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Health Indicator Report of Syphilis Rates

Syphilis was on the verge of elimination in 2000. Since 2011, the number of cases of primary and secondary syphilis, which is the most infectious, in New Mexico has steadily increased (following national trends), especially in the MSM (males who have sex with males) population (male to female ratio of syphilis infection is 85%:15%). Syphilis can be treated with antibiotics; however, if left untreated for more than a year, it can eventually lead to paralysis, numbness, dementia, and death. Syphilis can also be transmitted from mother to infant.

Notes

Primary and Secondary syphilis cases only are counted for graph by year comparing US and New Mexico case rates. The same is true for any narrative comparisons of New Mexico to U.S. cases, since that is the CDC case rate selection criteria. All other graphs include Primary, Secondary, and Early Latent cases.

Data Sources

  • Patient Reporting Investigating Surveillance Manager, Infectious Disease Bureau, New Mexico Department of Health
  • New Mexico Population Estimates: University of New Mexico, Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) Program, http://gps.unm.edu/.
  • U.S. Data Source: Division of STD Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Definition

Syphilis cases reported in the state of New Mexico per 100,000 population.

Numerator

Number of cases of chlamydia reported to the state of New Mexico (and Centers for Disease Control) in New Mexico residents from all health care providers.

Denominator

Total Population
Page Content Updated On 01/02/2019, Published on 10/07/2019
The information provided above is from the New Mexico Department of Health's NM-IBIS web site (http://ibis.health.state.nm.us). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Thu, 05 August 2021 from New Mexico Department of Health, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.health.state.nm.us".

Content updated: Wed, 2 Oct 2019 16:37:48 MDT