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Health Indicator Report of Nutrition - Adolescent Fruit and Vegetable Consumption

Fruits and vegetables contain essential vitamins, minerals, fiber, and other compounds that may help prevent many chronic diseases. Compared with people who consume a diet with only small amounts of fruits and vegetables, those who eat more generous amounts as part of a healthful diet are likely to have reduced risk of chronic diseases, including stroke and perhaps other cardiovascular diseases, and certain cancers (1). Fruits and vegetables also help people to achieve and maintain a healthy weight, because they are relatively low in energy density (2). To promote health and prevent chronic diseases, the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend 2 cups of fruit per day for a standard 2,000 calorie diet, with recommendations based on an individual's age, gender, and activity level (3).

Data Sources

  • New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, New Mexico Department of Health and Public Education Department.
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey Data

Definition

Percentage of high school students who ate five or more servings of fruits or vegetables per day

Numerator

Number of high school students who ate a total of five or more servings of fruits and vegetables per day

Denominator

Number of students who responded to each of the questions about fruits or vegetables
Page Content Updated On 01/08/2019, Published on 01/08/2019
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Thu, 05 August 2021 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Tue, 8 Jan 2019 10:48:14 MST