol-related chronic disease death is defined as the number of chronic disease deaths attributed to alcohol per 100,000 population. The alcohol-related chronic disease death rates reported here are based on definitions and alcohol-attributable fractions from the CDC's Alcohol-Related Disease Impact (ARDI) website (http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/ardi/Homepage.aspx).

Numerator

Number of alcohol-related chronic disease deaths in New Mexico

Denominator

New Mexico population
Page Content Updated On 11/30/2017, Published on 01/18/2019
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Thu, 14 November 2019 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Fri, 18 Jan 2019 17:32:09 MST